Current Autism Spectrum Disorders News and Events | Page 25

Current Autism Spectrum Disorders News and Events, Autism Spectrum Disorders News Articles.
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Autism linked to egg cells' difficulty creating large proteins
New work from Carnegie's Ethan Greenblatt and Allan Spradling reveals that the genetic factors underlying fragile X syndrome, and potentially from other autism-related disorders, stem from defects in the cell's ability to create unusually large protein structures. They found that mutations in the gene Fmr1 create problems in the and the reproductive system. They can lead to the most-common form of inherited autism, fragile X syndrome, as well as to premature ovarian failure. (2018-08-16)

Mizzou program significantly reduces delay in autism diagnosis
A new study on the effectiveness of ECHO Autism shows that the program significantly reduces diagnostic wait times for young children at highest risk for autism and saved families an average of 172.7 miles in travel for diagnosis. (2018-08-15)

Students' social skills flourish best in groups with similar skill levels
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that children who need assistance improving their social skills might benefit more when grouped with peers who have similar social skill levels, rather than with peers who have a similar disability or disorder. (2018-08-15)

Immune cells in the brain have surprising influence on sexual behavior
Immune cells usually ignored by neuroscientists appear to play an important role in determining whether an animal's sexual behavior will be more typical of a male or female. (2018-08-14)

Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have almost double the rate of repeat pregnancy
Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have nearly double the rate of having another baby within a year of delivering compared to women without such disabilities, according to a new study published in CMAJ. (2018-08-13)

Study finds Tdap vaccination for pregnant women does not increase risk of autism
A Kaiser Permanente study of more than 80,000 children born over a 4-year period showed that the prenatal Tdap vaccination (tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis) was not associated with increased risk of autism spectrum disorder in children. The study was published today in Pediatrics. (2018-08-13)

Potential biomarker for autism
A study of young children with autism spectrum disorder published in JNeurosci reveals altered brain waves compared to typically developing children during a motor control task. The non-invasive neuroimaging technique used in this study could be employed to detect autism symptoms as early as infancy. (2018-08-13)

Findings from Marshall University researcher reveal insights into brain circuitry
New research from a team led by Marshall University scientist W. Christopher Risher, Ph.D., reveals novel molecular insights into how multiple cell types drive the formation and maturation of brain circuits. (2018-08-10)

Synapses of the reward system at stake in autistic disorders
Autism spectrum disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders, one of the main characteristics of which is impaired social communication. But what happens in patients' brains that disrupts their social skills? According to scientists from UNIGE and UNIBAS, a malfunction of the synaptic activity of neurons present in the reward system seems to be at stake. They established a link between a genetic mutation, a disturbance of the synapses and an alteration of social interactions. (2018-08-09)

How ions gather water molecules around them
Charged particles in aqueous solutions are always surrounded by a shell of water molecules. However, much is still unknown about the nature of this so-called hydration shell. Using terahertz spectroscopy, chemists from Bochum have gained new insights into how an ion affects the water molecules in its environment. (2018-08-09)

Targeting a brain mechanism could treat aggression
EPFL neuroscientists have identified a brain mechanism that is linked to aggression and violent behavior, potentially forming the basis for treating aggression in several psychiatric disorders. (2018-08-09)

Study examines for risk factors associated with initiation of substance use
Not all individuals who initiate use of a substance such as nicotine, alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine eventually develop a substance use disorder, indicating that the risk factors for substance use and for substance use disorder (SUD) differ to some extent. A new study has evaluated the overlap in risk factors for substance initiation and SUD, which may be useful for developing interventions to reduce both initiation and SUD. The findings are published in The American Journal on Addictions. (2018-08-08)

Stanford scientists tie specific brain circuit to sociability in mice
Social behavior in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder normalized when investigators triggered the release of a specific signaling substance, serotonin, in a single part of the animals' brains, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-08-08)

Potential indicator for the early detection of dementias
Researchers at the University of Basel have discovered a factor that could support the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. This cytokine is induced by cellular stress reactions after disturbances of the mitochondria, the 'cell's power plants,' as neuropathologists write in the journal Cell Reports. (2018-08-07)

Google Glass helps kids with autism read facial expressions, Stanford study finds
Children with autism were able to improve their social skills by using a smartphone app paired with Google Glass to help them understand the emotions conveyed in people's facial expressions, according to a pilot study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-08-02)

Map of a billion brain links reveals clues about how we think
Scientists have created an elaborate map of more than a billion brain cell connections, helping to shed light on how memories are formed and recalled. (2018-08-02)

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome more likely to have a child with autism
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by a team at Cambridge University's Autism Research Centre. The research is published today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. (2018-08-01)

Real or crocodile tears? Psychopaths may not know the difference
New research has found people with high levels of psychopathic traits have difficulty telling when someone is genuinely afraid or upset, based on people's facial expressions. (2018-08-01)

The heritability of anxiety
Individual differences in the connectivity between regions of the brain involved in fear and anxiety are heritable, according to a large study of hundreds of related monkeys published in JNeurosci. The research provides new insights into the risk and development of anxiety disorders. (2018-07-30)

Zebrafish interactions offer help in studying social behavior disorders
University of Oregon scientists have identified brain cells vital to how zebrafish socialize. When the neurons are disabled, their orientation to one another breaks down in ways similar to socialization problems seen in humans with autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. (2018-07-26)

