Current Arsenic News and Events

Current Arsenic News and Events, Arsenic News Articles.
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Some food contamination starts in the soil
Rice husk residue can prevent uptake of harmful elements in rice. (2021-02-03)

Exposure to metals can impact pregnancy
Exposure to metals such as nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead may disrupt a woman's hormones during pregnancy, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-12-21)

Do the benefits of Christmas outweigh its harms?
The Christmas season is associated with preventable harms from cards, tree decorations, and presents, as well as overeating and overdrinking, so do the benefits of Christmas outweigh the harms? In the Christmas issue of The BMJ, Robin Ferner and Jeffrey Aronson dig out some cautionary tales from the archives. (2020-12-16)

Several U.S. populations and regions exposed to high arsenic concentrations in drinking water
A national study of public water systems found that arsenic levels were not uniform across the U.S., even after implementation of the latest national regulatory standard. In the first study of differences in public drinking water arsenic exposures by geographic subgroups, researchers confirmed that community water systems reliant on groundwater, serving smaller populations located in the Southwest, and Hispanic communities were more likely to continue exceeding the national maximum containment level, raising environmental justice concerns. (2020-12-09)

SMART researchers develop plant nanobionic sensor to monitor arsenic levels in soil
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) have developed -- for the first time -- a novel type of plant nanobionic optical sensor that can, in real-time, detect and monitor arsenic levels in the belowground environment, with significant advantages over conventional methods used to measure arsenic in the environment. The new sensor will improve arsenic detection and will help safeguard food safety, and will be useful for agricultural research and environmental monitoring. (2020-12-02)

Dartmouth study examines well water testing promotion in pediatric primary care
Findings from a new study conducted by a team of researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published in the journal Preventive Medicine Reports, show that involving pediatric practices in the promotion of private well water testing can influence parental compliance. (2020-10-26)

UC studies tobacco use, cancer connection
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have identified new clues into ways tobacco use impacts patients with kidney cancer. (2020-10-20)

RUDN University soil scientists: Green suburbs can be more harmful than city centers
A team of soil scientists from RUDN University confirmed that traditional approaches to urban soil pollution monitoring ignore actual risks for urban residents because they don't take into consideration the barrier function of the soil. The team used Moscow as an example to show that not only polluted downtown districts but also recreational parks and forest zones can pose a threat to people. (2020-10-07)

Living in an anoxic world: Microbes using arsenic are a link to early life
Much of life on planet Earth today relies on oxygen to exist, but before oxygen was present on our blue planet, lifeforms likely used arsenic instead. These findings are detailed in research published today in Communications Earth and Environment. (2020-09-22)

Toxic metals can affect student health performance, say scientists from RUDN university
A group of medical and environmental researchers from RUDN University evaluated the level of heavy metals in the organism of first-year university students from different countries of the world. The results of the screening helped the scientists to reveal a relationship between a region of residence and the level of toxic metal in organism. According to their opinion, increased heavy metal levels in the organism of students from Africa and Latin America can have a negative impact on their health and performance. (2020-09-14)

Heavy metals make soil enzymes 3 times weaker, says a soil scientist from RUDN University
Heavy metals suppress enzyme activity in the soil by 3-3.5 times and have especially prominent effect on the enzymes that support carbon and sulfur circulation. This was discovered by a soil scientist from RUDN University together with his colleagues from Chile, Germany, the UK and Venezuela. The data obtained by the team can lead to more efficient use and fertilization of agricultural lands. (2020-08-26)

Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It's also caused by pollution. (2020-08-13)

Study finds high levels of toxic pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales
Researchers examined toxins in tissue concentrations and pathology data from 83 stranded dolphins and whales from 2012 to 2018. They looked at 11 different animal species to test for 17 different substances. The study is the first to report on concentrations in blubber tissues of stranded cetaceans of atrazine, DEP, NPE and triclosan. It also is the first to report concentrations of toxicants in a white-beaked dolphin and in Gervais' beaked whales. (2020-08-06)

