Current Attempt News and Events

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New review compiles immunogenicity data on leading SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates
In a new Review, P.J. Klasse and colleagues present an extensive overview of the immunogenicity profiles of several leading SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates, including several developed under the auspices of (2021-02-19)

Handgun ownership associated with firearm suicide
Among firearm-owning individuals who died by suicide, handgun ownership was associated with greater odds of having died by self-inflicted gunshot wound rather than by another method, according to a Rutgers researcher. (2021-02-11)

Personalized screening to identify teens with high suicide risk
Researchers have developed a personalized system to better detect suicidal youths. (2021-02-03)

Traffic noise makes mating crickets less picky
New research has found that the mating behaviour of crickets is significantly affected by traffic noise and other man-made sounds. When man-made noise pollution was present, the females didn't take into account the courtship song of the male crickets during mating. As the courtship song is energetically costly and provides crucial information about the health of the male, this could affect long-term population viability as females could choose less suitable mates. (2021-02-01)

Youth with family history of suicide attempts have worse neurocognitive functioning
Children and adolescents with a family history of suicide attempts have lower executive functioning, shorter attention spans, and poorer language reasoning than those without a family history, according to a new study by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The study is the largest to date to examine the neurocognitive functioning of youth who have a biological relative who made a suicide attempt. (2021-01-11)

New light on polar explorer's last hours
Chemical analyzes of a black spot in a diary shed new light on the destiny and tragic death of legendary Inuit polar expedition member Jørgen Brønlund in Northeast Greenland in 1907. (2020-11-24)

COVID's collateral damage: Germicidal lamps may damage corneas
In a paper published in the journal of Ocular Immunology and Inflammation, physicians from the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine reported that several patients using germicidal lamps in an attempt to sanitize against the coronavirus, developed painful inflammation of the cornea, a condition called photokeratitis. These consumer-available ultraviolet (UV) emitting devices were being usedin an attempt toeliminate coronavirusfrom homes and offices. (2020-11-24)

Reducing aerosol pollution without cutting carbon dioxide could make the planet hotter
Humans must reduce carbon dioxide and aerosol pollution simultaneously to avoid weakening the ocean's ability to keep the planet cool, new UC Riverside research shows. (2020-11-17)

Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate 'live fast and die young', new research shows. (2020-11-17)

Combined intimate partner violence that includes sexual violence is common & more damaging
Women who experience sexual violence combined with other forms of intimate partner violence suffer greater damage to their health and are much more likely to attempt suicide, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care published in the International Journal of Epidemiology today [12 November 2020]. (2020-11-12)

A call for more comprehensive smoking cessation programs for cancer patients who smoke
In an editorial published in JAMA, UNC Lineberger's Adam Goldstein, MD, MPH, director of the UNC Tobacco Treatment Programs and professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Family Medicine, and his co-authors called for more funding and better reimbursement for smoking cessation counseling for cancer patients who smoke. (2020-10-13)

SwRI scientists study the rugged surface of near-Earth asteroid Bennu
As the days count down to NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft's Touch-And-Go asteroid sample collection attempt, Southwest Research Institute scientists have helped determine what the spacecraft can expect to return from the near-Earth asteroid Bennu's surface. Three papers published online by Science on Oct. 8 discuss the color, reflectivity, age, composition, origin and distribution of materials that make up the asteroid's rough surface. (2020-10-08)

Studies: E-cigarettes won't help smokers quit, but they may become addicted to vaping
Two UC San Diego School of Medicine-led analyses report that e-cigarettes are not effective in helping adults to quit smoking. (2020-09-02)

Sex, flies and videotape
Researchers discover key behaviour that triggers the transition from courtship to mating in fruit flies. (2020-08-13)

Clot permeability linked to first-attempt success of aspiration thrombectomy
A multicenter study reports that clot perviousness, or permeability - the ability for contrast used during the initial imaging workup to seep through a clot, as estimated by CT imaging - is associated with ''first-pass success'' in large vessel occlusion (LVO) strokes initially treated with an aspiration thrombectomy approach. LVO stroke treatment success using a stent retriever-first approach to remove the brain vessel blockage was less dependent on clot perviousness. (2020-08-11)

New research shows that laser spectral linewidth is classical-physics phenomenon
New ground-breaking research from the University of Surrey could change the way scientists understand and describe lasers - establishing a new relationship between classical and quantum physics. (2020-07-10)

Teens who say their parents are overcontrolling struggle with relationships, educational goals as adults
A new longitudinal study sought to determine the long-term impact on youth of parenting that is psychologically controlling. Although the study did not establish causation, it found that overbearing and overcontrolling tactics by parents when children were 13 years old were associated with difficulties in social relationships and educational attainment by the time the teens reached age 32. (2020-06-16)

Hallucinations in people with seizures may point to suicide risk
A study from scientists at Trinity College Dublin and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland shows that 8% of individuals with a history of seizures report hallucinations, including experiences of hearing or seeing things that are not based in reality. And, most importantly of that 8%, 65% also met criteria for one or more mental health disorders and 53% had one or more suicide attempt. (2020-06-11)

Study examines emotional regulation, family history as risk factors for suicidal behavior
In a recent study, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined the intersection of two risk factors, parental history of suicidal behavior and emotion regulation, in children 6-9 years of age. (2020-06-11)

Persistence of forages is dependent on harvest intervals
Research investigates effects of harvest intervals on alfalfa in southeastern United States. (2020-05-14)

Risk aversion as a survival strategy in ants
Ants are excellent navigators and always find their way back to the nest. But how do they react when an obstacle or a predator blocks their path? An international team including Antoine Wystrach, a CNRS researcher has shown that ants are capable of changing their familiar route to avoid traps thanks to an aversive learning mechanism: by associating visual cues with negative experiences, they can memorize potentially dangerous routes. (2020-04-09)

