Current Attention News and Events

Current Attention News and Events, Attention News Articles.
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Politics and the brain: Attention perks up when politicians break with party lines
Building upon previous work studying the brain and politics, Ingrid Haas, associate professor of political science affiliated with Nebraska's Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, examined the insula and anterior cingular cortex in 58 individuals using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and learned that the human brain processes politically incongruent statements differently. (2021-02-22)

A language learning system that pays attention -- more efficiently than ever before
SpAtten, a hardware and software system developed at MIT, called SpAtten, that streamlines state-of-the-art natural language processing. The advance could reduce the computing power, energy, and time required for text analysis and generation. (2021-02-10)

Correspondence between representations in visual cortices and neural networks
A research group led by Nobuhiko Wagatsuma, Lecturer at Toho University, Akinori Hidaka, Associate Professor at Tokyo Denki University, and Hiroshi Tamura, Associate Professor at Osaka University, found that the neural network structure of attention prediction, based on deep learning used in the development of artificial intelligence, has similar characteristics to the cerebral mechanism of primates. (2021-02-08)

CCNY researchers demonstrate how to measure student attention during remote learning
The Covid-19 pandemic has made home offices, virtual meetings and remote learning the norm, and it is likely here to stay. But are people paying attention in online meetings? Are students paying attention in virtual classrooms? Researchers Jens Madsen and Lucas C. Parra from City College of New York, demonstrate how eye tracking can be used to measure the level of attention online using standard web cameras, without the need to transfer any data from peoples computers, thus preserving privacy. (2021-01-29)

In a tight spot
A newly discovered circuit helps fish to prioritize. (2021-01-27)

Is there a link between cashless payments and unhealthy consumption?
The widespread use of cashless payments including credit cards, debit cards, and mobile apps has made transactions more convenient for consumers. However, results from previous research have shown that such cashless payments can increase consumers' spending on unhealthy food. (2021-01-27)

Toddlers who use touchscreens may be more distractible
New research published in Scientific Report highlights some of the effects regular use of touchscreens might have on toddlers. (2021-01-26)

The stark health and well-being impacts of 'cocooning' on older people
Findings of a new study published by researchers from Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital outline the health impacts faced by older people while cocooning during the Covid-19 pandemic. The findings are published in the Quarterly Journal of Medicine here: https://bit.ly/3qGKJoI. (2021-01-25)

Growing up in a bilingual home has lasting benefits
New research has found that growing up in a bilingual home can provide unexpected cognitive benefits later in life. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, demonstrates for the first time that adults who acquired their second language as a young child (early bilinguals) are quicker at shifting attention and quicker at detecting visual changes compared to adults who learnt their second language later in life (late bilinguals). (2021-01-22)

Autism theory 25 years in the making
A unifying explanation of the cause of autism and the reason for its rising prevalence has eluded scientists for decades, but a theoretical model published in the journal Medical Hypotheses describes the cause as a combination of socially valued traits, common in autism, and any number of co-occurring disabilities. (2021-01-08)

Do toddlers learning to spoon-feed seek different information from caregivers' hands & faces?
When toddlers begin to use a spoon to eat by themselves, what kind of interactions facilitate this behavior? To find out, an international research collaboration led by Kobe University's Professor NONAKA Tetsushi and the University of Minnesota's Professor Thomas A. Stoffregen investigated the interactions between toddlers and their caregivers during mealtimes at a daycare center in Japan. (2020-12-27)

COVID-19 escalated armed conflicts in several war-torn countries
Nine countries were studied - four were found to have reduced conflict but five saw escalations (2020-12-17)

Eyebuy: Sweeping glances can cost you money
When Christmas shopping, customers should keep their eyes unter control. As a study by researchers from Austria, Germany and UK shows, visual attention can be strongly influenced during shopping with very simple interventions. The researchers report in the Journal of Consumer Research that unplanned purchases can even double as a result. (2020-12-08)

Labeling paid 'influencer' vaping posts as ads draws attention
Social media influencers vaping glamorously into their social media feeds are often not doing so for free. And new research suggests that calling out their pay-to-play posts as advertisements in a plain, obvious way might have an impact on young people. (2020-12-08)

Study finds gamblers ignore important information when placing bet
People with gambling problems are less likely to consider important information that could prevent them from losing, according to new research published today from the UBC's Centre for Gambling Research. (2020-12-03)

Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture. As an adult, that's not hard to do. But a new study shows that, even when told to pay attention to the mountain, preschool children focus so much on the cat that they won't later recognize the same mountain. (2020-11-30)

COVID's collateral damage: Germicidal lamps may damage corneas
In a paper published in the journal of Ocular Immunology and Inflammation, physicians from the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine reported that several patients using germicidal lamps in an attempt to sanitize against the coronavirus, developed painful inflammation of the cornea, a condition called photokeratitis. These consumer-available ultraviolet (UV) emitting devices were being usedin an attempt toeliminate coronavirusfrom homes and offices. (2020-11-24)

Stanford researchers link poor memory to attention lapses and media multitasking
Stanford researchers are connecting the dots between attention and memory to explain why we remember certain things and forget others, why some people remember better than others and how media multitasking affects how well we recall. (2020-10-28)

Citizens themselves contribute to political mistrust
People have a special ability to detect and disseminate information about egotistic and selfish leaders. In this way, citizens themselves contribute greatly to the proliferation of voter apathy and mistrust of politicians, according to a new study from Aarhus BSS at Aarhus University. (2020-10-20)