Tracking humanity's latest toxins in stranded whales and dolphins
As humanity develops new types of plastics and chemicals, researchers are constantly trying to keep up with understanding how these contaminants affect the environment and wildlife. A new study gives a first look at the presence and potential effects of these pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales along the coast of the southeastern United States. (2020-08-05)

Finding toxic carcinogenic metals faster in foods and water
Finding out if the food and water we consume are safe from toxic and carcinogenic metals can now be much faster and simpler. Researchers at the University Johannesburg developed an efficient and more sensitive method to test for dangerous levels of heavy metals, like arsenic, cadmium and chromium in vegetables and water. The method can be used to test other foods also. A clay-based adsorbent makes testing for several metals at the same time possible. (2020-08-04)

Increased global mortality linked to arsenic exposure in rice-based diets
Rice is the most widely consumed staple food source for a large part of the world's population. It has now been confirmed that rice can contribute to prolonged low-level arsenic exposure leading to thousands of avoidable premature deaths per year. (2020-08-04)

Leukemia drug shows the potential to treat aggressive pediatric brain câncer
When tested in vitro, arsenic trioxide killed tumor cells and prevented the formation of new colonies. This leukemia drug also boosted the effect of radiation therapy on medulloblastoma, a type of central nervous system tumor most common in children. (2020-07-21)

Hammer-on technique for atomic vibrations in a crystal
Vibrations of atoms in a crystal of the semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) are impulsively shifted to a higher frequency by an optically excited electric current. The related change in the spatial distribution of charge between gallium and arsenic atoms acts back on their motions via electric interactions. (2020-07-14)

Invisible defence against adenoviruses
An adenovirus infection can be potentially life-threatening, especially for children after a stem cell transplant. Virologists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Research Center for Environmental Health Helmholtz Zentrum München have successfully shown that a previously approved medication used in cancer treatment could help inhibit this virus infection. Due to the special mechanism of action, the virus cannot develop defence strategies. (2020-07-13)

Southwestern correctional facilities' drinking water puts inmate health at risk
The first nationwide analysis of drinking water quality in United States correctional facilities found average arsenic concentrations in drinking water in Southwestern United States correctional facilities were twice as high as average arsenic concentrations in other Southwest community drinking water systems. More than a quarter of correctional facilities in the Southwest reported average arsenic levels exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 10 μg/L maximum contaminant level. (2020-06-22)

Tiger snakes tell more about local wetlands' pollution levels
Tiger snakes living in Perth's urban wetlands are accumulating toxic heavy metals in their livers, suggesting that their habitats -- critical, local ecosystems -- are contaminated and the species may be suffering as a result. (2020-06-02)

Contamined soils determined root characteristics
University of Cordoba Professor Rafael Villar participated in a study on the variation of root traits among Mediterranean trees planted in metal-contaminated soil (2020-05-29)

'Black nitrogen'
In the periodic table of elements there is one golden rule for carbon, oxygen, and other light elements. Under high pressures they have similar structures to heavier elements in the same group of elements. Only nitrogen always seemed unwilling to toe the line. However, high-pressure researchers of the University of Bayreuth have actually disproved this special status. (2020-05-29)

New map reveals global scope of groundwater arsenic risk
Up to 220 million people worldwide, with approximately 94% of them in Asia, could be at risk of drinking well water containing harmful levels of arsenic, a tasteless, odorless and naturally occurring poison. (2020-05-21)

Clay layers and distant pumping trigger arsenic contamination in Bangladesh groundwater
To avoid arsenic contamination, many Bangladeshi households access water via private wells drilled to 300 feet or less, beneath impermeable clay layers. Such clay layers have been thought to protect groundwater in the underlying aquifers from the downward flow of contaminants. However, a study published in Nature Communications this week suggests that such clay layers do not always protect against arsenic, and could even be a source of contamination in some wells. (2020-05-07)

Half of UK rice breaches limits on arsenic for children, warn scientists
Scientists have called for labelling to warn the public about levels of arsenic in rice, after their research found half of rice varieties studied exceeded maximum limits on the deadly toxin. (2020-05-01)

