Current Art News and Events

Current Art News and Events, Art News Articles.
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New dating techniques reveal Australia's oldest known rock painting, and it's a kangaroo
Researchers successfully date Australia's oldest intact rock painting, using pioneering radiocarbon technique. (2021-02-22)

New study gives hope of eliminating mother-to-baby transmission of HIV
Anti-retroviral drugs are a vital tool in the prevention and treatment of HIV. A new study of pregnant women in Tanzania shows that life-long antiviral treatment also seems to prevent viral transmission from mother to baby. The results of the study, which was conducted in part by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and published in Lancet HIV, make a promising contribution to the WHO's work with HIV prevention in low and middle-income countries. (2021-02-11)

Deepfake detectors can be defeated, computer scientists show for the first time
Systems designed to detect deepfakes --videos that manipulate real-life footage via artificial intelligence--can be deceived, computer scientists showed for the first time at the WACV 2021 conference which took place online Jan. 5 to 9, 2021. Researchers showed detectors can be defeated by inserting inputs called adversarial examples into every video frame. The adversarial examples are slightly manipulated inputs which cause artificial intelligence systems such as machine learning models to make a mistake. (2021-02-08)

First direct band gap measurements of wide-gap hydrogen using inelastic X-ray scattering
Utilizing a newly developed state-of-the-art synchrotron technique, a group of scientists led by Dr. Ho-kwang Mao, Director of HPSTAR, conducted the first-ever high-pressure study of the electronic band and gap information of solid hydrogen up to 90 GPa. (2021-01-26)

Why independent cultures think alike when it comes to categories: It's not in the brain
A study from the Network Dynamics Group (NDG) at Penn's Annenberg School for Communication conducted an experiment in which people were asked to categorize unfamiliar shapes. Individuals and small groups created many different unique categorization systems while large groups created systems nearly identical to one another. (2021-01-12)

Formula predicts ideal dose of stem cells to cure HIV
Scientists have determined the optimal conditions following a stem cell transplant that could control HIV without the need of an everyday pill, according to a study published today in eLife. (2021-01-12)

Archaeologists from Kuzbass created a 3D model of a part of the Tepsei archaeological site
The scientists worked in cooperation with specialists from the RSSDA laboratory (Moscow). Together, they completed a 3D virtual model of one of the clusters. (2020-12-24)

CU Anschutz researcher offers new theory on `Venus' figurines
One of world's earliest examples of art, the enigmatic `Venus' figurines carved some 30,000 years ago, have intrigued and puzzled scientists for nearly two centuries. Now a researcher from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus believes he's gathered enough evidence to solve the mystery behind these curious totems. (2020-12-01)

Children more willing to punish if the wrongdoer is 'taught a lesson'
Many children are willing to make personal sacrifices to punish wrongdoers -- and even more so if they believe punishment will teach the transgressor a lesson, a new Yale study published Nov. 23, 2020 in the journal Nature Human Behaviour shows. (2020-11-23)

The microbiome of Da Vinci's drawings
The microbiome study of seven drawings from Leonardo Da Vinci reveals that conservation work, geographical location, and past contaminations leave invisible traces on drawings despite their optimal storage conditions: a novel aspect of art objects that could be monitored to establish a bioarchive of our artistic heritage. (2020-11-20)

Drawing the line to answer art's big questions
Algorithms have shown that the compositional structure of Western landscape paintings changed 'suspiciously' smoothly between 1500 and 2000 AD, potentially indicating a selection bias by art curators or in art historical literature, physicists from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and colleagues report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2020-11-13)

Tiny device enables new record in super-fast quantum light detection
Researchers from the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs (QET Labs) and Université Côte d'Azur have made a new miniaturized light detector to measure quantum features of light in more detail than ever before. The device, made from two silicon chips working together, was used to measure the unique properties of ''squeezed'' quantum light at record high speeds. (2020-11-09)

Teens who participate in extracurriculars, get less screen time, have better mental health
A new study from UBC researchers finds that teens, especially girls, have better mental health when they spend more time taking part in extracurricular activities, like sports and art, and less time in front of screens. (2020-11-02)

New research comparing HIV medications set to change international recommendations
A new study by UBC researchers is set to change international treatment recommendations for people who are newly diagnosed with HIV--an update that could affect nearly two million people per year worldwide. (2020-10-16)

