Current Auditory News and Events

Current Auditory News and Events, Auditory News Articles.
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Changing the connection between the hemispheres affects speech perception
When we listen to speech sounds, our brain needs to combine information from both hemispheres. How does the brain integrate acoustic information from remote areas? In a neuroimaging study, a team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics, the Donders Institute and the University of Zurich applied electrical stimulation to participants' brains during a listening task. The stimulation affected the connection between the two hemispheres, which in turn changed participants' listening behaviour. (2021-02-12)

Auditory brainstem pathways do not develop properly without microglia
Auditory pathways in the brainstem do not fully mature without microglia clearing away extra cell connections. This crucial function occurs even when pruning by microglia is delayed, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2021-02-08)

Synchronization of brain hemispheres changes what we hear
Most of the time, our brain receives different input from each of our ears, but we nevertheless perceive speech as unified sounds. This process takes place through synchronization of the areas of the brain involved with the help of gamma waves, neurolinguists at the University of Zurich have now discovered. Their findings may lead to new treatment approaches for tinnitus. (2021-02-08)

Link found between time perception, risk for developmental coordination disorder
Neuroscientists at McMaster University have found a link between children who are at risk for developmental coordination disorder (DCD), a common condition that can cause clumsiness, and difficulties with time perception such as interpreting changes in rhythmic beats. (2021-02-05)

Children cannot ignore what they hear when detecting emotions
Children determine emotion by what they hear, rather than what they see, according to new research. The first-of-its-kind study, by Durham University's Department of Psychology, looked at how children pick up on the emotions of a situation. They found that whilst adults prioritised what they see, young children showed an auditory dominance and overwhelmingly prioritised what they could hear. The researchers say their findings could benefit parents currently managing home learning and professional educators. (2021-01-26)

Stimulating brain pathways shows origins of human language and memory
Scientists have identified that the evolutionary development of human and primate brains may have been similar for communication and memory. (2021-01-25)

Musicians have more connected brains than non-musicians
The brains of musicians have stronger structural and functional connections compared to those of non-musicians, regardless of innate pitch ability, according to new research from JNeurosci. (2021-01-25)

Of the honey bee dance
Honey bees are unique in that they not only alert their nestmates but have also evolved a symbolic communication in the form of a dance - a waggle dance. (2021-01-18)

Scientists shed light on how and why some people report "hearing the dead"
Spiritualist mediums might be more prone to immersive mental activities and unusual auditory experiences early in life, according to new research. (2021-01-17)

We hear what we expect to hear
Dresden neuroscientists show that the entire auditory pathway represents sounds according to prior expectations. Their findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal eLife. (2021-01-08)

Study explains role of bone-conducted speech transmission in speech production and hearing
The perception of our own voice depends on sound transmission through air (air-conducted) as well as through the skull bone (bone-conducted or BC). The transmission properties of BC speech are, however, not well understood. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology report their latest findings on BC transmission under the influence of oral cavity sound pressure, which can boost BC-based technology and basic research on hearing loss and speech impairment. (2021-01-07)

Social transmission of pain, fear has different targets in mouse brain
Social contact can transfer the feeling of pain or fear in several animal species, including humans, but the exact neural mechanisms for this transmission are still being studied. (2021-01-07)

New review says the ineffective 'learning styles' theory persists in education
A new review by Swansea University reveals there is widespread belief, around the world, in a teaching method that is not only ineffective but may actually be harmful to learners. For decades educators have been advised to match their teaching to the supposed 'learning styles' of students. However, a new paper by Professor Phil Newton, of Swansea University Medical School, highlights that this ineffective approach is still believed by teachers and calls for a more evidence-based approach to teacher-training. (2021-01-06)

Guinea baboons grunt with an accent
Vocal learning leads to modification of call structure in a multi-level baboon society (2021-01-06)

Music-induced emotions can be predicted from brain scans
Researchers at the University of Turku have discovered what type of neural mechanisms are the basis for emotional responses to music. Altogether 102 research subjects listened to music that evokes emotions while their brain function was scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The study was carried out in the national PET Centre. (2020-12-28)

Study sheds new light on how the brain distinguishes speech from noise
For the first time, researchers have provided physiological evidence that a pervasive neuromodulation system - a group of neurons that regulate the functioning of more specialized neurons - strongly influences sound processing in an important auditory region of the brain. The neuromodulator, acetylcholine, may even help the main auditory brain circuitry distinguish speech from noise. (2020-12-20)

COVID-19 does not damage auditory system, Tel Aviv University study finds
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been reports in the professional literature on possible hearing loss caused by the disease. A new study from Tel Aviv University (TAU), in collaboration with the Galilee Medical Center, finds no evidence of damage to the auditory system as a result of COVID-19 infection. (2020-12-15)

How does eye position affect 'cocktail party' listening?
Several acoustic studies have shown that the position of your eyes determines where your visual spatial attention is directed, which automatically influences your auditory spatial attention. Researchers are currently exploring its impact on speech intelligibility. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Virginia Best will describe her work to determine whether there is a measurable effect of eye position within cocktail party listening situations. (2020-12-09)

Dogs may never learn that every sound of a word matters
Despite their excellent auditory capacities, dogs do not attend to differences between words which differ only in one speech sound (e.g. dog vs dig), according to a new study by Hungarian researchers measuring brain activity with non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) on awake dogs. This might be a reason why the number of words dogs learn to recognize typically remains very low throughout their life. (2020-12-08)

Zebra finches amazing at unmasking the bird behind the song
Like humans who can instantly tell which friend or relative is calling by the timbre of the person's voice, zebra finches have a near-human capacity for language mapping. (2020-11-20)