An updated overview of the complex clinical spectrum of tourette syndrome
Background: Tourette syndrome is a common nerve development disorder which is characterized by a variety of muscle or vocal movements called 'tics', often involuntary. The disorder is reflectively and quite erroneously associated by many as a just syndrome with tics and the frequent use of undesirable language (swearing). However, Tourette syndrome is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with several serious comorbidities justifying the quite recent term of 'Tourette disorder' in place of the known Tourette syndrome'. (2020-04-06)

APS tip sheet: Ultimate strength of metals
A new model is able to accurately determine the peak strength of polycrystalline metals. (2020-03-25)

Research calls for graphic warning labels to be added to cigarette packages
Experts at the Center for Tobacco Research and The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center are making a case for why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) proposed rule to add 13 new graphic warnings for cigarette packages and advertisements should be allowed to go into effect. (2020-02-13)

Infants integrate firsthand and social experiences to decide when and how to try
Persistence is important to learning and is related to success in school and emotional well-being. A new study of persistence from Arizona State University, the University of Washington and University of Toronto shows that 18-month-old infants made rational inferences about applying effort to problem solving. The infants dynamically integrated information from their own and others' experiences in deciding when and how to try. (2020-01-20)

Lame sheep adjust their behavior to cope with their condition, says a new study
Using novel sensing technology, experts from the University of Nottingham have found that lame sheep adjust how they carry out certain actives, such as walking, standing or laying down, rather than simply reducing the amount they do. (2020-01-15)

Compliance with ID rules in recreational cannabis stores
A new study finds that recreational cannabis stores in Colorado and Washington state, both of which legalized adult recreational use in 2012, show high levels of compliance with rules preventing underage purchase of cannabis. The study also shows that there is more than can be done to reach full compliance. (2019-12-22)

Strategies to lower risk for violent crime and gun violence
Researchers at the annual meeting of The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) present a series of studies during its Study of Violent Crime and Gun Violence symposium which contributes several new frameworks that can be used toward improving laws, civilian strategies, legislation and police response, as well as the overall study of risk in society. The Symposium will occur on Monday, Dec. 9 at 10:30 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Va. (2019-12-09)

Study identifies brain networks that play crucial role in suicide risk
An international team of researchers has identified key networks within the brain which they say interact to increase the risk that an individual will think about -- or attempt -- suicide. Writing today in Molecular Psychiatry, the researchers say that their review of existing literature highlights how little research has been done into one of the world's major killers, particularly among the most vulnerable groups. (2019-12-01)

New research suggests robots appear more persuasive when pretending to be human
Recent technological breakthroughs in artificial intelligence have made it possible for machines, or bots, to pass as humans. A team of researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi, studied study how people interact with bots they believe to be human, and how such interactions are affected once bots reveal their identity. The researchers found that bots are more efficient than humans at certain human-machine interactions, but only if they are allowed to hide their non-human nature. (2019-11-12)

Failure prognosis: Data science predicts which failures will ultimately succeed
Data science finds there is a critical threshold of lessons from failure that must be applied in order to achieve eventual success. (2019-10-30)

Low intelligence linked to suicide risk later in life
People with low scores on intelligence tests in adolescence run a higher risk of suicide and suicide attempt later in life. That is according to a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that followed almost 50,000 Swedish men from the 1970s until recently. The study is published in the journal Psychological Medicine. (2019-10-08)

Long-term mental health benefits of gender-affirming surgery for transgender individuals
For transgender individuals, gender-affirming surgery can lead to long-term mental health benefits, according to new research published online today in The American Journal of Psychiatry. (2019-10-04)

Ketoacidosis and high-blood sugar comas in patients with type 1 diabetes linked to increased risk of suicide attempt
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20) shows that in patients with type 1 diabetes, hospitalization for either ketoacidosis or a hyperglycaemic (high blood sugar) coma are both linked to a subsequent increase in the risk of attempting suicide. The study is by Dr. Jean Michel Petit, CHU (University Hospital) Dijon, France, and colleagues. (2019-09-19)

Suicide risk factors vary by ethnic group
A University of Houston professor of psychology is reporting that suicide risk factors vary by ethnic group. The newly published research provides a window into new suicide risk profiles needed for a rapidly changing America. (2019-09-17)

Is childhood-onset of IBD associated with risk of psychiatric disorders, suicide attempt?
Data from Swedish national registers were used to examine the risk of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempt in individuals diagnosed as children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared with people in the general population and with siblings of patients with IBD. (2019-08-19)

Ultrasound guidance improves first-attempt IV success in IV access in children
When caregivers used ultrasound to guide placement of intravenous lines in children with presumed difficult access, they had higher success rates on their first attempt. Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia report that this technique reduces the number of needle sticks in their young patients. (2019-08-05)

Rescuers often driven by emotion
Scientists from James Cook University and Royal Life Saving Society -- Australia have found reason can go out the window when people's family members, children and pets are in trouble in the water, and people should be better trained in water rescue skills. (2019-06-11)

Individuals who attempt suicide carry an increased genetic liability for depression, regardless of their psychiatric disorder
Study provides new information on the genetic basis of suicide attempt. (2019-06-05)

ASCO: Entrectinib gets edge over crizotinib against ROS1+ lung cancer
Median time to treatment discontinuation (TTD) on crizotinib was 8.8 months; TTD of patients using entrectinib was 14.6 months. Compared with patients on entrectinib, patients on crizotinib had an additional 44 percent chance that their cancer would resume its growth. (2019-05-30)

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