Current Assisted Reproduction News and Events

Current Assisted Reproduction News and Events, Assisted Reproduction News Articles.
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COVID-19 infection in pregnancy not linked with still birth or baby death
COVID-19 infection in pregnancy is not associated with stillbirth or early neonatal death, according to a new study. (2021-02-22)

In dueling ants vying to become queen, behavioral and molecular cues quickly determine who will win
In one species of ants, workers duel to establish new leadership after the death of their queen. While these sparring matches stretch for more than a month, changes in behavior and gene expression in the first three days of dueling can accurately predict who will triumph, according to a New York University study published in the journal Genes & Development. (2021-02-18)

IU study finds unintended consequences of state, opioid policies
Study reveals the unintended and negative consequences of policies designed to reduce the supply of opioids in the population for overdose. (2021-02-17)

Friends fur life help build skills for life
A new UBC Okanagan study finds children not only reap the benefits of working with therapy dogs-they enjoy it too. (2021-02-17)

Covid-19 vs conservation - how the northern white rhino rescue programme overcame challenges
The COVID-19 pandemic - caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 - has changed the life of people everywhere and affected economic, cultural, social and political processes. Research and conservation are not exempt from these negative effects, whereas positive consequences of an ''anthropause'' on the environment are controversially discussed. (2021-02-09)

New AI tool can thwart coronavirus mutations
USC computer scientists used AI to create a new tool that rapidly identifies potential solutions to coronavirus mutations and screens vaccines much faster to give humans an advantage over the contagion. (2021-02-05)

Zinc may help with fertility during COVID-19 pandemic, researchers report
Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers have reported that zinc supplements for men and women attempting to conceive either naturally or through assisted reproduction during the COVID-19 pandemic may prevent mitochondrial damage in young egg and sperm cells. (2021-02-04)

Ostriches challenged by temperature fluctuations
The world's largest bird, the ostrich, has problems reproducing when the temperature deviates by 5 degrees or more from the ideal temperature of 20 °C. The research, from Lund University in Sweden, is published in Nature Communications. (2021-02-03)

Titanium oxide nanotubes facilitate low-cost laser-assisted photoporation
Toyohashi University of Technology developed a nanosecond pulse laser-assisted photoporation method using titanium-oxide nanotubes (TNTs) for highly efficient and low-cost intracellular delivery. HeLa - human cervical cancer cells were cultured in the nanotubes and submerged in a solution of biomolecules. After cells were exposed to nanosecond pulse laser, we successfully delivered propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescent dextran into cells with high efficiency and cell viability. (2021-01-25)

A critical review of graphene quantum dots and their application in biosensors
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from Hubei, China discuss the top-down and bottom-up strategies for the synthesis of Graphene quantum dots (GQDs). The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are summarized. With regard to some important or novel ones, the mechanisms are proposed for reference. In addition, the application of GQDs in biosensors is highlighted in detail. (2021-01-20)

Scientists produce the first in-vitro embryos from vitrified African lion oocytes
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Germany, Givskud Zoo - Zootopia in Denmark and the University of Milan in Italy succeeded in producing the very first African lion in-vitro embryos after the vitrification of immature oocytes. (2021-01-18)

Genital shape key to male flies' sexual success
Having genitals of a certain shape and size gives male flies a major reproductive advantage, new research shows. (2021-01-15)

Unexplained 7-fold variation in euthanasia rates across the Netherlands
There's a 7-fold unexplained variation in rates of euthanasia across The Netherlands, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data, published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. (2021-01-14)

Shedding light on the secret reproductive lives of honey bees
Research at NC State and the University of British Columbia shows that there are trade-offs between sperm viability and the expression of a protein involved in the insect's immune response. (2021-01-13)

Higher live birth rates found after transferring fresh rather than frozen embryos...
Leveraging national data from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART), the Brigham researchers found that, in cycles using freshly retrieved donor eggs, fresh embryo transfers were indeed associated with significantly higher live birth rates compared to frozen embryo transfers. The team's findings are published in JAMA. (2021-01-12)

