Current Atomic Nucleus News and Events

Current Atomic Nucleus News and Events, Atomic Nucleus News Articles.
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New insights on how inflammatory molecule contributes to skin and pancreatic cancers
An immune molecule called interleukin-33 can act within a cell's nucleus to stimulate abnormal growth and division, ultimately resulting in cancer. Targeting interleukin-33 in the nucleus may help prevent certain cancers. (2021-02-22)

Big galaxies steal star-forming gas from their smaller neighbours
In research published today, astronomers have discovered that large galaxies are stealing the material that their smaller counterparts need to form new stars. (2021-02-22)

Atomic nuclei in the quantum swing
The extremely precise control of nuclear excitations opens up possibilities of ultra-precise atomic clocks and powerful nuclear batteries. (2021-02-19)

Study reveals how a longevity gene protects brain stem cells from stress
A gene linked to unusually long lifespans in humans protects brain stem cells from the harmful effects of stress, according to a new study by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. (2021-02-19)

A new piece of the HIV infection puzzle explored
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and Heidelberg University Hospital combine high-resolution imaging to observe the infection process in cell nuclei, opening the door for new therapeutics. (2021-02-18)

Investigating the wave properties of matter with vibrating molecules
The working group led by Prof. Stephan Schiller, Ph.D. from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has used a novel, high-precision laser spectroscopic experiment to measure the internal vibration of the simplest molecule. This allowed the researchers to investigate the wave character of the motion of atomic nuclei with unprecedented accuracy. They present their findings in the current edition of Nature Physics. (2021-02-18)

RUDN University physicists analyzed the role of gravity in elementary particles formation
Gravity might play a bigger role in the formation of elementary particles than scientists used to believe. A team of physicists from RUDN University obtained some solutions of semi-classical models that describe particle-like waves. They also calculated the ratio between the gravitational interaction of particles and the interaction of their charges. (2021-02-17)

Targeting Nsp1 protein could be a pathway for COVID-19 therapy
A study that identifies how a coronavirus protein called Nsp1 blocks the activity of genes that promote viral replication provides hope for new COVID-19 treatments. (2021-02-16)

Cells use concentration gradients as a compass
Biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch have developed a new theory, which accounts for the observation that cells can perceive their own shapes, and use this information to direct the distribution of proteins inside the cell. (2021-02-16)

Dual character of excitons in the ultrafast regime: atomic-like or solid-like?
Researchers at Politecnico di Milano in collaboration with the Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies IFN-CNR and a theory group from the Tsukuba University (Japan) and the Max Plank Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of matter (Hamburg, Germany), have discovered that an exciton can simultaneously adopt two radically different characters when it isstimulated by light. (2021-02-15)

Move over heavy goggles, here come the ultra-high refractive index lenses
POSTECH professor Junsuk Rho's research team develops a transparent silicon without visible light loss by controlling the silicon atomic structure. (2021-02-14)

How comparable different stress tests are
Scientists use many different tests to investigate what happens in the brain in people experiencing stress. It is unclear to what extent the various methods with which subjects are placed under stress are comparable to each other. In a meta-analysis, researchers compared 31 previous studies that had investigated stress using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The team worked out which regions of the brain are activated as standard during stress and which stress tests trigger similar activation patterns. (2021-02-12)

Scientists manipulate magnets at the atomic scale
Fast and energy-efficient future data processing technologies are on the horizon after an international team of scientists successfully manipulated magnets at the atomic level. Physicist Dr Rostislav Mikhaylovskiy from Lancaster University said: ''With stalling efficiency trends of current technology, new scientific approaches are especially valuable. Our discovery of the atomically-driven ultrafast control of magnetism opens broad avenues for fast and energy-efficient future data processing technologies essential to keep up with our data hunger.'' (2021-02-12)

Two-phase material with surprising properties
Some materials can couple electrical and mechanical properties - this can lead to astonishing effects: New materials have been developed, consisting of both crystalline and amorphous regions. In these special polymers, the electro-mechanical coupling suddenly disappers - scientits at TU Wien have found out how. (2021-02-08)

