Current Arts News and Events

Current Arts News and Events, Arts News Articles.
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Mailing it in: Getting the word out on getting the ballots in
As the pandemic forced states across the nation to transform the way their residents voted in 2020, a new study by Daniel Hopkins and Marc Meredith of the University of Pennsylvania showed that an inexpensive postcard campaign conducted during Philadelphia's primary was able to boost mail-in voting. (2021-02-02)

Orange is the new 'block'
New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the core structure of the light-harvesting antenna of cyanobacteria or blue-green algae -- including key features that both collect energy and block excess light absorption. Scientists built a model of the large protein complex called phycobilisome that collects and transmits light energy. Phycobilisomes allow cyanobacteria to take advantage of different wavelengths of light than other photosynthetic organisms. The study, published Jan. 6, 2020 in Science Advances, yields insights relevant to future energy applications. (2021-01-06)

Not just lizards - alligators can regrow their tails too
A team of researchers from Arizona State University and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries have uncovered that young alligators have the ability to regrow their tails up to three-quarters of a foot, or 18% of their total body length. (2020-11-23)

OHIO professor publishes first article that looks at concussion risk in stunt performers
Dr. Jeff Russell, associate professor of athletic training within the College of Health Sciences and Professions at Ohio University, is shining a light on a segment of concussion patients who often go unnoticed in comparison to athletes: performing artists. (2020-11-23)

Archaeologists reveal human resilience in the face of climate change in ancient Turkey
An examination of two documented periods of climate change in the greater Middle East, between approximately 4,500 and 3,000 years ago, reveals local evidence of resilience and even of a flourishing ancient society despite the changes in climate seen in the larger region. The study demonstrates that human responses to climate change vary at the local level, and highlights how challenge and collapse in some areas were matched by resilience and opportunities elsewhere. (2020-10-29)

Which is more creative, the arts or the sciences?
International expert in creativity and innovation, UniSA's Professor David Cropley, is calling for Australian schools and universities to increase their emphasis on teaching creativity, as new research shows it is a core competency across all disciplines and critical for ensuring future job success. (2020-10-12)

UIC study examines high schoolers' accuracy in classification of their peers
A study led by UIC's Rachel Gordon examines the accuracy of adolescent peer group classifications based on similar values, behaviors, and interests. (2020-08-17)

Strenuous daily exercise may shorten, not prolong, longevity
By analyzing longevity data for professional Japanese traditional artists, researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have found that Kabuki actors, known for their vigorous movements, surprisingly had shorter lifespans compared with other traditional arts performers who lead mostly sedentary lifestyles. The findings suggest that job-related strenuous exercise throughout life may not necessarily extend longevity. (2020-06-18)

Music and filmmaking can transform undergraduate student perceptions of dementia
Undergraduate arts and music departments may represent untapped resources for building up the workforce needed to care for older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2020-05-06)

Aphantasia clears the way for a scientific career path
People with low or no visual imagery are more likely to work in scientific and mathematical industries than creative sectors, according to new research. (2020-05-03)

New feathered dinosaur was one of the last surviving raptors
Dineobellator notohesperus lived 67 million years ago. Steven Jasinski, who recently earned his doctorate from the School of Arts and Sciences working with Peter Dodson, also of the School of Veterinary Medicine, described the find. (2020-03-26)

Validation may be best way to support stressed out friends and family
In uncertain times, supporting your friends and family can help them make it through. But your comforting words can have different effects based on how you phrase them, according to new Penn State research. (2020-03-26)

Illuminating interactions between decision-making and the environment
Employing a game theory model, University of Pennsylvania researchers demonstrate how strategic decisions influence the environment in which those decisions are made, alterations which in turn influence strategy. Their analysis, which identifies how incentives can tip a strategy from one extreme to another, applies to fields as diverse as fisheries dynamics to climate change policy. (2020-02-19)

Plotting air raids on Britain: Map shows devastating impact of WWII Luftwaffe strikes
The interactive map uses wartime data from The National Archives to pinpoint more than 30,000 locations that were struck in the UK over the course of the war -- including the first ever attack on British shores on October 16, 1939. (2019-10-15)

Researchers suggest cultural outreach prevents social exclusion
There lies untapped potential in arts education among children and teenagers who are in danger of being marginalised later in life, according to a new policy brief released by researchers of the ArtsEqual initiative. (2019-09-18)

Plagiarism and inclusivity shown in new study into the arts, humanities and social sciences
A new study looking at the issues arising in publication ethics that journal editors face within the arts, humanities and social sciences has highlighted that detecting plagiarism in papers submitted to a journal is the most serious issue they tackle, something which over half of editors reported encountering. (2019-09-02)

Positive effect of music and dance on dementia proven by New Zealand study
Stereotypically viewed as passive and immobile, a University of Otago, New Zealand, pilot study has shown the powerful influence music and dance can have on older adults with dementia. (2019-08-07)

Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM
A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend. (2019-07-24)

Arts education can provide creative counter narratives against hate speech
Hate, as an emotion, is not an efficient response to ideological hate speech. Instead, using tools that hate speakers cannot use may undermine hate speakers' credibility. The arts have the potential to provide a more positive means of communication. (2019-05-14)

VR can improve quality of life for people with dementia
Virtual reality (VR) technology could vastly improve the quality of life for people with dementia by helping to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, new research by the University of Kent has discovered. (2019-05-09)

'Featherweight oxygen' discovery opens window on nuclear symmetry
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered and characterized a new form of oxygen dubbed 'featherweight oxygen' -- the lightest-ever version of the familiar chemical element oxygen, with only three neutrons to its eight protons. (2019-04-01)