NIH study suggests using cannabis while trying to conceive may reduce pregnancy chances
Women who use marijuana could have a more difficult time conceiving a child than women who do not use marijuana, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Marijuana use among the women's partners--which could have influenced conception rates--was not studied. (2021-01-11)

Researchers realize efficient generation of high-dimensional quantum teleportation
In a study published in Physical Review Letters, the team led by academician GUO Guangcan from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) made progress in high dimensional quantum teleportation. The researchers demonstrated the teleportation of high-dimensional states in a three-dimensional six-photon system. (2021-01-08)

New hard disk write head analytical technology can increase hard disk capacities
Using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8 - a large-scale synchrotron radiation facility - Tohoku University, Toshiba Corporation, and the Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI) have successfully imaged the magnetization dynamics of a hard disk drive (HDD) write head for the first time, with a precision of one ten-billionth of a second. The method makes possible precise analysis of write head operations, accelerating the development of the next-generation write heads and further increasing HDD capacity. (2021-01-07)

Genomes reveal insights into much-loved Aussie animals
Researchers have brought together expertise in bioinformatics, cytogenetics, developmental and molecular biology to produce and analyse the first ever echidna genome and a greatly improved, high quality platypus genome sequence. (2021-01-07)

Risk of extinction cascades from freshwater mussels to a bitterling fish
Reproduction of native and invasive bitterling fishes and their hybridisation was studied in Japan. We collected mussels in which these bitterlings lay their eggs, kept them in aquaria, collected eggs/larvae ejected from mussels, and genotyped them. We found that hybrids occurred when local mussel density was low. The rapid decline of the host mussels and artificial introduction of an invasive congener interacted to cause the rapid decline of a native fish. (2021-01-04)

Climate warming linked to tree leaf unfolding and flowering growing apart
Climate warming is linked to a widening interval between leaf unfolding and flowering in European trees, with implications for tree fitness and the wider environment, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Ecology. (2020-12-21)

Silkworm's brain determines diapause by thermal information
Silkworms (Bombyx mori) were found to lay diapause eggs at 25°C and non-diapause eggs at 15°C. Females were observed to determine whether to lay diapause eggs or not according to thermal information received by the embryonic Bombyx TRPA1 ortholog (BmTRPA1). In this study scientists at Shinshu University et al. have elucidated that the neuropeptide corazonin regulates the release of the diapause hormone. (2020-12-21)

Genetic exchange discovered in anciently asexual rotifers
Skoltech's evolutionary biologists discovered recombination in bdelloid rotifers, microscopic freshwater invertebrates, which have long been regarded as 'an evolutionary scandal' due to their presumed ancient asexuality. The existence of such anciently asexual groups calls into question the hypothesis that sexual reproduction is indispensable for long-term evolutionary success of species. However, the recent study published in Nature Communications provides evidence of recombination and genetic exchange in bdelloids. (2020-12-18)

Skinnier but resilient geese thriving in the high Arctic
Barnacle geese in the Arctic have been on a diet. So many now migrate to northern breeding grounds that in some places there's less food to go around. The good news is that it doesn't seem to restrict their population growth -- yet. (2020-12-17)

Long-term study of gene therapy technique in monkeys finds no adverse health effects
A decade after the birth of the first primates born with the aid of a gene therapy technique designed to prevent inherited mitochondrial disease, a careful study of the monkeys and their offspring reveals no adverse health effects. The new study generally bolsters the scientific basis for mitochondrial replacement therapy in human clinical trials, with an important caveat: Researchers found varying levels of carryover maternal mitochondrial DNA that had preferentially replicated and accumulated within some internal organs, although not enough to cause health effects. (2020-12-08)

IVF boost: Monash researchers use acoustic waves to select high quality sperm
Monash University researchers have used acoustic waves to develop a new approach to separate high-quality sperm for assisted reproduction. These findings can open windows for infertile couples to have a family of their own using IVF. The procedure can process roughly 140 sperm per second and select more than 60,000 high-quality sperm in under 50 minutes - nearly four times faster than the current gold standard. (2020-12-04)

