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Current Auditory News and Events, Auditory News Articles.
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Trauma relapse in a novel context may be preventable
Korea Brain Research Institute (KBRI, President: Pann-Ghill Suh) announced on February 10 that its research team led by Dr. (2020-03-18)
Men can smell when a woman is sexually aroused
University of Kent research suggests that men can distinguish between the scents of sexually aroused and non-aroused women. (2020-03-03)
Using a cappella to explain speech and music specialization
Speech and music are two fundamentally human activities that are decoded in different brain hemispheres. (2020-02-27)
How the brain separates words from song
The perception of speech and music -- two of the most uniquely human uses of sound -- is enabled by specialized neural systems in different brain hemispheres adapted to respond differently to specific features in the acoustic structure of the song, a new study reports. (2020-02-27)
Binaural beats synchronize brain activity, don't affect mood
An auditory illusion thought to synchronize brain waves and alter mood is no more effective than other sounds, according to research in adults recently published in eNeuro. (2020-02-17)
Bush-crickets' ears unlock the science to developing revolutionary hearing sensors
Scientists could revolutionise auditory devices used for monitoring and surveillance purposes after new research into bush-crickets' ear canals found that they have evolved to work in the same way as mammals' ears to amplify sound and modulate sound pressure. (2020-02-11)
Sensory perception is not superficial brain work
How does the brain decide which of the senses it will focus attention on when two interact? (2020-02-10)
Research team investigates abnormal neuron activity in Rett syndrome
Research by Billy Lau, a postdoctoral researcher working with Assistant Professor Keerthi Krishnan at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, examines the time during which an adult female mouse first learns to recognize and respond to the distress cries of young mouse pups as an opportunity for the brain to rewire and learn again. (2020-01-29)
Mouse brain region processes sound and motion at the same time
New insight on how information relating to sound and movement is processed in the brain has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-01-28)
Biomarkers of brain function may lead to clinical tests for hidden hearing loss
A pair of biomarkers of brain function -- one that represents 'listening effort,' and another that measures ability to process rapid changes in frequencies -- may help to explain why a person with normal hearing may struggle to follow conversations in noisy environments, according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers. (2020-01-28)
Abnormal neuron activity manifests as parental neglect
The malleability of the brain decreases with age, but scientists have identified certain life experiences that allow the adult brain to rewire. (2020-01-08)
Hearing through lip-reading
Brain activity synchronizes with sound waves, even without audible sound, through lip-reading, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-01-02)
Researchers reconstruct spoken words as processed in nonhuman primate brains
Using a brain-computer interface, a team of researchers has reconstructed English words from the brain activity of rhesus macaques that listened as the words were spoken. (2019-12-13)
Play sports for a healthier brain
There have been many headlines in recent years about the potentially negative impacts contact sports can have on athletes' brains. (2019-12-09)
New early Cretaceous mammal fossils bridge a transitional gap in ear's evolution
Fossils of a previously unknown species of Early Cretaceous mammal have caught in the act the final steps by which mammals' multi-boned middle ears evolved, according to a new study. (2019-12-05)
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules
A joint research team led by MAO Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and MENG Jin from the American Museum of Natural History reported a new symmetrodont, Origolestes lii, a stem therian mammal from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota, in China's Liaoning Province. (2019-12-05)
A week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing in adult mice
New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. (2019-12-04)
New Cretaceous mammal fossil sheds light on evolution of middle ear
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) have reported a new species of multituberculate -- a type of extinct Mesozoic rodent -- with well-preserved middle ear bones from the Cretaceous Jehol Biota of China. (2019-11-27)
AI to determine when to intervene with your driving
Can your AI agent judge when to talk to you while you are driving? (2019-11-13)
UTSA researchers discover new pathways in brain's amygdala
The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) researchers are pioneering an innovative brain study that sheds light on how the amygdala portion of the brain functions and could contribute to a better understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression and Alzheimer's disease. (2019-11-12)
Good noise, bad noise: White noise improves hearing
Noise is not the same as noise -- and even a quiet environment does not have the same effect as white noise. (2019-11-12)
Enjoyment of pop music classics linked to combination of uncertainty and surprise
Why is it that people find songs such as James Taylor's 'Country Roads,' UB40's 'Red, Red Wine,' or The Beatles' 'Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da' so irresistibly enjoyable? (2019-11-07)
Not so quiet, please
A research team at the University of California, Riverside, has found exposure to sound -- not sound reduction -- during early development of mice engineered to have Fragile X Syndrome, or FXS, restores molecular, cellular, and functional properties in the auditory cortex, the area of the brain that processes sounds. (2019-11-06)
Study reveals how brain injury can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder in U.S. military members frequently follows a concussion-like brain injury. (2019-11-04)
The fetal brain possesses adult-like networks
The fundamental organization of brain networks is established in utero during the second and third trimesters of fetal development, according to research published in JNeurosci. (2019-11-04)
For better research results, let mice be mice
Animal models can serve as gateways for understanding many human communication disorders, but a new study from the University at Buffalo suggests that the established practice of socially isolating mice for such purposes might actually make them poor research models for humans, and a simple shift to a more realistic social environment could greatly improve the utility of the future studies. (2019-10-24)
How the brain dials up the volume to hear someone in a crowd
Our brains have a remarkable ability to pick out one voice from among many. (2019-10-21)
Make some noise: How background noise affects brain activity
Have you ever found it difficult to focus on a task due to background noise? (2019-10-18)
EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
Working with clinicians from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, a team of EPFL researchers has developed a conformable electrode implant that will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again. (2019-10-16)
'I predict your words': that is how we understand what others say to us
We are at a fun but noisy party: how can we understand the words someone is saying to us despite the background music and voices? (2019-10-15)
Uncovering the presynaptic distribution and profile of mitochondria
In a recent study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, scientists from the MPFI and the University of Iowa CCOM have provided unprecedented insight into the presynaptic distribution and profile of mitochondria in the developing and mature calyx of Held. (2019-10-09)
Implanted memories teach birds a song
A new songbird study that shows memories can be implanted in the brain to teach vocalizations -- without any lessons from the parent. (2019-10-03)
The propensity to hear 'voices' in Schizophrenia may be established by infancy
Findings reveal how auditory hallucinations may arise in patients with schizophrenia and provide potential new targets for early detection and treatment. (2019-10-02)
Mild-to-moderate hearing loss in children leads to changes in how brain processes sound
Deafness in early childhood is known to lead to lasting changes in how sounds are processed in the brain, but new research published today in eLife shows that even mild-to-moderate levels of hearing loss in young children can lead to similar changes. (2019-10-01)
New genes identified in hearing loss, providing treatment hope
A new study published today in The American Journal of Human Genetics has identified 44 genes linked to age-related hearing loss giving a much clearer understanding of how the condition develops and potential treatments. (2019-09-26)
How the brain repurposes unused regions
In adults that are born blind, the 'visual' cortex is activated in a similar way during a listening task, according to new research in JNeurosci. (2019-09-23)
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
Neuroscientists (UNIGE) analysed how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant. (2019-09-20)
Lab develops novel approach to study sound recognition in acoustically orienting animals
A new study by Dr. Norman Lee, in collaboration with St. (2019-09-20)
Brain imaging shows how nonverbal children with autism have slower response to sounds
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques to determine how nonverbal or minimally verbal people who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD) processes auditory stimuli, which could have important diagnostic and prognostic implications across the autism spectrum. (2019-09-18)
How our brain filters sounds
When two identical sounds are repeated quickly, a filter reduces the attention that the brain directs to the second sound it hears. (2019-09-06)
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