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Current Astrophysics News and Events, Astrophysics News Articles.
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Astronomers detect regular rhythm of radio waves, with origins unknown
Astronomers detect a regular pattern of radio bursts from 500 million light years away. (2020-06-17)

Why pulsars shine bright: A half-century-old mystery solved
Pulsars act like stellar lighthouses, shooting beams of radio waves from their magnetic poles. The cause of those beams has remained a mystery for more than 50 years. Now, a team of researchers suspects that they've finally identified the mechanism responsible: Newborn particles interact with the stars' powerful electromagnetic fields, generating intense radio emissions, the team's simulations suggest. The discovery could aid projects that rely on pulsar emissions, such as studies of gravitational waves. (2020-06-15)

Viewing the topology of thermonuclear reaction in nuclear landscape from the network perspective
Nucleosynthesis is a complicated process in astrophysics. By constructing a directed, un-weighted, multilayer nuclear reaction network, which consisted of all nuclides and reactions within the JINA REACLIB database, researchers in Shanghai have investigated important topological features as well as identified the most frequent reaction patterns of the interconnections that occurred amongst the different nuclides in nuclear landscape, i.e. motif structures of nuclear reactions. (2020-06-08)

Astronomers predict bombardment from asteroids and comets in another planetary system
The planetary system around star HR8799 is remarkably similar to our Solar System. A research team led by astronomers from the University of Groningen and SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research has used this similarity to model the delivery of materials by asteroids, comets and other minor bodies within the system. Their simulation shows that the four gas planets receive material delivered by minor bodies, just like in our Solar System. (2020-05-29)

Mergers between galaxies trigger activity in their core
Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) play a major role in galaxy evolution. Astronomers from the University of Groningen and SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research have now used a record-sized sample of galaxies to confirm that galaxy mergers have a positive effect on igniting AGNs. They were able to compile about ten times more images of merging galaxies than previous studies by using a machine-learning algorithm. The results were published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. (2020-05-28)

Astronomers see 'cosmic ring of fire,' 11 billion years ago
Astronomers have captured an image of a super-rare type of galaxy -- described as a 'cosmic ring of fire' -- as it existed 11 billion years ago. (2020-05-25)

Powerful new AI technique detects and classifies galaxies in astronomy image data
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a powerful new computer program called Morpheus that can analyze astronomical image data pixel by pixel to identify and classify all of the galaxies and stars in large data sets from astronomy surveys. Morpheus is a deep-learning framework that incorporates a variety of artificial intelligence technologies developed for applications such as image and speech recognition. (2020-05-12)

An eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar discovered by FAST
Using the data obtained by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), a research team led by Professor PAN Zhichen and Prof. LI Di from the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) discovered an eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar in Globular Cluster (GC) Messier 92 (M92). (2020-04-24)

Beacon in space: BRITE Constellation observes complete nova eruption for the first time
Satellite images from the BRITE mission with the participation of researchers from TU Graz and the Universities of Innsbruck and Vienna document for the first time the complete development of a nova - from eruption to maximum brightness and burn out. The publication has now appeared in the journal Nature Astronomy. (2020-04-14)

Doubts about basic assumption for the universe
No matter where we look, the same rules apply everywhere in space: countless calculations of astrophysics are based on this basic principle. A recent study by the Universities of Bonn and Harvard, however, has thrown this principle into question. Should the measured values be confirmed, this would toss many assumptions about the properties of the universe overboard. The results are published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, but are already available online. (2020-04-08)

Researchers discover new information on interstellar magnetic field in solar neighborhood
An international research team led by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Turku, Finland, mapped the interstellar magnetic field structure and interstellar matter distribution in the solar neighbourhood. The results of the study have been published in the esteemed European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) in March, 2020. (2020-04-08)

Are gamma-ray bursts powered by a star's collapsing magnetic fields?
In its final moments of life, a distant massive star releases an intense burst of high-energy gamma radiation - a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) - the brightest sources of energy in the universe, detectable to humans through powerful telescopes. Scientists have long been divided over what powers these extraordinary explosions. Now research from the University of Bath suggests a dying star's collapsing magnetic field may hold the answers. (2020-04-07)

ALMA resolves gas impacted by young jets from supermassive black hole
Astronomers obtained the first resolved image of disturbed gaseous clouds in a galaxy 11 billion light-years away by using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The team found that the disruption is caused by young powerful jets ejected from a supermassive black hole residing at the center of the host galaxy. This result will cast light on the mystery of the evolutionary process of galaxies in the early Universe. (2020-03-27)