Robot swarms follow instructions to create art
Controlling a swarm of robots to paint a picture sounds like a difficult task. However, a new technique allows an artist to do just that, without worrying about providing instructions for each robot. Using this method, the artist can assign different colors to specific areas of a canvas, and the robots will work together to paint the canvas. The technique could open up new possibilities in art and other fields. (2020-10-14)

UMaine researcher: How leaves reflect light reveals evolutionary history of seed plants
The way leaves reflect light, known as plant reflectance spectra, can illuminate the evolutionary history of seed plants, according to Dudu Meireles. The University of Maine researcher and colleagues worldwide found that by measuring the light spectrum reflected by leaves, they can identify the plant and its chemistry, evolution and place in the tree of life. (2020-10-14)

How immune cells can recognise - and control - HIV when therapy is interrupted
Immune cells that can recognise residual HIV-infected cells in people living with HIV (PLWH) who take antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain active for years, says a new study published today in eLife. (2020-10-06)

Artificial intelligence in art: a simple tool or creative genius?
Intelligent algorithms are used to create paintings, write poems, and compose music. According to a study by an international team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the Center of Humans and Machines at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, whether people perceive artificial intelligence (AI) as the ingenious creator of art or simply another tool used by artists depends on how information about AI art is presented. The results were published in the journal iScience. (2020-09-30)

Study looks at encoding the odor of cigarette smoke
A recent publication in the Journal of Neuroscience by a group of researchers at the University of Kentucky looks at Encoding the Odor of Cigarette Smoke. Tim McClintock, a physiology professor at UK, says their work lays a foundation for two things. (2020-09-30)

Arnhem Land Maliwawa rock art opens window to past
Stunning Arnhem Land rock art images including three rare depictions of bilbies and a dugong have been described by researchers in a new paper in Australian Archaeology today (Oct 1). (2020-09-30)

Novel dual CAR T cell immunotherapy holds promise for targeting the HIV reservoir
A recent study published in the journal Nature Medicine, led by researchers James Riley, PhD, a professor of Microbiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Todd Allen, PhD, a professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Group Leader at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, describes a new Dual CAR T cell immunotherapy that can help fight HIV infection. (2020-09-23)

Does the Mediterranean diet protect against rheumatoid arthritis?
Previous research has demonstrated a variety of health benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet, which is rich in olive oil, cereals, fruit and vegetables, fish, and a moderate amount of dairy, meat, and wine. Now results from an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggest that the diet may also help prevent rheumatoid arthritis in individuals who smoke or used to smoke. (2020-09-10)

Images of captive torment in art
Between the arrival of pearl divers and war brides - long after Japanese performers toured Australia 150 years ago - an untold chapter of World War Two history has emerged in a new study of wartime art made by almost 5000 prisoners of war in Australia and New Zealand. Focusing on internment camps set up across Australia and NZ, Canterbury University and Flinders University art historians Richard Bullen and Tets Kimura examine some exquisite Japanese artworks produced during the extended period of war incarceration. (2020-09-04)

Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure and drug resistance are extremely common in patients living with HIV who are admitted to hospital in Malawi, according to new research published in Lancet HIV. (2020-09-02)

Unique HIV reservoirs in elite controllers
Unlike ART-treated individuals, elite controllers' viral reservoirs appear to be incapable of being reactivated. This likely helps the elite controllers maintain spontaneous, drug-free control of HIV. (2020-08-26)

Glass blowing inspires new class of quantum sensors
A glass artist's work with diamonds has opened the door to a new class of quantum sensors able to monitor changes in magnetic fields, with implications for mining and underwater monitoring. (2020-08-12)

Research suggests greater access to specific HIV and tuberculosis medications is needed
A specific combination of HIV and TB treatments, difficult to obtain in certain parts of the world, decreased mortality risk for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB. (2020-08-07)

Eyckian Lamb of God reveals her secrets
Two non-invasive chemical imaging modalities were employed to help understand the changes made over time to the Lamb of God, the focal point of the Ghent Altarpiece (1432) by Hubert and Jan Van Eyck. Two major results were obtained: a prediction of the facial features of the Lamb of God that had been hidden beneath non-original overpaint dating from the 16th century (and later), and evidence for a smaller earlier version of the Lamb's body with a more naturalistic build. (2020-07-29)

