Current Atpase News and Events

Current Atpase News and Events, Atpase News Articles.
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Newly discovered receptor helps to sneak a peek at evolution
Certain proteins call for unusual ways to get incorporated into membranes, because the signal sequence required for this process is located at their rear end instead of at the front. The relevant mechanism and its components are well-known and well-studied in yeast and mammals. Scientists have already hypothesised that it also occurs in plants, but there was no evidence of an indispensable receptor, until now. (2020-12-22)

First detailed look at how molecular Ferris wheel delivers protons to cellular factories
All cells with nuclei, from yeast to humans, use molecular machines called proton pumps to regulate the acidity of organelles - compartments where various types of work are done. A new study reveals a key step in how these Ferris wheel-like pumps operate. (2020-10-07)

Study reveals how renegade protein interrupts brain cell function in Alzheimer's disease
Dozens of molecules may tangle up with rogue bundles of tau, a protein that normally gives nerve fibers structure, to cause brain cell damage that contributes to neurodegenerative diseases, a new study shows. (2020-07-28)

Caveolin binding motif in Na/K-ATPase required for stem cell differentiation in animals
New findings reveal the importance of the Na/K-ATPase protein in stem cell differentiation and organogenesis, in a study led by scientists at Marshall University that involves the scaffolding function of the Na/K-ATPase. (2020-05-27)

New study unveils the mechanism of DNA high-order structure formation
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled the structure and mechanism of proteins that are highly overexpressed in various cancers and associated with poor patient prognoses. (2020-03-09)

New details on how a viral protein puts the brakes on virus replication
Researchers used computational chemistry, biochemistry and virology to uncover new information on how viruses such as West Nile, dengue and Zika replicate. (2020-02-07)

Mechanisms help pancreatic cancer cells avert starvation
A new study reveals the mechanism that helps pancreatic cancer cells avoid starvation within dense tumors by hijacking a process that pulls nutrients in from their surroundings. (2019-12-11)

Artificial cells act more like the real thing
Protocells -- artificial cells -- that are active and mimic living cells by moving independently and that are biocompatible and enzymatically active are now possible using an improved method developed by Penn State researchers. (2019-12-05)

Directional control of self-propelled protocells
Synthetic protocells can be made to move toward and away from chemical signals, an important step for the development of new drug-delivery systems that could target specific locations in the body. (2019-11-18)

Mutation of the co-chaperone Tsc1 in bladder cancer diminishes Hsp90 acetylation and reduces drug sensitivity and selectivity
The researchers have recently identified the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 as a new co-chaperone of Hsp90 that affects Hsp90 binding to its inhibitors. Their findings suggest that TSC1 status may predict response to Hsp90 inhibitors in patients with bladder cancer, and co-targeting HDACs can sensitize tumors with Tsc1 mutations to Hsp90 inhibitors. (2019-10-10)

DNA repair: Opening the hatch to heal the break
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have determined the structure of a key enzyme complex that is involved in DNA repair, and traced the cycle of conformational changes that it undergoes while performing its biochemical function. (2019-09-04)

Fat pumps generate electrical power
A previously unknown electrical current develops in the body's cells when the vital fat pump function of the flippases transfers ('flips') lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the body's cell membranes. This electrical current may be important for a range of other cell mechanisms, and in this way also for human well-being and health. This is shown by a study from Aarhus University, Denmark. (2019-08-27)

Structure of protein nano turbine revealed
IST Austria scientists determine the first structure of a cell's rotary engine using state-of-art microscopy. (2019-08-22)

Molecular biophysics -- the ABC of ribosome recycling
Ribosomes, the essential machinery used for protein synthesis is recycled after each one round of translation. An enzyme called ABCE1 is responsible for this process and turns out to be remarkably plastic as Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biophysicists report. (2019-07-25)

Research reveals role of fat storage cells in anti-obesity intervention
New research from a team at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine establishes a role of adipocyte Na/K-ATPase signaling in worsening obesity and its companion diseases, including neurodegeneration and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), that was enhanced by specific targeting of NaKtide, an antagonist of Na/K-ATPase signaling, to the adipocyte. (2019-05-31)