Hearing test may detect autism in newborns
University of Miami and Harvard Medical School researchers who explored responses to the standard hearing test administered to millions of newborns around the world are closing in on a way to detect early indicators of autism--perhaps as early as at birth. (2020-11-12)

UTSA research team makes breakthrough discovery on brain cortex functionality
A team of researchers from UTSA's Neurosciences Institute is challenging the historical belief that the organization of the cortical circuit of GABAergic neurons is exclusively local. (2020-11-11)

The EAR-PC study findings encourages screening for hearing loss in older adults
Hearing loss is the second most common disability in the United States and comes with it a higher risk for being diagnosed with significant health conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes, dementia and depression, as well as higher health care cost and use. The Early Auditory Referral-Primary Care (EAR-PC) study was designed to address the lack of data about hearing loss screening. (2020-11-10)

Buzz kill: Ogre-faced spiders 'hear' airborne prey with their legs
In the dark of night, ogre-faced spiders with dominating big eyes dangle from a silk frame to cast a web and capture their ground prey. But these spiders also can capture insects flying behind them with precision, and Cornell University scientists have now confirmed how. (2020-10-29)

War songs and lullabies behind origins of music
Love is not the primary reason humans developed music. A new evolutionary theory of the origins of music argues more evidence supports music coming from the need for groups to impress allies and foes, and for parents to signal their attention to infants. They also argue against the theory that making music arose out of a need for social bonding, or that it is ''auditory cheesecake'' a fancy evolutionary byproduct with no purpose. (2020-10-26)

Newborn brains lack maturity to process emotions as adults do
Humans aren't born with mature brain circuitry that attaches emotions to the things they see or hear in their environment, a new study shows. Researchers studying brain scans of newborns found that the part of the brain involved in experiencing emotions isn't functionally connected in a mature way with the regions that process visual or auditory stimuli. (2020-10-19)

Musical training can improve attention and working memory in children - study
Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding. (2020-10-08)

Experience and instinct: Both count when recognizing infant cries
Caregivers learn to decipher differences in newborn cries through a combination of hard-wired instincts and on-the-job experience, a new study in rodents shows. (2020-10-07)

Sensory device stimulates ears and tongue to treat tinnitus in large trial
A device that stimulates the ears and tongue substantially reduced the severity of tinnitus symptoms in 326 patients for as long as 1 year, while achieving high patient satisfaction and adherence. (2020-10-07)

Mouse study suggests parental response to infant distress is innate but adapts to change
A National Institutes of Health study in mice suggests that parents have an innate capacity to respond to an infant's cries for help and this capacity may serve as a foundation from which a parent learns to adjust to an infant's changing needs. (2020-10-07)

RUDN University linguist: learning foreign language is harder for visually impaired people
A scientist from RUDN University analysed the effect of visual impairment on a person's perception of unfamiliar sounds when learning a foreign language. The experiment showed that lack of access to visual cues makes learning difficult. (2020-10-06)

Brain stimulation reduces dyslexia deficits
Restoring normal patterns of rhythmic neural activity through non-invasive electrical stimulation of the brain alleviates sound-processing deficits and improves reading accuracy in adults with dyslexia, according to a study published September 8, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Silvia Marchesotti and Anne-Lise Giraud of the University of Geneva, and colleagues. (2020-09-08)

Holistic bursting cells might be basis of brain cognition
Recently, scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with collaborators at home and abroad, presented the discovery of ''holistic bursting'' cells, a novel functional class of cortical neurons that represent learned complex objects as wholes rather than parts. (2020-09-03)

Hearing loss in naked mole-rats is an advantage, not a hardship
With six mutations in genes associated with hearing, naked mole-rats can barely hear the constant squeaking they use to communicate with one another. This hearing loss, which is strange for such social, vocal animals, is an adaptive, beneficial trait, according to new findings published in the journal Current Biology. (2020-09-03)

Keeping the beat - it's all in your brain
How do people coordinate their actions with the sounds they hear? This basic ability, which allows people to cross the street safely while hearing oncoming traffic, dance to new music or perform team events such as rowing, has puzzled cognitive neuroscientists for years. A new study led by researchers at McGill University is shining a light on how auditory perception and motor processes work together. (2020-09-01)

Wireless, optical cochlear implant uses LED lights to restore hearing in rodents
Scientists have created an optical cochlear implant based on LED lights that can safely and partially restore the sensation of hearing in deaf rats and gerbils. (2020-07-22)

Researchers identify subject-specific component to perceptual learning ability
Ph.D. candidate YANG Jia and her colleagues, under the guidance of Prof. HUANG Changbing from the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and LU Zhonglin from New York University (NYU) and NYU Shanghai recently collected and analyzed data from a large sample of subjects in seven visual, auditory and working memory training tasks. (2020-07-21)

Hair cell loss causes age-related hearing loss
Age-related hearing loss has more to do with the death of hair cells than the cellular battery powering them wearing out, according to new research in JNeurosci. That means wearing ear protection may prevent some age-related hearing loss. (2020-07-20)

Blood vessels communicate with sensory neurons to decide their fate
The researchers, using real-time videos, have discovered that both the neurons and the cells of blood vessels emit dynamic protrusions to be able to 'talk' to each other. (2020-07-16)

Study finds hidden emotions in the sound of words
In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, it's common to feel stress levels rise every time we hear the word ''virus.'' But new Cornell-led research reveals that the sound of the word itself was likely to raise your blood pressure - even before ''corona'' was added to it. (2020-07-14)

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