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Orbits of ancient stars prompt rethink on Milky Way evolution
Theories on how the Milky Way formed are set to be rewritten following discoveries about the behaviour of some of its oldest stars. An investigation into the orbits of the Galaxy's metal-poor stars - assumed to be among the most ancient in existence - has found that some of them travel in previously unpredicted patterns. (2020-11-16)

Schools unfairly targeting vulnerable children with exclusion policies
Australian schools are unfairly suspending and excluding students - particularly boys, Indigenous students, and students with a disability - according to new research from the University of South Australia. (2020-11-10)

Shining a light on the issue of wine fraud
University of Adelaide wine researchers are developing a fast and simple method of authenticating wine - a potential solution against the estimated billions of dollars' worth of wine fraud globally, but also offering a possible means of building regional branding. (2020-11-05)

Social media can guide public pandemic policy: QUT research
As global cases of COVID-19 fast approach 50 million, a team of Australian, Afghan, Iranian and Italian researchers examined more than 35,000 tweets and say social media analytics can capture the attitudes and perceptions of the public during a pandemic. They also suggest social media is now the best way to encourage people to follow measures and restrictions which have, in turn, triggered an increase in the use of digital technologies and platforms. (2020-11-04)

Magma 'conveyor belt' fuelled world's longest erupting supervolcanoes
International research led by geologists from Curtin University has found that a volcanic province in the Indian Ocean was the world's most continuously active -- erupting for 30 million years -- fuelled by a constantly moving 'conveyor belt' of magma. (2020-11-03)

Removing this hidden nasty from our food could save thousands of lives
Banning a harmful ingredient from the Australian food supply could prevent thousands of deaths from heart disease according to new research from The George Institute for Global Health. (2020-11-02)

First Australian night bees recorded foraging in darkness
Australian bees are known for pollinating plants on beautiful sunny days, but a new study has identified two species that have adapted their vision for night-time conditions for the first time. The study by a team of ecology researchers has observed night time foraging behaviour by a nomiine (Reepenia bituberculata) and masked (Meroglossa gemmata) bee species, with both developing enlarged compound and simple eyes which allow more light to be gathered when compared to their daytime kin. (2020-10-30)

Drones as stinger spotters
Researchers from James Cook University in Cairns have demonstrated, for the first time, the potential for off-the-shelf drones to be used to detect deadly box jellyfish. (2020-10-29)

Chronic disease and public health failures fuel COVID-19 pandemic
Australia was not spared as a 30-year global rise in chronic illness and related risk factors such as obesity, high blood sugar, and outdoor air pollution created a perfect storm to fuel coronavirus (COVID-19) deaths, new research shows. (2020-10-15)

Potential COVID-19 vaccines not affected by dominant "G-Strain"
Vaccines currently being developed for COVID-19 should not be affected by recent mutations in the virus, according to a new study involving a University of York virologist. (2020-10-08)

The benefits of a prostate cancer screening tool
Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate (mpMRIp) is a promising tool for diagnosing prostate cancer, and prior to its availability, detection relied on clinical exams and prostate specific antigen screening. (2020-10-07)

Astronomers turn up the heavy metal to shed light on star formation
Astronomers from The University of Western Australia's node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) have developed a new way to study star formation in galaxies from the dawn of time to today. Using a new algorithm to model the energy and wavelengths of light coming from almost 7000 nearby galaxies, the researchers succeeded in reconstructing when most of the stars in the Universe formed--in agreement with telescope observations for the first time. (2020-10-06)

The proof is in the pudding
As Australia's aged care sector continues to be scrutinised, researchers at the University of South Australia show that plain solutions are often the best, with a new study finding that aged care residents can improve their nutrition intake simply by increasing their meal sizes. (2020-09-30)

Potential for natural forest regrowth to capture carbon
A major new study that maps potential aboveground carbon accumulation rates for forest regrowth across the globe. (2020-09-29)

Covert tobacco industry marketing tactics exposed by former employees
Tobacco companies use covert marketing tactics and exploit loopholes in Australian tobacco control laws to promote their products despite current tobacco advertising bans, finds new research from University of Sydney and Cancer Council NSW. To circumvent current tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) laws in Australia, tobacco companies are incentivising retailers with cash payments, all-expenses paid holidays, exclusive parties and tickets to sporting events to drive tobacco sales. (2020-09-28)

Insomnia treatment offers relief
Insomnia causing sleepless nights, daytime fatigue and poor health outcomes is a cycle worth busting, experts say, with depression, anxiety and stress a common co-occurrence. A study of more than 450 insomnia patients in Australia has confirmed some positive results for such patients with insomnia. (2020-09-23)

'Save me Seymour!'
New international research led by Curtin University has found approximately a quarter of carnivorous plant species across the world may be at risk of extinction due to global climate change, illegal poaching, and the clearing of land for agriculture, mining and development. (2020-09-23)

Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate. University of Queensland researchers found 92 endangered and 11 critically endangered species of seafood were caught in oceans around the world after analysing global industrial fishing records. (2020-09-21)

Freshwater biology: Turtle scavenging critical to freshwater ecosystem health
Freshwater turtles may have a role in regulating water quality in river systems by scavenging fish carcasses, suggests a study of Emydura macquarii, a vulnerable freshwater turtle species found in Australia. The findings are published in Scientific Reports. (2020-09-17)

Biggest fish in the sea are girls
Female whale sharks grow more slowly than males but end up being larger, research suggests. (2020-09-16)

Lifestyle improvements may lessen cognitive decline
Results from a new study suggest that lifestyle changes may help to improve cognition in older adults experiencing cognitive decline that precedes dementia. (2020-09-10)

