Current Aurora News and Events

Current Aurora News and Events, Aurora News Articles.
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Stirring up conflicts in tumour cells
With two commercially available inhibitors, the cell cycle of the cancer cells in the childhood tumour neuroblastoma can be disrupted at a key point causing tumour cell death. (2021-02-11)

Front-of-package product names and ingredient lists of infant and toddler food can be hard to navigate
Early exposure to nutritious foods may help children develop more healthful eating habits, but package labels can make it difficult for parents to understand what they are feeding their young children, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier. (2021-02-08)

Reviewing the evidence for cloth mask use among health care workers
A rapid, evidence-based review summarizes the effectiveness of cloth masks in protecting health care clinicians from respiratory viral infections, such as COVID-19. Nine studies were included in the review, and all but one were conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-12)

College football players underestimate risk of injury and concussion
College football players may underestimate their risk of injury and concussion, according to a new study published today in JAMA Network Open. Christine Baugh, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and member of the CU Center for Bioethics and Humanities, is the corresponding author of the article, ''Accuracy of US College Football Players' Estimates of Their Risk of Concussion or Injury.'' (2020-12-29)

Study published on the well-being of small business workers during COVID-19
This study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, examined whether safety and health climates were related to employee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of small businesses. (2020-12-21)

Study shows incorporating telemedicine helps surgical practices
A new study that records patient volume at Stony Brook Medicine's Bariatric and Metabolic Weight Loss Center reveals that follow-up telehealth visits are highly effective during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study, published in the December issue of the Annals of Surgery, serves as an example that surgical practices can continue to thrive with the help of telemedicine during the pandemic. (2020-12-18)

Number of childhood, adolescent vaccinations administered before, after COVID-19 outbreak in Colorado
Using data from the Colorado Immunization Information System, this study suggests vaccination uptake in children and adolescents has decreased in Colorado since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak in that state. (2020-12-07)

How plants compete for underground real estate affects climate change and food production
How do plant roots store carbon? Princeton researchers found that the energy a plant devotes to its roots depends on proximity to other plants: when close together, plants heavily invest in their root systems to compete for finite underground resources; if far apart, they invest less. As about a third of the world's vegetation biomass (and carbon) is belowground, this model provides a valuable tool to predict root proliferation in global earth-system models. (2020-12-03)

Killer electrons in strumming sky lights
Wisps of pulsating aurora lights are a rare, yet magical sight. Now, scientists suggest they could be associated with destruction of part of the ozone. (2020-11-30)

Aurora-chasing citizen scientists help discover a new feature of STEVE
A new finding about the formation of streaks within the aurora-like STEVE phenomenon brings scientists one step closer to solving the mystery. (2020-11-13)

IVF success rates higher at clinics that provide more outcomes data
Success rates for in vitro fertilization are higher at clinics that voluntarily share more information than required by government regulators, according to new research by faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. In a review of data reported between 2014 and 2017, CU researchers found that clinics that reported more data than required by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had higher rates of success in achieving pregnancy and birth. (2020-10-18)

A cancer shredder
Researchers at the universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt (Germany) have developed a new compound for treating cancer. It destroys a protein that triggers its development. (2020-09-29)

SwRI instruments aboard Rosetta help detect unexpected ultraviolet aurora at a comet
Data from Southwest Research Institute-led instruments aboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft have helped reveal auroral emissions in the far ultraviolet around a comet for the first time. (2020-09-21)

Comet Chury's ultraviolet aurora
On Earth, auroras, also called northern lights, have always fascinated people. An international consortium involving the University of Bern has now discovered such auroras in the ultraviolet wavelength range at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Chury for short. This phenomenon was detected thanks to the analysis of data from the European Space Agency ESA's Rosetta mission. (2020-09-21)

New insights into evolution of gene expression
The long-term expression of genes in vertebrate organs predisposes these genes to be subsequently utilized in other organs during evolution. The scientists Kenji Fukushima and David D. Pollock report this finding in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-08)

Men with larger waists more likely to die of prostate cancer
A study of more than 200,000 UK men, being presented at this year's European and International Conference on Obesity (ECOICO), held online this year from September 1-4, reveals that there is a link between central adiposity (concentration of body fat around the belly and waist) and the risk of death from prostate cancer. (2020-09-01)

Aurora mysteries unlocked with NASA's THEMIS mission
A special type of aurora, draped east-west across the night sky like a glowing pearl necklace, is helping scientists better understand the science of auroras and their powerful drivers out in space. (2020-08-14)

Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out of existence
The Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word ''wimpy'' to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around. An Opinion paper publishing on August 6, 2020 in the journal Trends in Genetics outlines a new theory--called the 'persistent Y hypothesis'--to explain why the Y chromosome may be more resilient than it first appears. (2020-08-06)

Pulmonary fibrosis treatment shows proof of principle
A pre-clinical study led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's demonstrates that in mice the drug barasertib reverses the activation of fibroblasts that cause dangerous scar tissue to build up in the lungs of people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). (2020-08-06)

Alaskan seismometers record the northern lights
Aaron Lojewski, who leads aurora sightseeing tours in Alaska, was lucky enough to photograph a ''eruption'' of brilliant pink light in the night skies one night in February. The same perturbations of the Earth's magnetic field that lit up the sky for Lojewski's camera were also captured by seismometers on the ground, a team of researchers reports in the journal Seismological Research Letters. (2020-07-29)

Researchers discover 'Marie Kondo' protein which aids in organizing fruit fly embryos
Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered a protein in fruit fly embryos, dubbed Marie Kondo, that destroys maternal proteins. Much like namesake, author and clutter consultant Marie Kondo, this gene removes unnecessary molecules, keeping embryos organized. (2020-07-28)

