Current Artificial Light News and Events | Page 25

Current Artificial Light News and Events, Artificial Light News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
Defending against cyberattacks by giving attackers 'false hope'
'The quarantine is a decoy that behaves very similar to the real compromised target to keep the attacker assuming that the attack is still succeeding. In a typical cyberattack the more deeply attackers go in the system, the more they have the ability to go many directions. It becomes like a Whack-A-Mole game for those defending the system. Our strategy simply changes the game, but makes the attackers think they are being successful.' (2019-01-28)

Scientists successfully obtain synthetic growth factor compatible to the native protein
In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at Kanazawa University show that an artificially synthesized molecule can exhibit compatible activities to natural molecules in its biological effectiveness. (2019-01-25)

Harvard researchers report positive trial results with artificial pancreas smartphone app
The results of a new clinical trial have shown the safety and efficacy of the interoperable Artificial Pancreas System smartphone app (iAPS), which can interface wirelessly with leading continuous glucose monitors (CGM), insulin pump devices, and decision-making algorithms. (2019-01-25)

It's a bird-eat-bird world
Baby birds and eggs are on the menu for at least 94 species of animals in Australia's forests and woodlands, according to new research from the University of Queensland. PhD candidate Graham Fulton reviewed 177 existing bird studies across the country, identifying Australia's most prolific nest predators and the factors affecting nest attacks. (2019-01-24)

UBC researchers develop high-level gas detection system
A new gas detector, developed by researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus, enables highly accurate odour analysis for so many different applications it has been nicknamed the 'artificial nose.' Researchers in the School of Engineering have developed a state-of-the-art microfluidic gas detector that can detect small traces of gases quickly and efficiently. It has a number of potential uses including environmental monitoring, food and beverage quality assessments, and biological and chemical analytical systems. (2019-01-23)

Artificial intelligence can dramatically cut time needed to process abnormal chest X-rays
New research has found that a novel Artificial Intelligence (AI) system can dramatically reduce the time needed to ensure that abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings will receive an expert radiologist opinion sooner, cutting the average delay from 11 days to less than three days. Chest X-rays are routinely performed to diagnose and monitor a wide range of conditions affecting the lungs, heart, bones, and soft tissues. (2019-01-22)

Plants blink: Proceeding with caution in sunlight
Plants have control mechanisms that resemble those in human senses. According to a new Weizmann Institute of Science study, plants adjust photosynthesis to rapid light changes using a sophisticated sensing system, much in the way that the human eye responds to variations in light intensity. This sensory-like regulation operates at low light intensities, when the photosynthesis machinery is most efficient but also most vulnerable to sudden light increases. (2019-01-22)

Broadband achromatic metalens focuses light regardless of polarization
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a polarization-insensitive metalens that can achromatically focus light across the visible spectrum without aberrations. This flat lens could be used for everything from virtual or augmented reality headsets to microscopy, lithography, sensors, and displays. (2019-01-21)

Ecological benefits of part-night lighting revealed
Study shows there is no difference in pollination success between part-night lighting and full darkness, highlighting the ecological benefit of switching off our street lights even for short periods in the night. (2019-01-20)

Understanding insulators with conducting edges
Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications. However, until now their characteristics have not been fully understood. Physicists at Goethe University have now modelled what are known as topological insulators with the help of ultracold quantum gases. In the current issue of Physical Review Letters, they demonstrate how the edge states could be experimentally detected. (2019-01-17)

Models of life
Friedrich Simmel und Aurore Dupin, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other. The cells, separated by fatty membranes, exchange small chemical signaling molecules to trigger more complex reactions, such as the production of RNA and other proteins. (2019-01-17)

UCLA scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting T cells
A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells -- which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab -- into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells. (2019-01-17)

Climate change: How could artificial photosynthesis contribute to limiting global warming?
If CO2 emissions do not fall fast enough, then CO2 will have to be removed from the atmosphere to limit global warming. Not only could planting new forests and biomass contribute to this, but new technologies for artificial photosynthesis as well. Physicists have estimated how much surface area such solutions would require. Although artificial photosynthesis could bind CO2 more efficiently than the natural model, huge investments into research are needed to upscale the technology. (2019-01-16)

Engineered light to improve health, food, suggests Sandia researcher in Nature
intentionally controlled light can help regulate human health and productivity by eliciting various hormonal responses. Tailored LED wavelengths and intensities also can efficiently stimulate plant growth, alter their shapes and increase their nutritional value, opening a new world of scientific and technological possibilities for indoor farming. (2019-01-16)

Scientists discover novel process to convert visible light into infrared light
Columbia and Harvard scientists have developed a novel chemical process to convert infrared energy into visible light, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure. The discovery could advance numerous fields, including clinical applications for photodynamic therapy and drug development. (2019-01-16)

New study shows smoking accelerates aging
Smoking has long been proven to negatively affect people's overall health in multiple ways. The study shows that the smokers demonstrated a higher aging ratio, and both male and female smokers were predicted to be twice as old as their chronological age as compared to nonsmokers. (2019-01-16)

Researchers create 'shortcut' to terpene biosynthesis in E. coli
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids, or terpenes, in E.coli. This shorter, more efficient, cost-effective and customizable pathway transforms E. coli into a factory that can produce terpenes for use in everything from cancer drugs to biofuels. (2019-01-16)

Velcro for human cells
Freiburg researchers engineer cellular adhesion receptors that can be controlled with light. (2019-01-15)

The algae's third eye
Scientists at the Universities of W├╝rzburg and Bielefeld in Germany have discovered an unusual new light sensor in green algae. The sensor triggers a reaction that is similar to one in the human eye. (2019-01-11)