Australian telescope finds no signs of alien technology in 10 million star systems
A radio telescope in outback Western Australia has completed the deepest and broadest search at low frequencies for alien technologies, scanning a patch of sky known to include at least 10 million stars. Astronomers used the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope to explore hundreds of times more broadly than any previous search for extraterrestrial life. (2020-09-09)

Australian scientists discover new corals on most comprehensive deep-sea study of GBR
For the first time, scientists have viewed the deepest regions of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, discovered five undescribed species consisting of black corals and sponges, and recorded Australia's first observation of an extremely rare fish. (2020-09-09)

Images of captive torment in art
Between the arrival of pearl divers and war brides - long after Japanese performers toured Australia 150 years ago - an untold chapter of World War Two history has emerged in a new study of wartime art made by almost 5000 prisoners of war in Australia and New Zealand. Focusing on internment camps set up across Australia and NZ, Canterbury University and Flinders University art historians Richard Bullen and Tets Kimura examine some exquisite Japanese artworks produced during the extended period of war incarceration. (2020-09-04)

Venom from honeybees found to kill aggressive breast cancer cells
Honeybee venom induces cancer cell death in hard to treat triple-negative breast cancer with minimal effect on healthy cells (2020-09-01)

COVID-19 exposes broadband gaps
The COVID-19 crisis has increasingly highlighted shortcomings in Australia's National Broadband Network, Flinders University experts say. With access to high-speed broadband (HSB) and the internet via the NBN now central to people's livelihoods, education, healthcare delivery and even social connections, the Flinders University researchers say the ''short-term politics of the 2013 federal election'' led to decisions which caused an expensive rollout and current problems with the network. (2020-08-28)

The northern quoll: An amazingly versatile survivor?
The northern quoll, one of Australia's most adorable and endangered native carnivores, appears to be adapted to dramatically different landscapes -- which may be key to the species' survival. University of Queensland Ph.D. candidate Pietro Viacava co-led a study that found similarities between northern quoll skulls across a 5000 kilometre range, which has raised hopes scientists will be able to cross-breed isolated populations. (2020-08-27)

First review of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 infection models
The first comprehensive review of all relevant animal and cellular models of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 aims to assist with fast-tracking ongoing research into new preventions and treatments. (2020-08-24)

Australia's wish list of exotic pets
Unsustainable trade of species is the major pathway for the introduction of invasive alien species at distant localities at higher frequencies. It is also a major driver of over-exploitation of wild populations. In a new study, published in the open-access journal Neobiota, scientists estimate the desire of Australians to own non-native and/or illegal pets and the major trends in this practice. In addition, the team suggests ways to improve biosecurity awareness in the country. (2020-08-20)

Climate change impact on green energy production
As the climate of the planet is changing, many researchers are looking to more renewable energy sources. In the Journal of Sustainable and Renewable Energy, researchers investigate whether the power generated by solar and wind farms would differ between current and future climates. The researchers focused on sites in Australia where variable renewable generators are located or are likely to be located in the future based on the Australian Energy Market Operator's system plan. (2020-08-18)

Farmers help grow water plan
Overallocation of surface water for growing food crops is shifting agriculture and other industry to use groundwater - which is much more difficult to measure and monitor. Using local producer knowledge as 'soft data' to estimate groundwater use in modelling is a helpful tool in mapping sustainable use of scarce resources, Flinders University experts say. (2020-08-17)

Food safety model may help pandemic management
No precedent exists for managing the COVID-19 pandemic - although a plan for working through major public food scares may point to the best ways of alerting and communicating with the public. (2020-08-17)

Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years
Archaeologists at The Australian National University have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia. The evidence of cultivation and plant management dates back 2,145 years and was found at Wagadagam on the tiny island of Mabuyag in the western Torres Strait. The research is led by a First Australian author. His work makes a statement that goes beyond academia. (2020-08-11)

Personal connections key to climate adaptation
Connections with friends and family are key to helping communities adapt to the devastating impact of climate change on their homes and livelihoods. The research found people are more empowered to deal with the impact of encroaching sea-levels and dwindling fish stocks when they see others doing the same. (2020-08-10)

Heavier smoking linked to skyrocketing health risks
Each cigarette smoked a day by heavier smokers increases the risk of contracting some diseases by more than 30 per cent, according to a new international study published today. (2020-08-07)

Sports settings may help engage Australian men in weight loss
Men in Australia are more likely than women to be obese, yet they are underrepresented in weight loss trials. A study published in PLOS Medicine, by Eleanor Quested at Curtin University in Perth, Australia and colleagues found that participants in a men-only, sports-themed weight loss program increased physical activity and lost more weight than men who had not participated, suggesting that men with overweight and obesity may benefit from similarly designed programs. (2020-08-06)

Herbicide harming marsupial health and development, research finds
Researchers exposed the adult female tammar wallabies to atrazine contaminated water throughout pregnancy, birth and lactation to help establish the extent of harm being caused by the chemical. They then examined the reproductive development of their young by assessing their growth and development to establish that the herbicide is causing major abnormalities in the male reproductive system in many animals. (2020-08-05)

Dingoes have gotten bigger over the last 80 years - and pesticides might be to blame
The average size of a dingo is increasing, but only in areas where poison-baits are used, a collaborative study led by UNSW Sydney shows. (2020-08-03)

Climate change: Coastal flooding could threaten up to 20% of global GDP
Coastal flooding events could threaten assets worth up to 20% of the global GDP by 2100, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. The areas predicted to be most impacted by flooding are north-west Europe, south-east and east Asia, north-east USA and northern Australia, according to the authors. (2020-07-30)

Curtin research finds first African carder bees to reach Western Australia
Curtin research has recorded the first known appearance of Pseudoanthidium (Immanthidium) repetitum, the African carder bee, in Western Australia and has highlighted the need to closely monitor the impacts of such introduced species on the ecosystem. (2020-07-29)

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