Estimated prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders is nearly 1 in 8 among children in India
Almost one in eight children aged 2-9 years living in India may have at least one neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), according to prevalence estimates published this week in PLOS Medicine. (2018-07-24)

Paying parents to read to their children boosts literacy skills
Researchers have found a surprising way to help boost the skills of children with language impairment: Pay their parents to read to them. (2018-07-23)

Autism risk determined by health of mom's gut, UVA research reveals
The mother's microbiome, the collection of microscopic organisms that live inside us, determines the risk of autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders in her offspring, new research from the UVA School of Medicine shows. The work raises the possibility we could prevent autism by altering expectant moms' diets. (2018-07-18)

CALET succeeds in direct measurements of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV
An international team of researchers, led by Professor Shoji Torii of Waseda University, succeeded in the direct, high-precision measurements of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV, based on observations with the Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET). Observations by CALET are expected to reveal the mysteries of cosmic-rays and nature of dark matter in the future. (2018-07-18)

Study: Protein found to be key component in irregularly excited brain cells
In a new study in mice, researchers have identified a key protein involved in the irregular brain cell activity seen in autism spectrum disorders and epilepsy. The protein, p53, is well-known in cancer biology as a tumor suppressor. (2018-07-17)

A constellation of symptoms presages first definitive signs of multiple sclerosis
Canadian researchers document the health problems that precede a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. (2018-07-16)

Emotional robot lets you feel how it's 'feeling'
Cornell University researchers have developed a prototype of a robot that can express 'emotions' through changes in its outer surface. The robot's skin covers a grid of texture units whose shapes change based on the robot's feelings. (2018-07-16)

AASM publishes clinical practice guideline on use of actigraphy for sleep disorders
Actigraphy can be a useful clinical tool for the evaluation of adult and pediatric patients with suspected sleep disorders, including circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, according to a clinical practice guideline from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). (2018-07-16)

Plastic chemical linked to smaller prefrontal cortex, reduced cognitive ability in rats
Adult rats that had been exposed before birth and during nursing to a mixture of chemicals found in a wide range of consumer products have a smaller medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and perform worse on an attention-switching task than rats not exposed to the chemicals early in life. These findings, published in JNeurosci, demonstrate a long-term influence of endocrine-disrupting compounds on brain development. (2018-07-16)

Key social reward circuit in the brain impaired in kids with autism, Stanford study shows
Children with autism have structural and functional abnormalities in the brain circuit that normally makes social interaction feel rewarding, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-07-16)

Fragile X: New drug strategy corrects behavior/biochemical measures in mouse model
Research in mice shows that a pharmacological strategy can alleviate multiple behavioral and cellular deficiencies in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. (2018-07-13)

One step closer to finding a cure for brain diseases
Korean researchers identified a mechanism for signaling brain nerve cells through excitatory synaptic binding proteins. The finding provides important clues to understanding the principles of synaptic nerve transmission and thus can be used to analyze the fundamental causes of brain diseases and treat them. (2018-07-12)

Autism spectrum disorder linked to shape of brain's cerebellum
Structural differences in the cerebellum may be linked to some aspects of autism spectrum disorder, according to a neuroimaging study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). (2018-07-11)

Why are neuron axons long and spindly? Study shows they're optimizing signaling efficiency
A team of bioengineers at UC San Diego has answered a question that has long puzzled neuroscientists, and may hold a key to better understanding the complexities of neurological disorders: Why are neuron axons designed the way they are? The answer--that they're designed to balance the speed that information flows into the neuron relative to the time it takes the neuron to process that information--seems intuitive, but has never been quantified until now. (2018-07-11)

As brain extracts meaning from vision, study tracks progression of processing
Study finds that six brain regions shared more responsibility than thought for how the brain moves from raw perception to determining the categorical meaning of what's seen. (2018-07-10)

Vaginal microbiome may influence stress levels of offspring
Exposing newborn mice to vaginal microbes from stressed female mice may transfer the effects of stress to the newborns, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. These changes resemble those seen specifically in the male offspring of moms that were stressed during pregnancy. (2018-07-09)

Study finds new brain pathway for escaping predators
How the zebrafish brain perceives and reacts to predators has been determined by researchers at the University of Queensland. School of Biomedical Sciences Associate Professor Ethan Scott said the processing of visual threats by the brain represented a really interesting puzzle in neuroscience. (2018-07-05)

Neuronal 'barcodes' shape complex networks in the brain
The brain is an enormously complex organ. Understanding how billions of brain cells succeed in making precise connections is a major challenge for neuroscientists. Professor Joris de Wit and his team (VIB-KU Leuven) have unraveled a molecular code that determines the shape, location and function of connections between individual neurons. These findings could help us better understand brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. (2018-07-05)

SATB1 vital for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells
Osaka University-led researchers revealed that expression of SATB1 was involved in both differences in HSC self-renewal ability and differences in the ability of HSCs to differentiate into lymphocytic lineages. (2018-07-04)

Prenatal exposure to folic acid fortification of foods may reduce mental illness risk
A Massachusetts General Hospital study finds that fortifying grain-based foods with folic acid -- instituted to prevent neural tube defects in infants -- may also reduce the incidence of severe mental illnesses like schizophrenia that initially appear in young adulthood. (2018-07-03)

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