Graphene heterostructures with black phosphorus, arsenic enable new infrared detectors
MIPT scientists and their colleagues from Japan and the U.S. have calculated the parameters of photodetectors comprised by layers of graphene and a combination of black phosphorus and black arsenic. These sensors are able to detect radiation with energy less than the band gap of the constituent layers without graphene. (2020-04-13)

River-groundwater hot spot for arsenic
Naturally occurring groundwater arsenic contamination is a problem of global significance, particularly in South and Southeast Asian aquifers. To address this problem, an Australian team of scientists with colleagues at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag), have used computer modelling to integrate computer simulations that mimic the complex interactions between groundwater flow, solute transport and geochemical reaction mechanisms to predict the behaviour of arsenic within aquifers -- and where and when pollution may occur in future. (2020-04-07)

Co-occurring contaminants may increase NC groundwater risks
Eighty-four percent of the wells sampled in the Kings Mountain Belt and the Charlotte and Milton Belts of the Piedmont region of North Carolina contained concentrations of vanadium and hexavalent chromium that exceeded health recommendations from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. (2020-03-24)

Natural organic matter influences arsenic release into groundwater
Millions of people worldwide consume water contaminated with levels of arsenic that exceed those recommended by the World Health Organization. This could cause health problems, such as arsenic poisoning, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Microbes in groundwater release arsenic from sediments, and organic matter helps fuel this reaction. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have discovered that the type of natural organic matter (NOM) influences the rate and level of arsenic release. (2020-03-11)

New study finds inaccuracies in arsenic test kits in Bangladesh
Researchers at the University of Michigan have raised serious concerns with the performance of some arsenic test kits commonly used in Bangladesh to monitor water contamination. (2020-03-04)

Bayreuth researchers discover new arsenic compounds in rice fields
University of Bayreuth researchers, together with scientists from Italy and China, have for the first time sys-tematically investigated under which conditions, and to what extent, sulphur-containing arsenic com-pounds are formed in rice-growing soils. In the journal ''Nature Geoscience'' the scientists present their re-sults and identify the urgent need for research with a view to protecting consumers from health risks. (2020-02-11)

Kids rice snacks in Australia contain arsenic above EU guidelines: Study
Three out of four rice-based products tested have concentrations of arsenic that exceed the EU guideline for safe rice consumption for babies and toddlers. The research used European guidelines because Australia does not have safety standards specifically for children. (2020-01-21)

Advanced polymers help streamline water purification, environmental remediation
It takes a lot of energy to collect, clean and dispose of contaminated water. Some contaminants, like arsenic, occur in low concentrations, calling for even more energy-intensive selective removal processes. (2020-01-21)

Isotopically enriched cubic boron nitride reveals high thermal conductivity
An international team of physicists, materials scientists, and mechanical engineers has confirmed the high thermal conductivity predicted in isotopically enriched cubic boron nitride, the researchers report in the electronic edition of the journal Science. c-BN is particularly challenging to make and it's difficult to measure its thermal conductivity accurately when the value is high. The team overcame these challenges, and measured thermal conductivity values for the c-BN samples that were close to their predictive calculations. (2020-01-13)

Trace Metals in Leatherback Turtle Eggs May Harm Consumers
Leatherback turtle eggs in the Panamanian Caribbean may be harmful to the health of consumers, due to the concentrations of trace metals found in them. Increasing awareness among local doctors, health workers and the public about these risks may be beneficial for the conservation of this endangered species. (2020-01-10)

Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have solved a mystery: how did arsenic show up in aquifer water that had been triple purified? Dissolved organic compounds. (2020-01-09)

It's a small (coal-polluted) world, after all
A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry underscores that the release of pollutants in one region can have implications beyond its borders; emphasizing the dire need for global collaboration on environmental issues. (2019-12-20)

Warmer temperatures will increase arsenic levels in rice, study shows
UW researchers have found that warmer temperatures, at levels expected under most climate change projections, can lead to higher concentrations of arsenic in rice grains. (2019-12-04)

Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios
Research combining future climate conditions and arsenic-induced soil stresses predicts rice yields could decline about 40 percent by 2100, a loss that would impact about 2 billion people dependent on the global crop. (2019-11-01)

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