Just add heat to open this tiny box
Researchers have designed two types of nano-sized building blocks that can automatically connect into cubes and scramble back into individual components based on the temperature of their environment. This accomplishment is another step towards chemical systems that more realistically mimic life. 'Imagine mixing two liquids together, like ink and water. They will automatically do the simple chemical process of dispersing until they are perfectly mixed,' said Professor Shuichi Hiraoka of the University of Tokyo. (2019-03-29)

Does 'pay-to-play' put sports, extracurricular activities out of reach for some students?
Students from lower income households experience twice the rate of non-participation in sports and extracurricular activities than peers. (2019-03-18)

Taking arts classes leads to better academic performance, Mason research shows
A new study from the George Mason University Arts Research Center and published in the journal Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts found a link between arts elective courses in music, dance, visual art and drama, and better grades in middle school. The study, led by Adam Winsler, professor of applied developmental psychology, followed a large and diverse sample of preschool children up until they completed sixth, seventh and eighth grade. (2019-03-12)

NYU Abu Dhabi study finds grasping motions lead by visuo-haptic signals are most effective
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have found that the availability of both visual and haptic information for a target object significantly improves reach-to-grasp actions, demonstrating that the nervous system utilizes both types of information to optimize movement execution. The findings are featured in the journal Scientific Reports. (2019-03-06)

Singing for science: How the arts can help students who struggle most
Incorporating the arts -- rapping, dancing, drawing -- into science lessons can help low-achieving students retain more knowledge and possibly help students of all ability levels be more creative in their learning, finds a new study by Johns Hopkins University. (2019-03-05)

Let's dance!
Research shows that dance supports wellbeing, improves group spirit, and boosts learning. The Finnish research initiative ArtsEqual has released a recommendation stating that school children should have more opportunities to engage in dance and bodily expression as part of their school curriculum. (2019-02-19)

NYUAD study suggests that 'Actin' is critical in genome regulation during nerve cell formation
One of the most fascinating questions in biology is how genes are regulated during development and differentiation when cells acquire a specific identity. This research suggests for the first time that Actin is critical in regulating the genome during 'neurogenesis' -- which involves the formation of 'neurons' or nerve cells. The methodology employed in this study will enable researchers to model neurogenesis, and eventually, provide a new perspective to understand disease at the molecular level. (2018-12-31)

OU sociologist examines attitudes toward LGT individuals in new study
A University of Oklahoma sociologist, Meredith G. F. Worthen, examines how measures of social contact and social distancing relate to attitudes toward lesbian, gay and transgender individuals in a new study. Worthen uses a scale she developed and data from college students in the United States (Oklahoma and Texas), Italy and Spain to offer the first cross-cultural comparisons of attitudes toward transgender people in the United States and European Union. (2018-10-23)

Scientists reveal drumming helps schoolchildren diagnosed with autism
Children diagnosed with autism perform better in school if they participate in two 30-minute drumming sessions a week, according to a new scientific study. (2018-09-14)

Adolescents whose religious mothers die are likely to be less religious as young adults
Bereaved children whose late mothers were very religious are likely to be less religious after their mother dies than youths who did not suffer a maternal loss. Conversely, children whose late mothers placed no importance on religion are more likely to become religious -- especially when it comes to praying often. (2018-09-11)

Video-based ethics program increases moral awareness, study finds
Ethics Unwrapped, a video-based behavioral ethics curriculum created at The University of Texas at Austin and adopted by educational institutions around the world, effectively increases student understanding of ethics and human behavior, according to a study published today in the Journal of Business Law and Ethics Pedagogy. The study was based on a two-year survey of approximately 8,600 UT undergraduates. (2018-08-13)

More category 5 hurricanes forecasted by scientists
Researchers at Chapman University have learned from studying 2012's Hurricane Sandy, that we are more likely to see larger, more powerful hurricanes in the future. (2018-07-18)

Global surface area of rivers and streams is 45 percent higher than previously thought
Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Texas A&M University used satellite images, on-the-ground measurements and a statistical model to determine how much of the earth is covered by rivers and streams. They found that global river and stream surface area is about 45 percent greater than what was indicated by previous studies. (2018-06-28)

The same characteristics can be acquired differently when it comes to neurons
Distinct molecular mechanisms can generate the same features in different neurons, a team of scientists has discovered. Its findings enhance our understanding of brain cell development. (2018-06-14)

Study links content of service members' art to their trauma levels
A new study conducted at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence found that military service members recovering from PTSD who still identified as a member of a unit have lower levels of psychological injuries. (2018-06-12)

UTA study finds art therapy helps veterans cope with trauma
Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have found that 98 percent of veterans participating in the University's Artopia program consider that art therapy helped them cope with service-related trauma or disability. An equal percentage reported that art therapy helped them cope with everyday life. (2018-05-09)

Arts and culture could help Finnish schools reach new heights of excellence
Finland has one of the best education systems in the world. If Finnish schools wished to reach a new level of excellence, they should strengthen the integration of arts and culture in the teaching of all subjects, researchers now say. (2018-05-03)

New study finds genetic evidence that magnetic navigation guides loggerhead sea turtles
New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides valuable insight into the navigation and nesting behaviors of loggerhead sea turtles that could inform future conservation efforts. Loggerhead sea turtles that nest on beaches with similar magnetic fields are genetically similar to one another, according to a new study by UNC-Chapel Hill biologists Kenneth Lohmann and Roger Brothers. The study will be published in the journal Current Biology on April 12. (2018-04-12)

Ohio University study shows high number of concussion-related symptoms in performing arts
A recent study released by the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows a stunning number of participants not only experienced concussion-related symptoms and head impacts but also continued performing either without reporting the incident or without receiving the recommended care. These participants were not taking part in any sporting contest at the time, however. They are theater personnel. (2018-04-03)

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