Nav: Home

Current Auditory News and Events

Current Auditory News and Events, Auditory News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Newborn brains lack maturity to process emotions as adults do
Humans aren't born with mature brain circuitry that attaches emotions to the things they see or hear in their environment, a new study shows. (2020-10-19)
Musical training can improve attention and working memory in children - study
Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding. (2020-10-08)
Experience and instinct: Both count when recognizing infant cries
Caregivers learn to decipher differences in newborn cries through a combination of hard-wired instincts and on-the-job experience, a new study in rodents shows. (2020-10-07)
Sensory device stimulates ears and tongue to treat tinnitus in large trial
A device that stimulates the ears and tongue substantially reduced the severity of tinnitus symptoms in 326 patients for as long as 1 year, while achieving high patient satisfaction and adherence. (2020-10-07)
Mouse study suggests parental response to infant distress is innate but adapts to change
A National Institutes of Health study in mice suggests that parents have an innate capacity to respond to an infant's cries for help and this capacity may serve as a foundation from which a parent learns to adjust to an infant's changing needs. (2020-10-07)
RUDN University linguist: learning foreign language is harder for visually impaired people
A scientist from RUDN University analysed the effect of visual impairment on a person's perception of unfamiliar sounds when learning a foreign language. (2020-10-06)
Brain stimulation reduces dyslexia deficits
Restoring normal patterns of rhythmic neural activity through non-invasive electrical stimulation of the brain alleviates sound-processing deficits and improves reading accuracy in adults with dyslexia, according to a study published September 8, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Silvia Marchesotti and Anne-Lise Giraud of the University of Geneva, and colleagues. (2020-09-08)
Holistic bursting cells might be basis of brain cognition
Recently, scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with collaborators at home and abroad, presented the discovery of ''holistic bursting'' cells, a novel functional class of cortical neurons that represent learned complex objects as wholes rather than parts. (2020-09-03)
Hearing loss in naked mole-rats is an advantage, not a hardship
With six mutations in genes associated with hearing, naked mole-rats can barely hear the constant squeaking they use to communicate with one another. (2020-09-03)
Keeping the beat - it's all in your brain
How do people coordinate their actions with the sounds they hear? (2020-09-01)
Wireless, optical cochlear implant uses LED lights to restore hearing in rodents
Scientists have created an optical cochlear implant based on LED lights that can safely and partially restore the sensation of hearing in deaf rats and gerbils. (2020-07-22)
Researchers identify subject-specific component to perceptual learning ability
Ph.D. candidate YANG Jia and her colleagues, under the guidance of Prof. (2020-07-21)
Hair cell loss causes age-related hearing loss
Age-related hearing loss has more to do with the death of hair cells than the cellular battery powering them wearing out, according to new research in JNeurosci. (2020-07-20)
Blood vessels communicate with sensory neurons to decide their fate
The researchers, using real-time videos, have discovered that both the neurons and the cells of blood vessels emit dynamic protrusions to be able to 'talk' to each other. (2020-07-16)
Study finds hidden emotions in the sound of words
In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, it's common to feel stress levels rise every time we hear the word ''virus.'' But new Cornell-led research reveals that the sound of the word itself was likely to raise your blood pressure - even before ''corona'' was added to it. (2020-07-14)
Our animal inheritance: Humans perk up their ears, too, when they hear interesting sounds
Many animals move their ears to better focus their attention on a novel sound. (2020-07-07)
Artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark, research
Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research. (2020-07-07)
Auditory hallucinations rooted in aberrant brain connectivity
A study from researchers at the University of Geneva Medical School, Switzerland reports that auditory hallucinations, a phenomenon in which people hear voices or other sounds, may arise through altered brain connectivity between sensory and cognitive processing areas. (2020-06-30)
New study shows how tests of hearing can reveal HIV's effects on the brain
Findings from a new study published in Clinical Neurophysiology, involving a collaborative effort between Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University, are shedding further light on how the brain's auditory system may provide a window into how the brain is affected by HIV. (2020-06-29)
Variability in natural speech is challenging for the dyslexic brain