Black hole team discovers path to razor-sharp black hole images
A team of researchers have published new calculations that predict a striking and intricate substructure within black hole images from extreme gravitational light bending. (2020-03-18)

What can you do with spiral graph? Help understand how galaxies evolve
Researchers at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences have developed a technique to accurately measure the winding arms of spiral galaxies that is so easy, virtually anyone can participate. This new and simple method is currently being applied in a citizen science project, called Spiral Graph, that takes advantage of a person's innate ability to recognize patterns, and ultimately could provide researchers with some insight into how galaxies evolve. (2020-03-13)

Argonne's pioneering user facility to add magic number factory
A forthcoming N = 126 Factory will investigate one of the great questions in physics and chemistry: how were the heavy elements from iron to uranium created? (2020-03-06)

Deconstructing Schrödinger's cat
So far, many physicists have attempted to explain the problem of quantum superposition, as exemplified by Schrödinger's cat. The French theoretical physicist Franck Leloë proposes a possible solution, which combines two different approaches and brings in universal gravitation, in a novel paper in EPJ D. (2020-02-14)

The core of massive dying galaxies already formed 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang
The most distant dying galaxy discovered so far, more massive than our Milky Way -- with more than a trillion stars -- has revealed that the 'cores' of these systems had formed already 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang, about 1 billion years earlier than previous measurements revealed. The discovery will add to our knowledge on the formation of the Universe more generally, and may cause the computer models astronomers use, one of the most fundamental tools, to be revised (2020-01-17)

Astronomers discover class of strange objects near our galaxy's enormous black hole
UCLA astronomers have discovered a new class of bizarre objects at the center of our galaxy, not far from the supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A*. 'Mergers of stars may be happening in the universe more often than we thought, and likely are quite common,' said Andrea Ghez, UCLA's Lauren B. Leichtman and Arthur E. Levine Professor of Astrophysics. She believes the objects were binary stars that merged because of the black hole's gravitational force. (2020-01-15)

X-rays and gravitational waves will combine to illuminate massive black hole collisions
A new study by a group of researchers at the University of Birmingham has found that collisions of supermassive black holes may be simultaneously observable in both gravitational waves and X-rays at the beginning of the next decade. (2020-01-14)

NASA planet hunter finds its 1st Earth-size habitable-zone world
NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered its first Earth-size planet in its star's habitable zone, the range of distances where conditions may be just right to allow the presence of liquid water on the surface. (2020-01-07)

Fast radio burst observations deepen astronomical mystery
Observations with the 8-meter Gemini North telescope, a program of the NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, have allowed astronomers to pinpoint the location of a Fast Radio Burst in a nearby galaxy -- making it the closest known example to Earth and only the second repeating burst source to have its location pinpointed in the sky. (2020-01-07)

The Milky Way's impending galactic collision is already birthing new stars
The Milky Way's outskirts are home to its oldest stars. But astronomers have spotted something unexpected in this celestial retirement community: much younger stars. Furthermore, analysis suggests that the stars didn't form from material from the Milky Way, but rather from two dwarf galaxies on a collision course with our galaxy. The discovery suggests that a stream of gas extending ahead of the galaxies will crash into the Milky Way sooner than previously thought. (2020-01-07)

GMRT discovers a gigantic ring of hydrogen gas around a distant galaxy
A team of astronomers at the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA-TIFR) in Pune, India, have recently discovered an extremely large ring composed primarily of neutral hydrogen gas around a distant galaxy named AGC 203001 using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). This ring happens to be only the second known example of such elusive rings whose origin remains a matter of debate among astrophysicists. (2020-01-02)

ESO observations reveal black holes' breakfast at the cosmic dawn
Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have observed reservoirs of cool gas around some of the earliest galaxies in the universe. These gas halos are the perfect food for supermassive black holes at the center of these galaxies, which are now seen as they were over 12.5 billion years ago. This food storage might explain how these cosmic monsters grew so fast during a period in the universe's history known as the Cosmic Dawn. (2019-12-19)

Astrophysics and AI may offer key to early dementia diagnosis
Crucial early diagnosis of dementia in general practice could improve thanks to a computer model designed in a collaboration between Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) and astrophysicists at the University of Sussex. (2019-12-17)

