Current Attitudes News and Events

Current Attitudes News and Events, Attitudes News Articles.
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Novice drivers talking on hand-held smartphones are more likely to run red-lights
Young novice drivers who speak into hand-held smartphones while driving are also likely to drive while under the influence of drink or drugs, according to researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software. (2021-02-23)

The appearance of robots affects our perception of the morality of their decisions
Artificial intelligence and robotics are advancing at a rapid pace, with the number of autonomous intelligent machines making moral choices among us continuously on the rise. Knowledge in moral psychology pertaining to artificial intelligence and robotics is important when discussing the ethics of their development. (2021-02-22)

Psychological 'signature' for the extremist mind uncovered by Cambridge researchers
Study investigates ideological attitudes using an unprecedented number of cognitive and personality tests, and finds that people who lean towards ''extreme pro-group action'' have a similar type of mind. (2021-02-21)

How likely are consumers to adopt artificial intelligence for banking advice?
A new study published in Economic Inquiry is the first to assess the willingness of consumers to adopt advisory services in the banking sector that are based on artificial intelligence (AI). (2021-02-18)

Mental health disorders and alcohol misuse more common in LGB people
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB*) people are significantly more likely to have mental health conditions and report alcohol and drug misuse than heterosexual people - according to a new study led by UCL researchers in collaboration with the University of East Anglia and City, University of London. (2021-02-16)

Tom Hanks' COVID-19 diagnosis likely shaped behaviors, thoughts toward virus
When actor Tom Hanks announced his COVID-19 diagnosis on March 11, 2020, many Americans were still learning about the virus and its severity. According to new research, Hanks' announcement may have affected how some people understood the virus and their behavior toward its prevention. (2021-02-05)

Football and inclusion: It all comes down to the right motivational climate
Playing football has the potential to promote the inclusion of young people who are not from the predominant culture of a country, i.e. young migrants. Crucially, the feeling of belonging and being accepted depends on the trainer's approach to training - or more precisely, the motivational climate they create. Task-oriented training is significantly more suitable than training that is geared towards performance and competition. (2021-01-29)

Drink and drug risk is lower among optimistic pupils with 'happy' memories, says study
Teenagers with happy childhood memories are likely to drink less, take fewer drugs and enjoy learning, according to research published in the peer-reviewed journal Addiction Research & Theory. (2021-01-25)

UK public supports usage of tracking technology and immunity passports in global pandemic
New research suggests the majority of people in the UK are willing to use privacy-encroaching tracking technology and support the introduction of 'immunity passports' to protect themselves and others in the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-22)

Could "Power Walking" fuel the energy revolution? India is ready to step up
India has an energy problem. It currently relies heavily on coal and consumer demand is expected to double by 2040, making its green energy targets look out of reach. Part of the solution could come from harvesting energy from footsteps, say Hari Anand and Binod Kumar Singh from the University of Petroleum and Energy Studies in Dehradun, India. Their new study, published in the De Gruyter journal Energy Harvesting and Systems, shows that Indian attitudes towards power generated through piezoelectric tiles are overwhelmingly positive. (2021-01-19)

Worker safety goes beyond human error
Disasters in high-risk industries can have catastrophic environmental, financial and human safety consequences. One way these industries help prevent and mitigate disasters is formal procedures designed to standardize how work is done. These procedures typically come in the form of a written document workers use while performing a task. (2021-01-19)

BAME parliamentary candidates not picked to fight 'winnable seats' in areas with less tolerance towa
Political parties are increasingly likely to avoid selecting ethnic minority candidates for 'winnable' constituencies at General Elections in areas where there are less tolerant attitudes toward diversity, research suggests. (2021-01-11)

Sexual dysfunction hits some women harder than others as they age
Sexual dysfunction often accompanies the menopause transition. Yet, not all women experience it the same. A new study identified the determinants that affect a woman's risk of sexual dysfunction and sought to determine the effectiveness of hormone therapy in decreasing that risk and modifying sexual behavior. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-01-06)

