Current Assessments News and Events

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Biological assessment of world's rivers presents incomplete but bleak picture
An international team of scientists, including two from Oregon State University, conducted a biological assessment of the world's rivers and the limited data they found presents a fairly bleak picture. (2021-02-21)

Brain-related visual problems may affect one in 30 primary school children
A brain-related visual impairment, which until recently was thought to be rare, may affect one in every 30 children according to new research investigating the prevalence of Cerebral Visual Impairment [CVI]. The University of Bristol-led findings published today [3 February] in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, aim to raise awareness of CVI among parents and teachers to help them identify signs of the condition earlier. (2021-02-03)

Smartwatch sensors enable remote monitoring & treatment guidance for Parkinson's patients
Scientists have developed a monitoring system based on commercial smartwatches that can detect movement issues and tremors in patients with Parkinson's disease. (2021-02-03)

Mammogram-based breast cancer risk model could lead to better screening guidelines
A new machine learning algorithm based on mammograms can estimate the risk of breast cancer in women more accurately than current risk models, according to a study from Adam Yala and colleagues. (2021-01-27)

When a story is breaking, AI can help consumers identify fake news
Warnings about misinformation are now regularly posted on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media platforms, but not all of these cautions are created equal. New research from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute shows that artificial intelligence can help form accurate news assessments -- but only when a news story is first emerging. (2021-01-21)

Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts. (2021-01-12)

Scientists identify workflow algorithm to predict psychosis
Cleverly combining artificial and human intelligence leads to improved prevention of psychosis in young patients (2021-01-09)

Research uses a video game to identify attention deficit symptoms
Adapting a traditional endless runner video game and using a raccoon as the protagonist, researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM, in its Spanish acronym), among other institutions, have developed a platform that allows the identification and evaluation of the degree of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. (2020-12-21)

Mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain may not deliver the desired outcomes for nature
England's proposed mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain requirement for new developments might not deliver on promises to increase biodiversity, according to research being presented at British Ecological Society's Festival of Ecology. (2020-12-16)

A biased evaluation of employees' performance can be useful for employers
In assessing an employee's performance, employers often listen to his immediate supervisor or colleagues, and these opinions can be highly subjective. Sergey Stepanov, an economist from HSE University, has shown that biased evaluations can actually benefit employers. An article substantiating this finding was published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization. (2020-12-10)

Significant increase in depression seen among children during first UK lockdown
The first lockdown led to a significant increase in symptoms of depression among children, highlighting the unintended consequences of school closures, according to a new study from the University of Cambridge. (2020-12-08)

Worst-case emissions projections are already off-track
New University of Colorado Boulder research reveals that emissions are not growing as fast as the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's assessments have indicated--and that the IPCC is not using the most up-to-date climate scenarios in its planning and policy recommendations. (2020-11-30)

COVID-19 second wave in Myanmar causes dramatic increases in poverty
New evidence combining surveys from urban and rural Myanmar and simulation analysis find COVID-19 second wave dramatically increasing poverty and food insecurity. (2020-11-24)

New report projects severe coral bleaching globally in this century
MIAMI--The United Nations recently released a new report projecting future coral reef bleaching globally. The lead author of the report, Ruben van Hooidonk, is a scientist with NOAA's Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Studies based at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. (2020-11-20)

Monitoring glaucoma at home
Glaucoma is a chronic condition that affects cells at the back of the eye. It is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. People with glaucoma, or at risk of developing glaucoma, require lifelong monitoring, including regular eye tests to track the progression of the disease. A study from City, University of London is the first in the world that suggests glaucoma eye tests can be performed accurately at home by patients themselves. (2020-11-20)

Study finds some sport fish are caught repeatedly - which may throw off population count
A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated. The findings raise some interesting questions for policy makers tasked with preserving sustainable fisheries. (2020-11-17)

Most Medicare beneficiaries say they don't receive cognitive assessments
In a survey of Medicare beneficiaries, approximately one-half reported having an annual wellness visit, but only about a quarter of total respondents reported receiving a structured cognitive assessment at an annual wellness visit, even though, under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), detection of cognitive impairment is a required component of the visit. (2020-11-13)

Job interest not a big predictor of job satisfaction
Interest in an occupation matters, but not as much as you might think when it comes to job satisfaction. While it's not a strong predictor of satisfaction, a University of Houston researcher found that it may help in your performance on the job. (2020-11-11)

Researchers take a stand on algorithm design for job centers: Landing a job isn't always the right goal
Algorithms that assess the risk of citizens becoming unemployed are currently being tested in a number of Danish municipalities. But according to a new study from the University of Copenhagen, gaining employment is not the only relevant goal for those out of work -- nor should it be for an algorithm. (2020-10-29)

Study highlights shortcomings in telemedicine despite large increases in remote consults during COVID-19 pandemic
Despite increased use of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans have had significantly fewer consultations with primary care doctors and markedly fewer assessments of common cardiac risk factors. (2020-10-02)

Artificial intelligence can help protect orchids and other species
Many orchid species are threatened by land conversion and illegal harvesting. However, only a fraction of those species is included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, because assessments require a lot of time, resources and expertise. A new approach, an automated assessment developed under the lead of biodiversity researchers from Central Germany, now shows that almost 30% of all orchid species are possibly threatened. The new approach could speed up conservation assessments of all species on Earth. (2020-09-28)

VAT cuts do not increase consumer purchasing power
An empirical study published in the Journal of Political Economy finds that VAT cuts are less likely to be passed on to consumer prices than VAT hikes. Following a temporary VAT cut, prices can even be higher than on onset. (2020-09-01)

