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Current Artificial Skin News and Events, Artificial Skin News Articles.
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Fatal chirps: Nocturnal flight calls increase building collisions among migrating birds
Birds that produce faint chirps called flight calls during nighttime migration collide with illuminated buildings much more often than closely related species that don't produce such calls, according to a new analysis of a 40-year record of thousands of building collisions in the Midwest. (2019-04-02)

Natural gene therapy for intractable skin disease discovered
Pathogenic gene mutations causing a type of intractable skin disease can be eliminated from some parts of patients' skin as they age, according to Hokkaido University researchers and their collaborators in Japan. This represents a form of natural gene therapy. (2019-04-01)

Fluorescence discovered in tiny Brazilian frogs
An international team of researchers led by NYU Abu Dhabi Postdoctoral Associate Sandra Goutte was studying the acoustic communications of these miniature frogs. When they discovered that Brachycephalus ephippium could not hear its own mating calls, they searched for alternative visual signals the frogs could use to communicate instead. Unexpectedly, when they shone an ultra-violet (UV) lamp on the frogs, their backs and heads glowed intensely. (2019-03-29)

The mystery of touch and how we feel about it
The mechanism of tactile sensation has not yet been solved though it is the basic sense of humans. NITech scientists investigated its mechanism and found the important cues in touch could be different for each person. When humans evaluate the roughness, different individuals weigh skin vibration information, spatial information, and other mechanical properties differently. The goal is to establish an estimation model of perceptual roughness ratings involving individual differences in the cognitive weights. (2019-03-29)

How light from street lamps and trees influence the activity of urban bats
A study conducted by a team led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) sheds new light on how exactly ultraviolet (UV) emitting and non-UV emitting street lamps influence the activity of bats in the Berlin metropolitan area and whether tree cover might mitigate any effect of light pollution. The study is published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. (2019-03-27)

Artificial womb technology breaks its 4 minute mile
A major advancement in pioneering technology based around the use of an artificial womb to save extremely premature babies is being hailed as a medical and biotechnological breakthrough. (2019-03-26)

ELSI scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells
Scientists build artificial cells as models of primitive cells. Research team have constructed artificial cells using minimal components that are able to supply energy to drive gene expression inside a microcompartment, thus these artificial cells can produce energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. This work marks an important milestone in constructing artificial autotrophic cells, and may shed light on how primordial cells used sunlight as an energy source early in life's history. (2019-03-25)

Contraceptive jewelry could offer a new family planning approach
Family planning for women might one day be as simple as putting on an earring. (2019-03-25)

Researchers get humans to think like computers
Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school buses. People aren't supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, Johns Hopkins University researchers show most people actually can. (2019-03-22)

Topical immunotherapy keeps skin cancer risk at bay
A combination of two topical creams already shown to clear precancerous skin lesions from sun-damaged skin also lowers the risk that patients will later develop squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. The study, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, appears March 21 in JCI Insight. (2019-03-21)

Artificial chemical DNA switch helps understand epigenetic mechanisms
Researchers from the Czech Academy of Sciences and Charles University constructed an artificial chemical DNA switch and made the first step towards artificial epigenetics -- targeted switching on and off of genes. Their paper was recently published in the journal Chemical Science. (2019-03-21)

Organic semiconductors: One transistor for all purposes
In mobiles, fridges, planes - transistors are everywhere. But they often operate only within a restricted current range. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have now developed an organic transistor that functions perfectly under both low and high currents. (2019-03-21)

Skin diseases are more common than we think
Skin diseases are ranked as the fourth most common cause of human illness, but many affected people do not consult a physician. A new Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology study estimates the prevalence of skin diseases outside the typical medical setting. (2019-03-20)

Brain-inspired AI inspires insights about the brain (and vice versa)
In a paper presented at the 2018 Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS), researchers from The University of Texas at Austin described the results of experiments that used artificial neural networks to predict with greater accuracy than ever before how different areas in the brain respond to specific words. The work employed a type of recurrent neural network called long short-term memory (LSTM) that includes in its calculations the relationships of each word to what came before to better preserve context. (2019-03-20)