New protein complex gets chromosomes sorted
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have identified a novel protein complex that regulates Aurora B localization to ensure that chromosomes are correctly separated during cell division. The complex, NWC, is made up of three proteins: NOL11, WDR43, and Cirhin. In the absence of NWC, Aurora B did not accumulate at centromeres, and chromosome movement and alignment were impaired. Together, these results show that NWC is required for faithful chromosome segregation. (2020-06-26)

MAVEN maps electric currents around mars that are fundamental to atmospheric loss
Five years after NASA's MAVEN spacecraft entered into orbit around Mars, data from the mission has led to the creation of a map of electric current systems in the Martian atmosphere. (2020-05-26)

Outcomes of rapid virtualization of psychiatric care
Questions about how the COVID-19 pandemic will alter telepsychiatry practice are examined in this article. (2020-05-11)

Telehealth during COVID-19 may lead to better outcomes for diabetes patients
A new study has shown that for some patients with type 1 diabetes the close monitoring of their condition using telehealth protocols combined with appropriate technology may lead to better care during the COVID-19 pandemic, when patients are avoiding in-person visits. (2020-05-11)

Study pinpoints metrics of cost-effective screening for type 1 diabetes
Led by Marian Rewers, MD, Ph.D., at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, the Autoimmunity Screening for Kids (ASK) study has screened 25,000 children between 1-17 years old in the Denver metro area. Results are promising and show that screening can greatly reduce the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening complication of diabetes that is present in more than half of newly diagnosed children in Colorado. (2020-05-05)

Tele-diabetes to manage new-onset diabetes during COVID-19 pandemic
Two new case studies highlight the use of tele-diabetes to manage new-onset type 1 diabetes in an adult and an infant during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-04-21)

Modern science reveals ancient secret in Japanese literature
Nearly a millennium and a half ago, red light streaked the night sky over Japan. Witnesses compared it to the tail of a pheasant -- it appeared as a fan of beautiful red feathers stretched across the sky. Since the event, scientists have studied the witness accounts written in the year 620 A.D. and speculated about what the cosmic phenomenon could have actually been. Now, researchers from The Graduate University for Advanced Studies may have found the answer. (2020-03-28)

Study suggests no evidence of association between rotavirus vaccination, type 1 diabetes in kids
Findings in this observational study of almost 387,000 children born in the US don't show evidence of an association between rotavirus vaccination (routinely recommended for all infants by age 8 months) and type 1 diabetes in children who were followed over a range of about 5 years. Researchers explain limitations of the study, as well as two potential unmeasured confounding variables that may have affected results. (2020-03-09)

Resurrecting ancient protein partners reveals origin of protein regulation
After reconstructing the ancient forms of two cellular proteins, scientists discovered the earliest known instance of a complex form of protein regulation. (2020-03-06)

A new model of the worm C. elegans to progress in the study of a rare disease
he IDIBELL Neurometabolic Diseases group, with international collaboration, has identified a model of chromosome X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (x-ALD) in the earthworm C. elegans, this is a rare disorder of the nervous system with no treatment available. (2020-02-19)

Verifying forecasts for major stratospheric sudden warmings
A new study sought to verify multi-system forecasts for major stratospheric sudden warmings using hindcasts of four systems archived in the subseasonal-to-seasonal prediction project database. (2020-02-17)

Solar wind samples suggest new physics of massive solar ejections
A new study led by the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa has helped refine understanding of the amount of hydrogen, helium and other elements present in violent outbursts from the Sun, and other types of solar 'wind,' a stream of ionized atoms ejected from the Sun. (2020-02-14)

Wilderness Medical Society issues important new clinical practice guidelines
The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) has released new clinical practice guidelines in a supplement to Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, published by Elsevier. This issue features updates to previously published clinical practice guidelines and newly developed guidelines on diabetes management and spinal immobilization in the wilderness setting. (2020-02-05)

Teens with obesity and PCOS have more 'unhealthy' bacteria
Teens with obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have more 'unhealthy' gut bacteria suggesting the microbiome may play a role in the disorder, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-01-23)

Final images from Cassini spacecraft
Researchers are busy analysing some of the final data sent back from the Cassini spacecraft which has been in orbit around Saturn for more than 13 years until the end of its mission in September 2017. For the last leg of its journey, Cassini was put on a particularly daring orbit passing between Saturn and its rings which brought it closer to Saturn than ever before, allowing scientists to obtain images of Saturn's ultraviolet auroras in unprecedented resolution. (2020-01-14)

A step closer to understanding evolution -- mitochondrial division conserved across species
A group of scientists at Tokyo University of Science showed for the first time that in red algae, an enzyme that is usually involved in cell division also plays a role in replication of mitochondria -- a crucial cell organelle. Moreover, they discovered a similar mechanism in human cells, leading them to believe that the process by which mitochondria replicate is similar across all eukaryotic species -- from simple to complex organisms. (2019-12-20)

Martian aurora offers climate change clues, Embry-Riddle reports
A newly published study reveals that a type of Martian aurora originally detected by NASA's MAVEN spacecraft is in fact the most common aurora on the Red Planet, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers said. The research suggests a way to track water loss and better understand how the Martian climate has changed over time. (2019-12-12)

Newfound Martian aurora actually the most common; sheds light on Mars' changing climate
A type of Martian aurora first identified by NASA's MAVEN spacecraft in 2016 is actually the most common form of aurora occurring on the Red Planet, according to new results from the mission. The aurora is known as a proton aurora and can help scientists track water loss from Mars' atmosphere. (2019-12-12)

Satellite imagery shows Typhoon Kammuri's center obscured
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP or S-NPP satellite passed over the Philippine Sea in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found Typhoon Kammuri's eye obscured. (2019-12-02)

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