Properties of catalysts studied with gamma ray resonance
Steam-assisted oil extraction methods for heavy deposits have long been the focus of attention at Kazan Federal University. In particular, much attention is paid to in-situ combustion catalysts. (2020-10-13)

Sleep health dictates success of practicing mindfulness
Sleeping an extra 29 minutes each night can be the key to improving mindfulness, a critical resource that has benefits for daily well-being and work performance. (2020-10-13)

Musical training can improve attention and working memory in children - study
Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding. (2020-10-08)

How mobile apps grab our attention
Aalto University researchers alongside international collaborators have done the first empirical study on how users pay visual attention to mobile app designs. (2020-10-06)

Toddlers who use touchscreens show attention differences
New research from the TABLET project recruited 12-month-old infants who had different levels of touchscreen usage. (2020-08-19)

How do we prioritize what we see?
It is known that different regions of the brain help us prioritize information so we can efficiently process visual scenes. A new study by a team of neuroscientists has discovered that one specific region, the occipital cortex, plays a causal role in piloting our attention to manage the intake of images. (2020-08-13)

TV-watching snackers beware: you won't notice you're full if your attention is elsewhere
Eating while doing something perceptually-demanding makes it more difficult to notice when you feel full, shows new research from the University of Sussex. (2020-08-12)

Understanding why some children enjoy TV more than others
New research shows that children's own temperament could be driving the amount of TV they watch. The research shows how the brain responses of 10-month-old babies watching a clip from Disney's Fantasia on repeat could predict whether they would enjoy watching fast-paced TV shows six months later. The findings are important for the ongoing debate around early TV exposure. (2020-08-05)

Waning attention to climate change amid pandemic could have lasting effects
With COVID-19 dominating the headlines, searches for climate change are on the decline. That worries authors of a new study showing that even brief, involuntary attention to environmental issues moves people to care more and act. (2020-08-05)

Energy demands limit our brains' information processing capacity
Our brains have an upper limit on how much they can process at once due to a constant but limited energy supply, according to a new UCL study using a brain imaging method that measures cellular metabolism. (2020-08-03)

An averted glance gives a glimpse of the mind behind the eyes
Shakespeare once wrote that the ''eyes are the window to your soul.'' But scientists have found it challenging to peer into the brain to see how it derives meaning from a look into another's eyes. Psychologists at Yale and Harvard have now found a new way to study this mystery by examining the universal and embarrassing tendency to avert one's gaze when caught looking at someone else. (2020-08-03)

Increased attention to sad faces predicts depression risk in teenagers
Teenagers who tend to pay more attention to sad faces are more likely to develop depression, but specifically within the context of stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-07-28)

Mapping the brain's sensory gatekeeper
Researchers from MIT and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have mapped the thalamic reticular nucleus in unprecedented detail, revealing that the region contains two distinct subnetworks of neurons with different functions. The findings could offer researchers much more specific targets for designing drugs that could alleviate attention deficits, sleep disruption, and sensory hypersensitivity. (2020-07-22)

Our animal inheritance: Humans perk up their ears, too, when they hear interesting sounds
Many animals move their ears to better focus their attention on a novel sound. That humans also have this capability was not known until now. A research team now has demonstrated that we make minute, unconscious movements of our ears that are directed towards the sound want to focus our attention on. The team discovered this ability by measuring electrical signals in the muscles of the vestigial motor system in the human ear. The results have now been published in the journal 'eLife'. (2020-07-07)

Level of media coverage for scientific research linked to number of citations
An analysis of over 800 academic research papers on physical health and exercise suggests that the level of popular media coverage for a given paper is strongly linked to the attention it receives within the scientific community. P. Sage Anderson and colleagues at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, report these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 1, 2020. (2020-07-01)

Does 'mommy brain' last? Study shows motherhood does not diminish attention
'Mommy brain' is a long-held perception that mothers are more forgetful and less attentive. A new study shows that mothers are equally as attentive, or more attentive than, non-mothers. (2020-06-23)

The relationship between looking/listening and human emotions
Toyohashi University of Technology has indicated that the relationship between attentional states in response to pictures and sounds and the emotions elicited by them may be different in visual perception and auditory perception. This result suggests visual perception elicits emotions in all attentional states, whereas auditory perception elicits emotions only when attention is paid to sounds, thus showing the differences in the relationships between attentional states and emotions in response to visual and auditory stimuli. (2020-06-19)

Mindfulness improves decision-making, attention in children with autism
School-based mindfulness programs can improve decision-making skills and teach children with autism to focus attention and react less impulsively through breathing exercises that will allow them to reduce anxiety, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-06-02)

Johns Hopkins: What we can't see can help us find things
Anyone who's ever tried to find something in a hurry knows how helpful it is to think about the lost item's color, size and shape. But surprisingly, traits of an object that you can't see also come into play during a search, Johns Hopkins University researchers found. (2020-05-12)

New research reveals heavy cost of excessive drinking on people's decision making
A new study highlights how hangover inhibits individuals' 'core executive functions' with knock-on impacts for those currently working from home. (2020-04-21)

Novel computational methods provide new insight into daytime alertness in people with sleep apnoea
New polysomnography parameters are better than conventional ones at describing how the severity of oxygen desaturation during sleep affects daytime alertness in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea, according to a new study published in European Respiratory Journal. (2020-04-21)

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