CNIO team describes the 'energy engine' of a protein that mediates key processes in cancer cells
The assembly of protein complexes involved in cancer mechanisms, like mTOR, ATR or telomerase, involves proteins -- chaperones and co-chaperones -- that resemble construction machinery Researchers at CNIO used cryo-electron microscopy to solve how the 'energy engine' of one of these co-chaperones, a potential target to reduce tumor growth, is regulated (2019-05-01)

Discovery of a host mRNA that inhibits immune functions of antiviral protein RIG-I
This study shows that, upon HCV infection, mRNA of selenoprotein P (SeP), a secretory protein produced primarily in the liver, binds to and inhibits the action of RIG-I, an antiviral protein, thus regulating innate immunity. RIG-I-mediated induction of interferon production is repressed by SeP mRNA, a host mRNA, affecting its antiviral activity. These results should lead to further elucidation of mechanisms underlying the association between metabolic disorders and virus-induced innate immunity dysfunction. (2019-04-10)

Source of citrus' sour taste is identified
A team of researchers, including two from the University of California, Riverside, has identified the genes responsible for the hallmark sour taste of many citrus fruits. (2019-03-04)

Scientists decode dynamics of the largest protein-degrading machine in atomic detail
Seven cryo-EM structures at atomic-level resolution revealed the inner working of human proteasome and its dynamic substrate-processing steps of ubiquitin recognition, deubiquitylation, translocation initiation and processive substrate degradation. (2019-02-24)

Anticancer mechanism revealed in yeast experiments
Scientists uncover how important enzymes in both fission yeast and human cancer cells interact to boost cell proliferation. (2019-02-05)

Bad brakes
A study in human and mouse heart cells identifies a faulty molecular brake in the most common form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people and athletes and the most common genetic disease of the heart The faulty brake, found about a quarter of all genetic mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, interferes with the heart muscle's ability to contract and relax,. Treatment with a chemical compound successfully restores normal contractility and relaxation in human heart cells (2019-01-28)

The role of calcium handling mechanisms in reperfusion injury
Cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) remain the major cause of death and disability worldwide.The overall goal of this review is to describe the different pathways that lead to I/R injury via Ca2+ overload, focus on recent discoveries and highlight prospects for therapeutic strategies for clinical benefit. (2018-12-19)

How sperm find their way
Researchers have found that a protein in the cell membranes of sperm plays a key role in how they find their way to eggs. The PMCA protein may also help explain how egg cells only interact with sperm from the same species. PMCA may even be a target of drug discovery. (2018-11-15)

Heredity matters: Ancestral protease functions as protein import motor in chloroplasts
Japanese researchers identified a large novel protein complex in the inner chloroplast membrane that functions as a motor to import proteins into the chloroplast. Components of the complex evolved from a protein of the endosymbiont cyanobacterium-like ancestor of chloroplasts that lost its protein-degrading function but retained its motor ability. These findings solve a longstanding mystery surrounding this protein translocation system that uniquely evolved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. (2018-10-22)

Journal issue honors 20th anniversary of Marshall University researcher's discovery
Twenty years ago, Zijian Xie, Ph.D., director of the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research and professor at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, discovered the scaffolding/signaling function of the Na/K-ATPase sodium pump. In honor of this milestone and the impact of Xie's discovery on cell biology, the International Journal of Molecular Sciences released a special issue featuring articles related to this scaffolding/signaling function. (2018-10-02)

Biophysics: Self-centered
Rod-shaped bacterial cells normally divide by constriction midway along their long axis. LMU physicists have developed a theoretical model to explain how Myxococcus xanthus localizes the plane of division to mid-cell. (2018-08-31)

New clues into how 'trash bag of the cell' traps and seals off waste
The mechanics behind how an important process within the cell traps material before recycling it has puzzled scientists for years. But Penn State researchers have gained new insight into how this process seals off waste, much like a trash bag. (2018-08-15)