NUS researchers create water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities
Inspired by jellyfish, NUS researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to soft robots aimed at mimicking biological tissues. (2019-03-18)

New potential approach to treat atopic dermatitis
How does the immune system respond to fungi on our skin? Researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated that the same immune cells that protect us against skin fungi also encourage the inflammatory symptoms of atopic dermatitis. An antibody therapy could alleviate this chronic inflammatory skin disease. (2019-03-18)

Machine learning scientists to collaborate on AI-powered drug discovery
The laboratories of Jianfeng Pei at Peking University and Alex Zhavoronkov at Insilico Medicine partner with Frontiers in Pharmacology, a leading open science platform on the research topic ''AI for drug discovery and development'' (2019-03-18)

Neural networks predict planet mass
To find out how planets form astrophysicists run complicated and time consuming computer calculations. Members of the NCCR PlanetS at the University of Bern have now developed a totally novel approach to speed up this process dramatically. They use deep learning based on artificial neural networks, a method that is well known in image recognition. (2019-03-13)

Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics?
A new study published in Physical Review Letters by Prof. Shashua's computer science doctoral students at Hebrew University has demonstrated mathematically that algorithms based on deep neural networks can be applied to better understand the world of quantum physics, as well. (2019-03-12)

New device could help minimize scarring in cosmetic surgery
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new device that could help minimize scarring during surgery. The device can ascertain the orientation of skin tension lines, which is important for wound-healing post-surgery. (2019-03-11)

Of mice, men and... computers: Common foundations of biological and artificial vision
The new study provides new insights on the mechanisms used by neurons in rat visual cortex to encode the shape of visual objects confirming the importance that rodents can have in the study of vision. The results suggest that the brain of these animals, in addition to that of the most evolved species, can inspire improvements to the so-called Artificial Deep Neural Networks, possibly helping them to 'see' in a way that is increasingly more similar to their biological counterparts. (2019-03-11)

Proof of pimple: Mouse model validates how 'good' and 'bad' bacteria affect acne
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine generated a new mouse model that mimics human acne for the first time, and used it to validate the concept of 'good' and 'bad' acne bacteria and introduce new possibilities for targeted treatments and vaccines. (2019-03-07)

How antifreeze proteins make ice crystals grow
Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold. The proteins block the growth of ice crystals. In a new study, a German-Israeli research team has confirmed that these proteins also possess an unusual second property: at low temperatures, they can promote rather than inhibit the growth of ice crystals. (2019-03-07)

Low-cost 'cancer probe' could spot deadly melanoma early
Work is being done at UBC on a tool to help in the early detection of melanoma: a simple, compact laser probe that can distinguish between harmless moles and cancerous ones -- in a matter of seconds. (2019-03-06)

Preliminary estimation of undesired substances in diapers
The French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES) has published a comprehensive report on hazardous substances in disposable panty diapers on January, 23, 2019 entitled ''Sécurité des couches pour bébé''. Here, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) evaluated the results of this report. However, a complete and conclusive assessment is currently impossible, as important detailed information of technical nature is not available to the BfR. (2019-03-06)

Elegant interplay of coloration strategies is discovered in squid's smart skin
In the blink of an eye, the squid's skin changes color and pattern for the purpose of camouflage or sexual signaling, a virtuosic display that has long fascinated scientists. Now, collaborators from Northeastern University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, report a paradigm-shifting discovery in how specialized organs in squid skin, called chromatophores, contribute to the feat via an elegant interplay of pigmentary action and structural coloration. Their study brings bio-inspired engineers ever closer to building smart skin. (2019-03-06)

Study finds robots can detect breast cancer as well as radiologists
A new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that artificial intelligence systems may be able to perform as accurately as radiologists in the evaluation of digital mammography in breast cancer screening. (2019-03-05)