ESO telescope images stunning central region of Milky Way, finds ancient star burst
ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has observed the central part of the Milky Way with spectacular resolution and uncovered new details about the history of star birth in our galaxy. Thanks to the new observations, astronomers have found evidence for a dramatic event in the life of the Milky Way: a burst of star formation so intense that it resulted in over a 100,000 supernova explosions. (2019-12-16)

NASA's NICER delivers best-ever pulsar measurements, 1st surface map
Astrophysicists are redrawing the textbook image of pulsars (the dense, whirling remains of exploded stars) thanks to NICER, an X-ray telescope aboard the International Space Station. NICER data has provided the first precise and dependable measurements of both a pulsar's size and its mass, and the first-ever map of hot spots on its surface. (2019-12-12)

Chinese Academy of Sciences leads discovery of unpredicted stellar black hole
An international team, headed by Professor LIU Jifeng of the National Astronomical Observatory of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), spotted a stellar black hole with a mass 70 times greater than the Sun. The monster black hole is located 15,000 light-years from Earth and has been named LB-1 by the researchers. (2019-11-27)

The simultaneous merging of giant galaxies
An international research team led by scientists from Göttingen and Potsdam proved for the first time that the galaxy NGC 6240 contains three supermassive black holes. The unique observations, published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, show the black holes close to each other in the core of the galaxy. The study points to simultaneous merging processes during the formation of the largest galaxies in the universe. (2019-11-21)

Hubble studies gamma-ray burst with the highest energy ever seen
New observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have investigated the nature of the gamma-ray burst GRB 190114C. (2019-11-20)

Hubble studies gamma-ray burst with highest energy ever seen
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has given astronomers a peek at the location of the most energetic outburst ever seen in the universe -- a blast of gamma-rays a trillion times more powerful than visible light. That's because in a few seconds the gamma-ray burst (GRB) emitted more energy than the Sun will provide over its entire 10-billion year life. (2019-11-20)

Spin doctors: Astrophysicists find when galaxies rotate, size matters
The direction in which a galaxy spins depends on its mass, researchers have found. (2019-11-14)

NASA's TESS presents panorama of southern sky
The glow of the Milky Way -- our galaxy seen edgewise -- arcs across a sea of stars in a new mosaic of the southern sky produced from a year of observations by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). Constructed from 208 TESS images, the panorama reveals both the beauty of the cosmic landscape and the reach of TESS's cameras. (2019-11-05)

Simulations explain giant exoplanets with eccentric, close-in orbits
As planetary systems evolve, gravitational interactions between planets can fling some of them into eccentric elliptical orbits around the host star. Smaller planets should be more susceptible to this gravitational scattering, yet many gas giant exoplanets have been observed with eccentric orbits. In fact, the planets with the highest masses tend to be those with the most eccentric orbits. A new study explains these counter-intuitive observations. (2019-10-30)

X-ray scout sees first light
Observations with eRosita promise a breakthrough in our understanding of the energetic universe. (2019-10-25)

Scientists observe year-long plateaus in decline of type Ia supernova light curves
A team of scientists, including a researcher from Queen's University Belfast, have discovered that the fading of infrared light following Type Ia supernovae explosions can be interrupted, with brightness staying the same for up to a year. (2019-10-07)

Not long ago, the center of the Milky Way exploded
A titanic, expanding beam of energy sprang from close to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way just 3.5 million years ago, sending a cone-shaped burst of radiation through both poles of the galaxy and out into deep space. (2019-10-06)

Giant exoplanet around tiny star challenges understanding of how planets form
An international team of researchers with participation from the University of Göttingen has discovered the first large gas giant orbiting a small star. The planet orbits the nearby red dwarf star GJ3512. This discovery challenges scientists' understanding of how planets form: low-mass stars should have less available material to form planets. Moreover, this new gas giant is on an eccentric orbit, which suggests the presence of another massive planet. The results were published in Science. (2019-09-27)

RUDN University mathematician first described the movement in a flat strip of plasma
RUDN University mathematician for the first time proved the theorem of existence and uniqueness of solutions of the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in a strip. Such theorems are very rare for partial differential equations. The new results can be applied, for instance, in astrophysics, in describing the propagation of plane waves in plasma. The article is published in the journal Nonlinear Analysis: Real World Applications. (2019-09-19)

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