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Sleep studies in children with sleep disordered breathing could influence treatment
A new study recommends healthy children with symptoms of sleep disordered breathing, such as snoring or temporary cessation of breathing, should consider undergoing a sleep study (polysomnography) and should discuss the potential benefits of this with their pediatrician or otolaryngologist to possibly manage the child's symptoms medically and before surgery. (2021-02-05)

COVID-19: Schools urgently need guidelines on improving ventilation in classrooms
There is an urgent need for guidelines on how schools can use ventilation to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission in the classroom, according to doctors at Imperial College London and the headteacher of a secondary school in Pinner, Middlesex. (2021-02-05)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

Study: Many summer camps don't require childhood immunizations
Nearly half of summer camps surveyed by researchers didn't have official policies requiring campers be vaccinated, and just 39% mandated staffers be vaccinated. (2021-01-13)

COVID-19 in Victorian schools and childcare mainly driven by community transmission
COVID-19 cases in schools, early childhood education centers and childcare are mainly driven by community transmission. Off-site learning should therefore be a last resort, a new Australian report has found. (2020-12-04)

New study debunks blood type diet
A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics by researchers with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine -- a nonprofit of 12,000 doctors -- debunks the 'blood type diet' by finding that blood type was not associated with the effects of a plant-based diet on body weight, body fat, plasma lipid concentrations, or glycemic control. (2020-12-04)

Teacher quality scores change depending on students, school, PSU study finds
School districts across the U.S. are increasingly using student test scores to rate the effectiveness of teachers, but a new Portland State University study found that the scores have less to do with individual teachers and more to do with their students and the schools. (2020-11-12)

Key populations for early COVID-19 immunization in Canada
Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends vaccinating key populations, such as people at risk of severe illness or death, those at risk of transmitting the virus and essential workers, during the initial rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine in Canada. The preliminary guidance, developed for the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-11-03)

Canada should approve HIV self-testing
Canada should integrate self-testing for HIV into the health system to help reduce the burden of the disease, argues a commentary published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201160. (2020-11-02)

New research predicts whether rheumatoid arthritis patients will respond to treatment
A new study led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London provides potential novel biomarkers for predicting patient responsiveness to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). (2020-10-27)

Report calls for easing access, improving home health for older adults
Older adults have suffered disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic, with increased risk of severe illness and death reported across the globe. A new report argues that one policy change made during the pandemic should remain in place after the novel coronavirus virus fades away: better access to home health services through Medicare. In a set of recommendations published by the Commonwealth Fund, researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and Duke University argue for regulatory changes to expand the Medicare home health benefit. (2020-10-22)

Tattoo inks: risk assessment for Pigment Blue 15:3 and Pigment Green 7
To date, there is no binding regulation governing the components used in tattoo inks at the European level. The EU Commission and member states are currently consulting on a proposal from the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) for a uniform set of legislation within all member states. This proposal foresees a restriction under the European Chemicals Regulation (REACH), by means of which dangerous substances in consumer products can be banned or their use can be restricted. (2020-10-06)

Sexual minority men who smoke report worse mental health and more frequent substance use
Cigarette smoking is associated with frequent substance use and poor behavioral and physical health in sexual and gender minority populations, according to Rutgers researchers. The study, published in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine, examined tobacco use by sexual minority men and transgender women to better understand the relationships between smoking, substance use and mental, psychosocial and general health. (2020-09-09)

AGA recommends bidirectional endoscopy for most patients with iron deficiency anemia
The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published new clinical guidelines outlining an evidence-based approach for the initial gastrointestinal evaluation of chronic iron deficiency anemia in asymptomatic patients. Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common worldwide, and a gastrointestinal cause should be considered in all patients without an obvious cause for their anemia. (2020-09-01)

Study confirms link between influenza, heart complications
The link between influenza and serious heart conditions just grew stronger. A CDC study looking at more than 80,000 adult patients hospitalized with flu over eight seasons found that sudden, serious heart complications were common, occurring in 12% of patients, or 1 in 8. The study, published Aug. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, underscores the importance of getting a flu shot early, and the impact of respiratory infections on the heart. (2020-08-27)

American Cancer Society updates guideline for cervical cancer screening
An updated cervical cancer screening guideline from the American Cancer Society reflects the rapidly changing landscape of cervical cancer prevention in the United States, calling for less and more simplified screening. (2020-07-30)

To end King Coal's reign, must his most loyal subjects get paid?
Governments should be prepared to pay billions of pounds to operators of coal-fired power plants in agreements to shut down their plants early, a new paper published in Nature Climate Change today recommends. (2020-07-28)

High blood pressure during and after exercise may be markers for disease later in life
Higher blood pressure during exercise and delayed blood pressure recovery after exercise are associated with a higher risk of hypertension, preclinical and clinical cardiovascular disease and death among middle-aged to older adults. (2020-05-20)

AAN updates recommendation on closure of common heart defect after stroke
New guidance from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) concludes that closure of a common heart defect called a patent foramen ovale (PFO) may be recommended for some people who have had a stroke. The updated practice advisory is published in the April 29, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-04-29)

Early high school start times adversely affect attendance
A new study finds that earlier high school start times can have significant adverse consequences for students, including increased rates of tardiness and absenteeism. (2020-04-27)

'Breastfeeding gap' exists among Mexican-origin women living in Texas
Mexican women born and educated in Mexico who now live in Texas breastfeed longer than those born and educated in the United States. That's the finding from new research from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) at The University of Texas at Austin, which points to a 'breastfeeding gap' among some Mexican-origin women living in Texas. (2020-03-18)