Marshall School of Medicine research team defines possible anti-aging intervention
New research demonstrates that Na/K-ATPase oxidant amplification loop (NAKL) is intimately involved in the aging process and may serve as a target for anti-aging interventions. (2018-06-26)

Toxic toad invasion puts Madagascar's predators at risk, genetic evidence confirms
The recent introduction of the common Asian toad to Madagascar has led to fears that the toxic amphibian could wreak havoc on the island's already severely threatened fauna. Now, researchers report genetic evidence in the journal Current Biology on June 4 showing that those fears are well founded: virtually all predators native to Madagascar are highly sensitive to toad toxins. If they should eat the toads, it would be a potentially fatal mistake. (2018-06-04)

Direct visualization of dynamic structures of protein disaggregation molecular machines
ClpB, an ATP-fueled protein molecular machine, disentangles and reactivates aggregated proteins. By using high-speed atomic force microscopy, conformational dynamics of ClpB was visualized for the first time. ClpB forms open- and closed-ring, and the closed-ring was further classified into three forms; round, spiral, and twisted-half-spiral. These structures transformed each other during ATPase-cycle to perform protein disaggregation. This research will help to treat protein aggregations, which are related to various diseases and cause problems in industry. (2018-06-01)

AgriLife scientists uncover a new face of a famous protein, SWI2/SNF2 ATPase
A team of Texas A&M and Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists now have a deeper understanding of a large switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) protein complex that plays a pivotal role in plant and human gene expression that causes life-threatening diseases such as cancer. (2018-05-17)

Electrical signals in plants affect photosynthetic activity
Plants are constantly exposed to various stressors, including drought, fluctuations in temperature and light intensity, attacks by insects, etc. Since plants have an attached lifestyle, the only way to survive the impact of the stress factor is to quickly adapt their metabolism to the changing conditions. In the case when stressors (for example, strong light or mechanical damage) only act on certain parts of the plant organism, special stress signals propagate in the plant. (2018-05-03)

Global first determination of crystal structure of gastric proton pump
Nagoya University-centered researchers determined the first crystal structure the gastric proton pump H+, K+-ATPase responsible for acidifying gastric juice down to pH1. The team presented crystal structures of the H+, K+-ATPase in complex with two blockers, vonoprazan and SCH28080, at 2.8 Å resolution. This provides important information for refinement of existing drugs and discovery of new drugs. It also reveals the underlying mechanisms of how the highly acidic environment in the stomach is created. (2018-04-17)

Biophysics: Making patterns robust
Correct protein localization is crucial for many fundamental cellular processes. LMU physicists have now asked how to confer robustness against variations in protein concentrations on pattern formation mechanisms. (2018-04-17)

Discovery of compounds that keep plants fresh
A team of scientists at Nagoya University has discovered new compounds that can control stomatal movements in plants. Some of the compounds have shown to prevent leaves from drying up and suppress withering when sprayed onto rose and oat leaves. (2018-04-08)

Flipping lipids for cell transport-tubules
An enzyme that flips lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the cell membrane launches the process that permits cells to engulf external substances. (2018-03-29)

Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poison
Women have many options for oral contraceptives that are safe, effective and reversible, but despite decades of research, men have none. Now, scientists report a rat study in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry that shows they finally have a good lead for a male birth control pill. It's based on ouabain, a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poison on their arrows. (2018-01-17)

Mechanism identified behind enzyme involved in liver and other human cancers
To understand what has gone wrong when cancer occurs and to create new possibilities for treatment, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms behind what is happening at the cellular level. New research, which is now published in the journal Molecular Cell, explains how the motor of an enzyme in DNA damage repair is switched on and off and how these processes might go awry in cancer. (2017-12-07)

Researchers use a pump-induced disease to define underlying molecular mechanism
A Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center research study investigated a pump-induced disease and defined the molecular mechanism that triggers it. Researchers presented the study of the functional effects of specific mutations of the Na/K pump found in tumors that induce primary aldosteronism (Conn's syndrome). (2017-10-26)

Cleaning up? Not without helpers
Freiburg scientists explain assembly and transport function of 'old' calcium pumps by 'new' partner proteins. (2017-10-19)

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