Amateur drone videos could aid in natural disaster damage assessment
It wasn't long after Hurricane Laura hit the Gulf Coast Thursday that people began flying drones to record the damage and posting videos on social media. Those videos are a precious resource, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, who are working on ways to use them for rapid damage assessment. By using artificial intelligence, the researchers are developing a system that can automatically identify buildings and make an initial determination of whether they are damaged and how serious that damage might be. (2020-08-28)

High intensity physical activity in early life could lead to stronger bones in adulthood
High intensity physical activity in early life might help maximise peak hip strength and prevent osteoporosis in later life, according to a study published today in JAMA Network Open from researchers at the University of Bristol. (2020-08-18)

'Worst-case' CO2 emissions scenario is best for assessing climate risk and impacts to 2050
The RCP 8.5 carbon emissions pathway is the most appropriate for conducting assessments of climate change impacts by 2050, according to a new article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Long dismissed as an alarmist or misleading worst-case scenario, the authors argue that is actually the closest approximation of both historical emissions and anticipated outcomes of current global climate policies, tracking within 1% of actual emissions. (2020-08-03)

Eye-tracking tech helps aged care assessment
Memory loss among older Australians is on the rise as the Baby Boomer generation enters retirement - but a new technique tested by Flinders University researchers that investigates cognitive skills through eye-tracking technology may be used to help incorporate all older people's preferences into aged care policy and practice. (2020-08-03)

New blood test shows great promise in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease
A new blood test demonstrated remarkable promise in discriminating between persons with and without Alzheimer's disease and in persons at known genetic risk may be able to detect the disease as early as 20 years before the onset of cognitive impairment, according to a large international study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and simultaneously presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. (2020-07-28)

Incoming CEOs with premium pay packages perform accordingly, study shows
New research from the University of Notre Dame examines how compensation for incoming chief executives -- which serves as a sign of the board's upfront confidence in the CEO's ability -- is related to subsequent performance in the years that follow. (2020-07-06)

Ceftolozane/tazobactam: New treatment option for severe infections, but no proof of superiority
Ceftolozane/tazobactam: new treatment option for severe infections, but no proof of superiority New antibiotic broadens the treatment options for severe infections and resistances. However, there is no evidence of advantages or disadvantages in comparison with other antibiotics. (2020-07-02)

Need to check patient's jugular venous pressure? There's an app for that
A new report from cardiologists at UT Southwestern raises the hope that doctors will be able to visually check the jugular venous pressure of heart failure patients remotely, using the camera on a smartphone. The finding is especially timely as telemedicine expands during the pandemic. (2020-07-01)

Are protected areas effective at maintaining large carnivore populations?
A recent study, led by the University of Helsinki, used a novel combination of statistical methods and an exceptional data set collected by hunters to assess the role of protected areas for carnivore conservation in Finland. (2020-06-22)

Ribociclib in breast cancer: Added benefit for certain women after menopause
After expiry of the G-BA decisions, IQWiG reassessed the drug in two combinations. The new data cut-offs used for this purpose confirm both advantages and disadvantages. (2020-06-05)

Vision and balance issues are common in elementary school-age children with a concussion
In a new study, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have performed the most comprehensive characterization of elementary school-age concussions to date, revealing an opportunity to improve outcomes for this age group through more consistent visio-vestibular assessments at the initial health care visit. (2020-06-04)

Not children, but 'super-happy families' the aim of assisted reproduction
Researcher Judith Lind has studied how staff at fertility clinics view the assessments that childless couples and women undergo in order to access assisted reproduction. It emerges in the interviews that the assessment of the potential parents is based on the child's future welfare and on the responsible use of public resources. (2020-06-04)

Genetic risk scores may improve clinical identification of patients with heart attack risk
Researchers at Mass General and the Broad Institute have found that applying polygenic risk scores can identify patients at risk of a heart attack who may be missed in standard clinical evaluations. (2020-06-02)

Better prepared for future crises
Although there were early warnings of an exponentially growing pandemic, most policymakers around the world were unprepared and reluctant to act when Covid-19 first spread from China around the world. In an article published in the Journal of Risk Research, Aengus Collins, Marie-Valentine Florin (both EPFL International Risk Governance Center) and IASS Scientific Director Ortwin Renn analyze the key factors and offer recommendations on how we can better prepare for future crises. (2020-05-29)

Methodology for credibility assessment of historical global LUCC datasets
A study of the methodology for credibility assessment of historical global LUCC datasets has been published in SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences recently. It proposed a methodological framework that addresses temporal as well as spatial changes in the amount and distribution of land cover and outlined four approaches based on the accuracy, rationality and likelihood assessments illustrated through five case studies. (2020-05-28)

How a network of hospitals reduced average age at cerebral palsy diagnosis to 9.5 months
Five hospital systems in the United States have become the first in the world to successfully implement, in clinical practice, international CP diagnosis guidelines that were released in 2017. Their efforts, which resulted in an average decrease of 10 months in time-to-diagnosis, demonstrate the practicality and effectiveness of the guidelines for improving age at diagnosis. (2020-05-27)

Balancing impacts of range-shifting species: Invasives vs biodiversity
For many years, the conservation community has embraced the idea that improving connectivity, that is, creating corridors so species can follow their preferred climate, will benefit biodiversity, says Toni Lyn Morelli at UMass Amherst's Climate Adaptation Science Center. But, ''I also work with invasive species experts and conservationists who know that new species can be problematic.'' One community says species arrivals are good, the other one says species arrivals are bad, and they aren't talking to each other. (2020-04-30)

International team develops new model to improve accuracy of storm surge analysis
A new international study published this week in the journal Nature Communications, applied a novel statistical method that -- for the first time -- captures the important interactions between tides and storm surges. These natural forces are caused by meteorological effects, such as strong winds and low atmospheric pressure, and their impacts have often been difficult to understand because of the complexity of Mother Nature. (2020-04-21)

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