Shift workers at risk for heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes
Working nights disrupts individuals' circadian rhythm, the body's internal clock responsible for neural and hormonal signaling. When the circadian rhythm is desynchronized from the sleep/wake cycle, it causes a cascade of hormonal changes that lead to metabolic disorders and the development multiple chronic conditions. Kulkarni recommends several measures to prevent serious health issues associated with shift work. (2020-02-03)

Reducing aluminium intake can minimize potential health risks
Consumers can take up aluminium compounds from various sources, such as food, cosmetic products like aluminium containing antiperspirants and toothpaste, food contact materials like uncoated aluminium menu or baking trays and drugs. For the first time, the BfR has now estimated the total aluminium intake for different age groups (infants, children and adolescents as well as adults) and carried out a risk assessment. (2020-01-10)

Brassica crops best for crop rotation and soil health in potato production systems
Crop rotation is vital to any crop production system. Rotating crops maintains crop productivity and soil health by replenishing organic matter, nutrients, soil structure, and other properties while also improving water management and reducing erosion. Rotating crops also reduces the buildup of soilborne pathogens and diseases. (2020-01-03)

Women with single dose of HPV vaccine gain similar protection as multiple doses
A new study revealed that one dose of the HPV vaccine may prevent infection from the potential cancer-causing virus, according to research published in JAMA Network Open from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2019-12-27)

Child care centers rarely require flu vaccination for children or their caregivers
Influenza can be especially dangerous for children, who are at greater risk for serious complications from the illness, including hospitalization and even death. Yet child care centers in the US rarely require children or the adults who care for them to be vaccinated against flu, according to a new study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. (2019-12-12)

Importance of breastfeeding in preventing diabetes reaffirmed in rat study
New research published today in The Journal of Physiology shows that breastfeeding is crucial in preventing diabetes. (2019-12-11)

MMR vaccine-eligible children traveling abroad fail to get vaccinated
Nearly 60 percent of eligible young travelers did not receive MMR vaccine during pretravel consultation. (2019-12-09)

Legumes boost heart health, according to new review study
Consuming beans, lentils, peas, and other legumes reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and high blood pressure, according to a review published in Advances in Nutrition. (2019-11-20)

Stress, plastic additives in late pregnancy raise risk of premature birth
Women exposed simultaneously to stress and plastic additives late in pregnancy are at increased risk for premature birth, according to a study by Rutgers and other institutions. (2019-11-14)

American Academy of Pediatrics looks at use of nonnutritive sweeteners by children
Nonnutritive or artificial sweeteners are a growing part of US diets, now consumed by at least one in four children. A new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement offers a summary of the existing data around nonnutritive sweeteners and recommends future research into how they affect children's weight, taste preferences, the risk for diabetes, and long-term safety. (2019-10-28)

AAP recommends greater access to surgical treatments for severe obesity
Recognizing that severe obesity is a serious and worsening public health crisis in children and adolescents, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is calling for greater access to metabolic and bariatric surgery, one of the few strategies that has been shown to be effective in treating the most severe forms of the chronic disease. (2019-10-27)

Experts in high-risk pregnancy respond to the published results of the PROLONG trial
The Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine issues guidance for obstetric care providers who care for pregnant patients who have previously experienced a preterm birth. (2019-10-25)

UTSA study warns of security gaps in smart light bulbs
Smart bulbs are expected to be a popular purchase this holiday season. But could lighting your home open up your personal information to hackers? Now researchers at UTSA have conducted a review of the security holes that exist in popular smart-light brands. According to the analysis, the next prime target could be that smart bulb that shoppers buy this coming holiday season. (2019-10-23)

More evidence linking common bladder medication to a vision-threatening eye condition
A drug widely prescribed for a bladder condition for decades, now appears to be toxic to the retina, the light sensing tissue at the back of the eye that allows us to see. (2019-10-12)

How nasty Toxoplasma parasite damages the human eye
An international study used human retinal cells to demonstrate how the Toxoplasma parasite creates a characteristic eye lesion that can help doctors diagnose the infection. (2019-09-29)

Study: Many Tennesseans are misinformed about tornado protection
More people die during tornadoes in the Southeast than anywhere else in the United States. And still, a lot of people have misconceptions about their risk of being impacted by tornadoes, according to a new study published in PLOS One by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-09-20)

Stopping progression of tissue injury after button battery ingestion
Button battery injuries in children have been increasingly severe -- resulting in devastating injuries and even death. Button batteries damage esophageal tissue through isothermic hydrolysis reactions, resulting in alkaline caustic injury, which leads to tissue necrosis. Prompt removal of the battery is critical to minimizing damage. However, when children swallow a button battery, the injury can progress even after it is removed. (2019-09-05)

AAN issues guideline on vaccines and multiple sclerosis
Can a person with multiple sclerosis (MS) get regular vaccines? According to a new guideline, the answer is yes. The guideline, developed by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), recommends that people with MS receive recommended vaccinations, including yearly flu shots. The guideline is published in the Aug. 28, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the AAN. (2019-08-28)

USPSTF recommendation on screening, genetic counseling and testing for BRCA-related cancer
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is broadening its recommendation on screening for potentially harmful mutations of the breast cancer susceptibility BRCA1/2 genes, which are associated with increased risk of certain cancers. The USPSTF now recommends primary care clinicians assess risk in women with a personal or family history of breast, ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal (tissue lining the abdominal cavity) cancer or those who have an ancestry associated with BRCA1/2 mutations. (2019-08-20)

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