Researchers find 'missing link'
Otago researchers have found the ''missing link between stress and infertility''. (2020-12-03)

This 3D printer doesn't gloss over the details
A new 3D printing system designed by MIT researchers enables realistic variations in glossiness across a 3D printed surface. The advance could aid fine art reproduction and the design of prosthetics. (2020-12-02)

Chemical memory in plants affects chances of offspring survival
Researchers at the University of Warwick have uncovered the mechanism that allows plants to pass on their 'memories' to offspring, which results in growth and developmental defects. (2020-12-01)

How to spot winning sperm: examine their racing stripes
Millions of sperm enter the race to fertilize, but only one wins the sprint to the egg. Now Yale researchers have discovered that these winning sperm possess a few key molecular characteristics that differentiate them from those left behind, they report Dec. 1 in the journal eLife. (2020-12-01)

The number of times a person gives birth may affect how quickly they age
Having children doesn't just make you feel like you've aged overnight -- a new study led by Penn State researchers found that the number of times a person gives birth may also affect the body's physical aging process. (2020-11-30)

Warwick scientists design model to predict cellular drug targets against COVID-19
A computational model of a human lung cell has been used to understand how SARS-CoV-2 draws on human host cell metabolism to reproduce by researchers at the University of Warwick. This study helps understand how the virus uses the host to survive, and enable drug predictions for treating the virus to be made. (2020-11-25)

Face masks slow spread of COVID-19; types of masks, length of use matter
Using face masks to help slow the spread of COVID-19 has been widely recommended by health professionals. This has triggered studies of the materials, design, and other issues affecting the way face masks work. In Physics of Fluids, investigators looked at research on face masks and their use and summarized what we know about the way they filter or block the virus. They also summarize design issues that still need to be addressed. (2020-11-24)

Frozen eggs and ovarian tissue helped women conceive children after breast cancer
Women with breast cancer whose eggs or ovarian tissue were frozen had more children after their diagnosis than women who did not undergo fertility preservation using those methods before start of cancer treatment. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that is published in the journal JAMA Oncology. According to the researchers, the result highlights the importance of reproductive counseling and fertility preservation for women who are diagnosed with cancer at a young age. (2020-11-19)

Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate 'live fast and die young', new research shows. (2020-11-17)

Exoskeleton-assisted walking improves mobility in individuals with spinal cord injury
''Participants showed improvement regardless of level of injury, completeness, or duration of injury,'' noted Dr. Forrest, ''indicating that exoskeletons can be used to improve mobility across a broad spectrum of individuals with neurological deficits caused by spinal cord injury. Our results can be used to guide the application of exoskeletons to spinal cord injury rehabilitation, and the timely acquisition of skills for the safe use of these devices for rehabilitation and community use.'' (2020-11-12)

Selective encapsulation of ultrafine Pd and Pt nanoparticles within the shallow layers of MOF
A solvent assisted ligand exchange-hydrogen reduction (SALE-HR) strategy is demonstrated to selectively encapsulate ultrafine metal nanoparticles (Pd or Pt) within the shallow layers of a MOF, i.e., UiO-67, for highly efficient hydrogenation reactions. (2020-11-11)

Noise and light alter bird nesting habits and success
By analyzing nesting data from across the contiguous US, the authors found widespread impacts of noise and light pollution on bird nesting habits and success. Birds that live in forests were most sensitive to noise pollution, as were those with low frequency songs. Sensitivity to light pollution was strongly linked to variation in low light vision. The results reveal traits and contexts indicative of sensitivities to these stimuli that can be used for conservation planning. (2020-11-11)

Getting single-crystal diamond ready for electronics
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners polished single-crystal diamond to near-atomic smoothness without damaging it. This will improve the performance and sustainability of future electronics. (2020-11-10)

Simultaneous kidney transplant plus weight loss surgery safe for obese patients
A new study shows that robotic-assisted kidney transplant and weight loss surgery can be performed safely. (2020-11-10)

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