Artificial bug eyes
Single lens eyes, like those in humans and many other animals, can create sharp images, but the compound eyes of insects and crustaceans have an edge when it comes to peripheral vision, light sensitivity and motion detection. That's why scientists are developing artificial compound eyes to give sight to autonomous vehicles and robots, among other applications. Now, a report in ACS Nano describes the preparation of bioinspired artificial compound eyes using a simple low-cost approach. (2019-01-09)

Lithium-matrix anode protected by a solid electrolyte layer for stable lithium metal batteries
A house-like Li anode was designed. The house matrix was composed of carbon fiber and affords a stable structure to relieve the volume change. The housed Li|LiFePO4 batteries exhibited over 95 percent capacity retention after 500 cycles in coin cell and 85 percent capacity retention after 80 cycles in pouch cell. The rationally combination of solid electrolyte layer and housed framework in Li metal anode sheds insights on the design of a safe long-lifespan Li metal anode. (2019-01-09)

Machine learning and quantum mechanics team up to understand water at the atomic level
Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius? Why does ice float? Why heavy water has a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study, led by researchers in EPFL and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides physical insights into these questions by marrying data-driven machine learning techniques and quantum mechanics. (2019-01-07)

Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?
How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, a team of UCLA cognitive psychologists reports in the journal PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-01-07)

Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics
After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, EPFL scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices. (2019-01-04)

Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data
Advances in artificial intelligence, including activity trackers, smartphones and smartwatches, threaten the privacy of people's health data, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-01-03)

Controlling neurons with light -- but without wires or batteries
In optogenetics, scientists use light to turn groups of neurons in the brain on or off. New research published in Nature Electronics demonstrates a new optogenetics method that eliminates the need for bulky optical fibers, gives researchers more precise control of the light's intensity, and allows for stimulating multiple areas of the brain simultaneously. (2019-01-02)

Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound
Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step. (2018-12-21)

What do we see in a mirror?
Researchers at Aalto University developed metasurfaces with extreme angle-asymmetric response. The new device can be a good or bad reflector depending on the angle the light hits it. (2018-12-21)

Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials
'Topological materials' produce electron states that can be very interesting for technical applications, but it is extremely difficult to identify these materials and their associated electronic states. A 'crystal' made of light waves can now be used to deliberately drive the system out of equilibrium. By switching between simple and complicated states, the system reveals whether or not it has topologically interesting states. (2018-12-21)

Nightlights for stream dwellers? No, thanks
When the critters that live in and around streams and wetlands are settling into their nighttime routines, streetlights and other sources of illumination filter down through the trees and into their habitat, monkeying with the normal state of affairs, according to new research from The Ohio State University. (2018-12-19)

Loss of intertidal ecosystem exposes coastal communities
Artificial intelligence and extensive satellite imagery have allowed researchers to map the world's intertidal zones for the first time, revealing a significant loss of the crucial ecosystem. The University of Queensland and University of New South Wales study has shown that global foreshore environments declined by up to 16 percent between 1984 and 2016. (2018-12-19)

Using light to stop itch
Itch is easily one of the most annoying sensations. For chronic skin diseases like eczema, it's a major symptom. Although it gives temporary relief, scratching only makes things worse because it can cause skin damage, additional inflammation and even more itch. EMBL researchers have now found a way to stop itch with light in mice. Nature Biomedical Engineering publishes their results on Dec. 17, 2018. (2018-12-17)

UK general practitioners skeptical that artificial intelligence could replace them
In a UK-wide survey published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and colleagues investigated primary care physicians' views on AI's looming impact on health professions. (2018-12-14)

Ionosphere plasma experiments reviewed in a new Kazan University publication
There are only a few so-called 'heaters' in the world -- special facilities which create artificial plasma processes in the upper atmosphere by heating them. (2018-12-13)

NYU researchers pioneer machine learning to speed chemical discoveries, reduce waste
Researchers have combined artificial neural networks with infrared thermal imaging to control and interpret chemical reactions with new precision and speed. Novel microreactors allow chemical discoveries to take place quickly and with far less environmental waste than standard large-scale reactions. The system can reduce the decision-making process about certain chemical manufacturing processes from one year to a matter of weeks, saving tons of chemical waste and energy in the process. (2018-12-13)

IIT researchers show how plants can generate electricity to power LED light bulbs
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Pontedera (Pisa, Italy), discovered that living plants are literally 'green' power source: they can generate, by a single leaf, more than 150 Volts, enough to simultaneously power 100 LED light bulbs. Researchers also showed that an 'hybrid tree' made of natural and artificial leaves can act as an innovative 'green' electrical generator converting wind into electricity. (2018-12-12)

Custom-made artificial mother-of-pearl
ETH researchers developed an imitation comparable to mother-of-pearl, the physical properties of which can be specifically adjusted. (2018-12-11)

Cancer cells distinguished by artificial intelligence-based system
A research team at Osaka University created a system that uses a convolutional neural network to learn the features distinguishing different cancer cells, based on images from a phase-contrast microscope. This system accurately differentiated human and mouse cancer cells, as well as their radioresistant clones. This novel approach can improve the speed and accuracy of cancer diagnosis by avoiding the laboriousness and potential errors associated with equivalent analyses by humans. (2018-12-10)

Smelling the forest not the trees: Why animals are better at sniffing complex smells
Animals are much better at smelling a complex 'soup' of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient, a new study by the University of Sussex has revealed. (2018-12-10)

Seeing the light: Researchers offer solution for efficiency problem of artificial photosynthesis
Hydrogen-powered electronics, travel, and more may be a step closer thanks to the work of a collaborative team of scientists in Japan. The researchers have developed a new method to more efficiently produce a key component needed to convert solar energy and water into hydrogen fuel, a process called photoelectrochemical water splitting. (2018-12-05)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.