Composing creativity: Children benefit from new painting materials
New research out of the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) utilizes digital image analysis technology to shed light on some of the challenges children face when representing their imaginations through the medium of paint. The research also offers concrete insight into the development of children's psyches, and importantly, offers suggestions for educators to improve children's cognitive, spatial, and artistic abilities. (2020-07-16)

A biologist and a historian are looking for art to trace fruit and vegetable evolution
Plant geneticists seeking to understand the history of plant-based foods can decode the genomes of ancient crops from well-preserved samples. However, this approach leaves significant gaps in the evolutionary timelines of many fruits, vegetables, and cereal crops. A Science & Society article publishing July 14th in the journal Trends in Plant Science details a unique approach to filling these gaps using art--and calls on museum goers to find paintings that could have useful depictions. (2020-07-14)

Quantifying creativity to expand it? Better art begins with better understanding
Do different painting materials affect the creation of children's paintings? How might we increase children's focus and motivation to learn, while also improving their creativity? Researchers focusing on these very questions at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) have recently published the results of a wide-spanning study involving more than 650 children, revealing insight into improving fine art education for children. (2020-06-22)

Pregnancy complications in assisted reproduction linked to a specific process
An experimental study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania links a specific procedure -- embryo culture -- that is part of the assisted reproduction process (ART) to placental abnormalities, risk for preeclampsia, and abnormal fetal growth. The team, led by Marisa Bartolemei, PhD, a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, published their findings today in Development. (2020-06-08)

Doubts about the Nerja cave art having been done by neanderthals
Prehistory research staff at the University of Cordoba is investigating the reliability of Uranium-thorium dating for a chronological study of Paleolithic art and is contesting that Neanderthals made the Paeolithic art in Spanish caves. (2020-06-02)

Miniature rock art expands horizons
Australian archaeologists have discovered some of the most detailed examples of rare, small-scale rock art in the form of miniature stencils in a rockshelter traditionally owned by the Marra people. The research, published in the journal Antiquity, examined the unusual art found in the Yilbilinji rockshelter at Limmen National Park in the southwest Gulf of Carpentaria region of northern Australia. (2020-05-26)

Laser-based technique captures 3D images of impressionist-style brushstrokes
Researchers have developed a new strategy that uses optical coherence tomography (OCT) to acquire both the surface and underlying details of impressionist style oil paintings. This information can be used to create detailed 3D reconstructions to enhance the viewing experience and offer a way for the visually impaired to experience paintings. (2020-05-20)

What are your chances of having a second IVF baby after fertility treatment for the first?
As the restrictions on fertility clinics start to be lifted and IVF treatment resumes, research published in Human Reproduction journal offers reassuring news to women who have had to delay their treatment for a second IVF baby because of the coronavirus. The study analysed data from women in Australia and New Zealand to assess, for the first time, their chances of having a second child with the help of fertility treatment. (2020-05-07)

Evaluating embryo quality with ultrasensitive protein detection
Infertility is estimated to affect 9% of reproductive-aged couples globally, and many couples turn to assisted reproductive technology. Selecting embryos with maximum development potential plays a pivotal role in obtaining the highest rate of success. Researchers can evaluate the quality of an embryo by detecting the content of proteins secreted. In Biomicrofluidics, a method to detect trace proteins secreted by embryos using microfluidic droplets and multicolor fluorescence holds promise to select embryos for ART. (2020-04-07)

Study reveals secret of 18th-century portrait
Russian researchers and Russia's famed Tretyakov Gallery have conducted a comprehensive preconservation study of 'The Portrait of F.P. Makerovsky in a Masquerade Costume' (1789) by the Russian painter Dmitry Levitsky. (2020-03-19)

Dinosaur stomping ground in Scotland reveals thriving middle Jurassic ecosystem
During the Middle Jurassic Period, the Isle of Skye in Scotland was home to a thriving community of dinosaurs that stomped across the ancient coastline, according to a study published March 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paige dePolo and Stephen Brusatte of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and colleagues. (2020-03-11)

Simple method to prevent HIV in South Africa and Uganda works
A large research study in South Africa and Uganda using mobile vans to dispense antiretroviral treatment was very effective. The results were presented March 9, 2020 at the virtual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI). (2020-03-09)

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