In-silico modelling helps with the integrated study of the intervertebral disc in health and disease
Published in the journal Bioinformatics and conducted entirely by members of the BCN MedTech Research Unit, with Laura Baumgartner as first author under the guidance of Jérôme Noailly. (2021-02-05)

How metal atoms can arrange themselves on an insulator
In order to produce tiny electronic memories or sensors in future, it is essential to be able to arrange individual metal atoms on an insulating layer. Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Chemistry have now demonstrated that this is possible at room temperature: molecules of the metal-containing compound molybdenum acetate form an ordered structure on the insulator calcite without jumping to other positions or rotating. Their findings have been presented in the Nature Communications journal. (2021-02-04)

New combination therapy offers chance of healing hepatitis B
Around 260 million people, more than three percent of the global population, are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV); in the long term, this often leads to complications such as liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. A cure is not yet possible with the available medication. Scientists at the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) and the University Hospital Eppendorf (UKE) have now investigated a new combination therapy that has proven highly effective in their infection model. (2021-02-04)

Imaging technique provides link to innovative products
A study led by University of Georgia researchers announces the successful use of a new nanoimaging technique that will allow researchers to test and identify two-dimensional materials (2021-02-04)

Researchers identify "rescue" mechanism that helps cells survive malfunctioning split
Cells replicate their genetic material and divide into two identical clones to perpetuate life. Some cells pause in the process with a single, undivided nucleus. When the cell resumes division after such a pause, the nucleus can become caught in the fissure, splitting violently, and killing both cells. But that is not always the case. Researchers from Hiroshima University in Japan are starting to understand how active nuclear displacement rescues cell death. (2021-02-03)

Solving complex physics problems at lightning speed
A calculation so complex that it takes twenty years to complete on a powerful desktop computer can now be done in one hour on a regular laptop. Physicist Andreas Ekström at Chalmers University of Technology, together with international research colleagues, has designed a new method to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei incredibly quickly. (2021-02-01)

Researchers describe a molecular mechanism involved in the pathology's neurodegeneration
Protein alteration in the family of lamins causes several diseases, known as laminopathies, such as progeria or precocious ageing. A study in which UB researchers have taken part states that alterations in the levels of one of these proteins, lamin B1, contribute to the degeneration of neuronal populations in Huntington's disease. Caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gen, this pathology features involuntary movements, cognitive deficit and psychiatric disorders, and has no cure yet. (2021-02-01)

Paving the way for effective field theories
This special issue, published in EPJ A, presents a coherent collection of work by theoretical experts from around the world regarding the use of effective field theories. Several unanswered questions are addressed and clarified, leading to detailed assessments of the philosophical foundations of effective field theories. (2021-02-01)

Researchers reveal in-situ manipulation of active Au-TiO2 interface
An international joint research team from the Shanghai Advanced Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, along with Zhejiang University and the Technical University of Denmark, reported an in-situ strategy to manipulate interfacial structure with atomic precision during catalytic reactions. (2021-01-28)

Size of helium nucleus measured more precisely than ever before
In experiments at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, an international research collaboration has measured the radius of the atomic nucleus of helium five times more precisely than ever before. With the aid of the new value, fundamental physical theories can be tested and natural constants can be determined even more precisely (2021-01-27)

VCU technology could upend DNA sequencing for diagnosing certain DNA mutations
Doctors are increasingly using genetic signatures to diagnose diseases and determine the best course of care, but using DNA sequencing and other techniques to detect genomic rearrangements remains costly or limited in capabilities. However, an innovative breakthrough developed by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Department of Physics promises to diagnose DNA rearrangement mutations at a fraction of the cost with improved accuracy. (2021-01-27)

Tungsten-substituted vanadium oxide breathes fresh air into catalyst technology
Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created a new tungsten-substituted vanadium oxide catalyst for breaking down harmful nitrogen oxides in industrial exhaust. Their new catalyst material works at lower temperatures and does not suffer major drops in performance when processing ''wet'' exhaust, resolving a major drawback in conventional vanadium oxide catalysts. They found that the unaggregated dispersal of atomic tungsten in the original crystal structure plays a key role in how it functions. (2021-01-26)