Protocells use DNA logic to communicate and compute
Researchers at the University of Bristol, Eindhoven University of Technology and Microsoft Research have successfully assembled communities of artificial cells that can chemically communicate and perform molecular computations using entrapped DNA logic gates. (2019-03-04)

A common genetic signature has been discovered among three cancer prone rare skin diseases
A group of researchers lead by a lecturer from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), Marcela del Río, from the CIEMAT, the Rare Diseases Networking Biomedical Research Centre (Initials in Spanish: CIBERER-- ISCIII) and Fundación Jiménez Díaz has identified a common genetic signature among three rare skin diseases or genodermatoses: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Kindler syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. In the near future, these findings will allow efficient and safe evidence-based therapeutic approaches. (2019-03-04)

Ducks offer researchers a unique opportunity to study human touch
If it walks like a duck (or a goose or a swan), it can find food in mud without seeing or smelling it. These waterfowl bills are covered in skin that's a lot like the sensitive skin on the palms of our hands, and it can feel food in mud and murky water. Slav Bagriantsev, Eve Schneider, and Evan Anderson at Yale University are researching duck skin to learn more about how our sense of touch works. (2019-03-01)

Bacteria in frog skin may help fight fungal infections in humans
Scientists at the Smithsonian and INDICASAT in Panama explored the compounds produced by frog skin bacteria as potential novel antifungal sources for the benefit of humans and amphibians. (2019-03-01)

Scientists at FAU are researching a new method for developing artificial ovaries
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg led by Professor Aldo R. Boccaccini from the Chair of Materials Science (biomaterials) and Professor Dr. Ralf Dittrich from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen have taken an important step towards developing artificial ovaries for patients suffering from cancer. (2019-02-28)

Mobile bedside bioprinter can heal wounds
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have created such a mobile skin bioprinting system -- the first of its kind -- that allows bi-layered skin to be printed directly into a wound. (2019-02-28)

New wireless system 'cuts the cord' from newborn patient monitoring approaches
A new, less invasive system for monitoring the vital signs of some of the world's most fragile patients -- infants born pre-term or with debilitating disease -- would allow parents skin-to-skin contact with these children when they otherwise couldn't have it. (2019-02-28)

Research suggests that medications for kidney transplants increase risk of skin cancer
A study led by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) has analysed the pattern of skin cancer rates in kidney transplant patients, which suggests the increased risk is related to the anti-rejection medications. (2019-02-27)

Sandia spiking tool improves artificially intelligent devices
The aptly named software package Whetstone enables neural computer networks to process information up to 100 times more efficiently than current standards, making possible an increased use of artificial intelligence in mobile phones, self-driving cars, and image interpretation. (2019-02-27)

Fungus from the intestinal mucosa can affect lung health
Writing in the journal Cell, a research team from Cologne and Kiel describes the mechanism of 'immune cross-reactivity'. The immune system's reaction to Candida albicans in the intestine seems to amplify pathogenic immune processes in the lungs. In consequence, immune-compromised individuals may be at higher risk of health deterioration. (2019-02-22)

Researchers engineer a tougher fiber
Researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles. (2019-02-22)

Mayo Clinic researchers review modern cases of leprosy
Leprosy has a history that has spanned centuries and societies across the globe. Yet, it continues to be a problem -- even in the modern era. Sufferers from the chronic and infectious skin disease still face the social stigma and lack of medical care that people have endured since the origins of the disease itself. Although leprosy can be treated, the World Health Organization reported 216,108 cases in 2016, with some of these patients seeking treatment at Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus. (2019-02-21)

Study examines individuals' willingness to use artificial intelligence in career choices
Artificial intelligence is revolutionizing the way we do business, and it can potentially allow firms to improve their decision making, given that individuals are willing to adopt algorithms in decision-making contexts. A new Managerial and Decision Economics study indicates that cognitive perceptions play an important role on such willingness. (2019-02-21)

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