How to talk about death and dying
Our reluctance to think, talk or communicate about death is even more pronounced when we deal with others' loss compared to our own, new research finds, but either way we tend to frame attitudes and emotions in a sad and negative way. Teaching new more positive ways to address these difficult conversations is the focus of a new paper in PLOS ONE journal by palliative care specialists across Australia. (2021-01-06)

Vaccine myths on social media can be effectively reduced with credible fact checking
Researchers found that fact-check tags located immediately below or near a social media post can generate more positive attitudes toward vaccines than misinformation alone, and perceived source expertise makes a difference. (2021-01-06)

Traditional stereotypes about masculinity may help explain support for Trump
American politicians have long been expected to uphold a certain veneer: powerful, influential and never vulnerable. New Penn State research has found that these idealized forms of masculinity may also help explain support for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election and in the days leading up to the 2020 election. (2021-01-04)

Study examines attitudes toward non-native birds
A new study from scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines public attitudes toward non-native bird species and whether people are willing to manage them to protect native cavity-nesting birds, such as Eastern Bluebirds and the American Kestrel. The findings are published in the Journal of Environmental Management. (2020-12-21)

Concern about loved ones might motivate people to mask up and get vaccine
In a recent survey, people who said social distancing and COVID-safety guidelines violated their personal freedoms responded more positively to these ideas when they felt a loved one might be at risk of severe illness for COVID-19. (2020-12-18)

Attitudes about climate change are shifting, even in Texas
Longstanding skepticism among Texans toward the climate movement has shifted, and attitudes in the nation's leading energy-producing state now mirror those in the rest of the United States, according to new research by UH Energy and the University of Houston Hobby School of Public Affairs. (2020-12-15)

Proportionally more male bosses negative toward depression
A higher proportion of male than of female managers have negative attitudes toward depression, a University of Gothenburg study shows. The more senior the managerial positions, the bigger the share of men with negative attitudes; the same, moreover, applies to women in senior managerial jobs. (2020-12-14)

Wielding a gun makes a shooter perceive others as wielding a gun, too
Nearly a decade ago, cognitive psychologist Jessica Witt wondered if the mere act of wielding a firearm could bias someone to perceive another person as wielding one, too - and more importantly, if such a bias could be scientifically measured. A series of experiments later, Witt and her research team concluded, yes and yes. The team has recently published a new set of experiments further underscoring what they call the ''gun embodiment effect'' in the journal Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications. (2020-12-09)

Patients with kidney disease may delay AVF creation
Many patients start hemodialysis with temporary vascular access despite regular kidney care and pre-dialysis education. Delay is often related to patient choice but research on patients' perspectives is limited. In this study, researchers surveyed pre-dialysis patients and their family members about their perceptions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their intentions to undergo access creation. They also report on a new survey instrument to measure attitudes towards hemodialysis preparation. (2020-12-03)

Two out of three people would have a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available
Scientists at Keele University and King's College London have found that 64% of people would be likely to have a COVID-19 vaccination when one became available. (2020-11-26)

Limited access to buprenorphine restricts resident physicians treating opioid abusers
A University of South Florida Health-led survey of resident physicians in Florida indicates they are interested in treating opioid addiction but face barriers to offering patients treatment using buprenorphine, an FDA-approved medication shown to successfully decrease opioid use, overdose events, and deaths associated with opioids. Many states have reported increased deaths from opioids since the COVID-19 epidemic began, underscoring the need to remove barriers to care. (2020-11-20)

Xenophobia in Germany is declining, but old resentments are paired with new radicalism
Xenophobia in Germany has decreased, but right-wing extremist attitudes remain high. There is also evidence of ''radicalisation and disinhibition among those with far-right views''. These are key findings of the representative Leipzig Authoritarianism Study. Professors Oliver Decker and Elmar Brähler from the Competence Centre for Right-Wing Extremism and Democracy Research at Leipzig University presented the study results today (18 November) at the Federal Press Conference (BPK) in Berlin. (2020-11-18)