Beauty in imperfection: How crystal defects can help convert waste heat into electricity
Half-Heusler Ni-based alloys are thermoelectric materials with the potential for converting waste heat into electricity. However, the origin of their impressive conversion efficiency is not entirely clear. In a recent study, scientists from Japan and Turkey have attempted to uncover the role that Ni defects have in the crystal structure of these alloys and how their desirable thermoelectric properties are a consequence of small changes in strain around defective sites. (2021-01-26)

Change of course on the journey to the island of stability
An international research team succeeded in gaining new insights into the artificially produced superheavy element flerovium, element 114, at the accelerator facilities of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the leadership of Lund University in Sweden and with significant participation of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) as well as the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) in Germany and other partners, flerovium was produced and investigated to determine whether it has a closed proton shell. (2021-01-26)

Nuclear physicist's voyage towards a mythical island
Theories were introduced as far back as the 1960s about the possible existence of superheavy elements. Their most long-lived atomic nuclei could give rise to a so-called ''island of stability'' far beyond the element uranium. However, a new study, led by nuclear physicists at Lund University, shows that a 50-year-old nuclear physics manifesto must now be revised. (2021-01-26)

Compelling evidence of neutrino process opens physics possibilities
The COHERENT particle physics experiment at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has firmly established the existence of a new kind of neutrino interaction. Because neutrinos are electrically neutral and interact only weakly with matter, the quest to observe this interaction drove advances in detector technology and has added new information to theories aiming to explain mysteries of the cosmos. (2021-01-26)

Single atoms as a catalyst: Surprising effects ensue
Catalysts are getting smaller - ''single-atom'' catalysts are the logical end point of this downsizing. However, individual atoms can no longer be described using the rules developed from larger pieces of metal, so the rules used to predict which metals will be good catalysts must be revamped - this has now been achieved at TU Wien. As it turns out, single atom catalysts based on much cheaper materials might be even more effective. (2021-01-22)

Crystal close up
Two novel techniques, atomic-resolution real-time video and conical carbon nanotube confinement, allow researchers to view never-before-seen details about crystal formation. The observations confirm theoretical predictions about how salt crystals form and could inform general theories about the way in which crystal formation produces different ordered structures from an otherwise disordered chemical mixture. (2021-01-21)

Alpha particles lurk at the surface of neutron-rich nuclei
Scientists from an international collaboration have found evidence of alpha particles at the surface of neutron-rich heavy nuclei, providing new insights into the structure of neutron stars, as well as the process of alpha decay. (2021-01-21)

Squeezing a rock-star material could make it stable enough for solar cells
A promising lead halide perovskite is great at converting sunlight to electricity, but it breaks down at room temperature. Now scientists have discovered how to stabilize it with pressure from a diamond anvil cell. The required pressure is well within the reach of industrial manufacturing requirements. (2021-01-21)

Scientists reveal structure of plants' energy generators
Researchers have revealed the first atomic structures of the respiratory apparatus that plants use to generate energy, according to a study published today in eLife. (2021-01-19)

What stops flows in glassy materials?
Researchers from the Institute of Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology recently conducted experimental studies for the first time on glassy systems composed of nonspherical particles. (2021-01-17)

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times
In groundbreaking materials research, a team led by University of Minnesota Professor K. Andre Mkhoyan has made a discovery that blends the best of two sought-after qualities for touchscreens and smart windows--transparency and conductivity. (2021-01-15)

Researchers resolve controversy over energy gap of Van der Waals material
Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements revealed that the energy gap of chromium tribromide is around 0.3 electron volt (eV), which is much smaller than optical measurements, which ranged from 1.68 to 2.1 eV. (2021-01-15)

New method makes better predictions of material properties using low quality data
By combining large amounts of low-fidelity data with smaller quantities of high-fidelity data, nanoengineers from the Materials Virtual Lab at UC San Diego have developed a new machine learning method to predict the properties of materials with more accuracy than existing models. Crucially, their approach is also the first to predict the properties of disordered materials--those with atomic sites that can be occupied by more than one element, or can be vacant. (2021-01-14)

How aerosols are formed
ETH Zurich researchers conducted an experiment to investigate the initial steps in the formation of aerosols. Their findings are now aiding efforts to better understand and model that process - for example, the formation of clouds in the atmosphere. (2021-01-14)

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