A new study brings neural-level evidence that the continuous variation in natural speech makes the discrimination of phonemes challenging for adults suffering from developmental reading-deficit dyslexia. (2020-06-25)
The relationship between looking/listening and human emotions
Toyohashi University of Technology has indicated that the relationship between attentional states in response to pictures and sounds and the emotions elicited by them may be different in visual perception and auditory perception. (2020-06-19)
Neurons can shift how they process information about motion
New research from the University of Rochester indicates some neurons can shift to process information about movement depending on the brain's current frame of reference. (2020-06-15)
Hallucinations in people with seizures may point to suicide risk
A study from scientists at Trinity College Dublin and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland shows that 8% of individuals with a history of seizures report hallucinations, including experiences of hearing or seeing things that are not based in reality. (2020-06-11)
Sounds of sickness: Perceptions of coughs, sneezes not diagnosed accurately
You're standing in the store's check-out line, and the customer behind you viciously coughs. (2020-06-10)
Mozart may reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy
A new clinical research study by Dr. Marjan Rafiee and Dr. (2020-06-10)
Vision loss influences perception of sound
People with severe vision loss can less accurately judge the distance of nearby sounds, potentially putting them more at risk of injury. (2020-06-03)
Gene discovery in fruit flies 'opens new doors' for hearing loss cure in elderly
Scientists at UCL have discovered sets of regulatory genes, which are responsible for maintaining healthy hearing. (2020-06-02)
Smart devices should space out vibrations to maximize user alert benefits
A research team led by Yale-NUS College Assistant Professor of Social Sciences (Psychology) Christopher Asplund and Singapore University of Technology and Design's Assistant Professor Simon Perrault found that haptic feedback (such as vibration feedback) causes distraction, but this loss of focus lasts only for about one second. (2020-06-02)
The evolutionary puzzle of the mammalian ear
How could the tiny parts of the ear adapt independently to the diverse functional and environmental regimes encountered in mammals? (2020-05-27)
Schizophrenia: When the thalamus misleads the ear
Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Synapsy National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) have succeeded in linking the onset of auditory hallucinations - one of the most common symptoms of schizophrenia - with the abnormal development of certain substructures of a region deep in the brain called the thalamus. (2020-05-26)
Learning what's dangerous is costly, but social animals have a way of lowering the price
For social animals, such as humans, being able to recognize the presence of a threat in the behavior of others could literally be a life-saver. (2020-05-12)
Outsmarting the enemy: Treefrogs rely on illusions to find a mate without being eaten
Researchers at Purdue University have discovered that male treefrogs reduce their attractiveness to predators and parasites by overlapping their mating calls with their neighbors. (2020-05-06)
Origins of human language pathway in the brain at least 25 million years old
The human language pathway in the brain has been identified by scientists as being at least 25 million years old -- 20 million years older than previously thought. (2020-04-20)
Skin that computes
As our body's largest and most prominent organ, the skin also provides one of our most fundamental connections to the world around us. (2020-04-15)
Ear's inner secrets revealed with new technology
What does it actually look like deep inside our ears? (2020-04-09)
Changes in brain attention may underlie autism
New research in JNeurosci explores how a particular region of the brainstem might explain differences in attention in people with autism. (2020-04-06)
New research sheds light on potentially negative effects of cannabis
Coughing fits, anxiety and paranoia are three of the most common adverse reactions to cannabis, according to a recent study by Washington State University researchers. (2020-03-30)
High-resolution PET/CT assesses brain stem function in patients with hearing impairment
Novel, fully digital, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of small brain stem nuclei can provide clinicians with valuable information concerning the auditory pathway in patients with hearing impairment, according to a new study published in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-03-25)
How the brain controls the voice
A particular neuronal circuit in the brains of bats controls their vocalisations. (2020-03-20)
Trauma relapse in a novel context may be preventable
Korea Brain Research Institute (KBRI, President: Pann-Ghill Suh) announced on February 10 that its research team led by Dr. (2020-03-18)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.