Racial attitudes in a community affect COVID-19 numbers
Implicit racial attitudes within a community can effectively explain racial disparities seen in rates of COVID-19 in the United States, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by George Cunningham and Lisa Wigfall of Texas A&M University, USA. (2020-11-18)

Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners. (2020-11-17)

Could robots for sex, friendship improve our aging society?
The current U.S. marketplace for sex robots is geared to fulfilling the needs of young, white, able-bodied, heterosexual males - a population perhaps least in need of such assistance - and simultaneously overlooks a vast demographic of potential customers: senior citizens. A bioethicist identifies the opportunity among socially isolated and disabled people age 65 and over in aging societies: Many would value a robot's companionship and, yes, even its ability to provide sexual gratification. (2020-11-16)

Research finds that UK consumers dislike hormones in beef and chlorine washed chicken
New reveals the extent to which UK consumers dislike food produced using production methods such as hormones in beef and chlorine washed chicken. The research also reveals that UK consumers highly value food production that adheres to food safety standards set by the EU as well as UK produced food. This is particularly relevant for post-Brexit trade deals and the ongoing debates about UK food standards. (2020-11-12)

Sociologists dispel the 'bad apple' excuse for racialized policing
According to a study by University of Miami sociologists published in the American Sociological Association's Contexts magazine, almost one of five police officers exhibit high levels of implicit, or unconscious, pro-white/anti-Black bias, and roughly one of eight officers exhibit high levels of explicit, or conscious, pro-white bias. (2020-11-11)

Stereotypes and discrimination contribute to HIV-related stigma among nursing staff
To describe the attitudes of the university nursing faculty toward caring for PLHIV; and to identify the relationship between faculty attitudes and explanatory factors such as age, education, religion, nationality, teaching in a clinical setting, years of experience, and university attributes. (2020-10-30)

From sea to shining sea: new survey reveals state-level opinions on climate change
A new report analyzing state-level opinions on climate change finds the majority of Americans believe in and want action on climate change--but factors like state politics and local climate play important roles. (2020-10-26)

Projecting favorable perceptions of space
For anthropologists and other social scientists, the space race in the 1950s served as a period of cultural and technological transformation as well as an opportunity to advance the public good. (2020-10-19)

COVID: women are less likely to put themselves in danger
Women's attitudes and behaviors may have contributed to their reduced vulnerability and mortality. A survey conducted in 8 OECD countries shows that they consider the Coronavirus a more serious problem than men, are more likely to approve health policies and less likely to disregard them (2020-10-16)

Bringing people together on climate change
A new study suggests that engaging, high-quality media programming could help Democrats and Republicans see eye to eye when it comes to climate change. (2020-10-14)

Study: There's work to be done before people feel ready for COVID-19 vaccine
A new study in the journal Vaccines indicates some significant public messaging should be communicated before any COVID-19 vaccines are made available in the US. And with vaccines potentially being approved by the end of the year or early next year, the clock is ticking. (2020-10-13)

Which is more creative, the arts or the sciences?
International expert in creativity and innovation, UniSA's Professor David Cropley, is calling for Australian schools and universities to increase their emphasis on teaching creativity, as new research shows it is a core competency across all disciplines and critical for ensuring future job success. (2020-10-12)

Men less likely to see food as national security issue amid pandemic
On average, men not only showed less empathy toward temporary agricultural laborers but also were less likely to see food supply and production as national security issues, according to a study led by a Washington State University researcher. (2020-10-08)

Athletes using sport supplements are more open to doping -- study
Athletes using legal performance enhancing and medical sport supplements are more likely to dope than those using sport foods and superfoods, a new study reveals. (2020-10-08)

Survey finds American support for human-animal chimera research
In September 2015, the US National Institutes of Health placed a funding moratorium on research that involves introducing human pluripotent stem cells into animal embryos. To assess attitudes on human-animal chimeric embryo research, investigators conducted a survey among 430 Americans. The results of the survey, which found that 82% of people are supportive of at least some parts of this research, appear October 1 in the journal Stem Cell Reports. (2020-10-01)

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