Current Autoimmunity News and Events

Current Autoimmunity News and Events, Autoimmunity News Articles.
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A subtle change in the DNA may predispose to polyneuropathy after gut infection
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified a novel genetic variant associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). By analyzing the DNA sequence of patients with the disease, the researchers identified two novel variants of the ganglioside-binding protein Siglec-10 accumulated in the patients. They found that one of these variants impairs the function of the protein, predisposing carriers to the development of GBS. This study improves our understanding of the pathophysiology of GBS. (2021-01-07)

University of Miami leads groundbreaking trial for COVID-19 treatment
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers led a unique and groundbreaking randomized controlled trial showing umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell infusions safely reduce risk of death and quicken time to recovery for the severest COVID-19 patients, according to results published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine in January 2021. (2021-01-05)

Vaccination against tuberculosis can reduce the spread of COVID-19 and ease its course
St Petersburg University scientists have analysed about 100 academic papers and statistics on the incidence of COVID-19 in different countries of the world. Analysis of these data showed that the spread of the new coronavirus infection occurs more slowly where there is a large percentage of people vaccinated against tuberculosis with the BCG vaccine. Moreover, this vaccination itself, given in early childhood, changes the immune system in such a way that the new coronavirus disease course tends to be less severe. (2020-12-03)

Metabolic signaling plays a crucial role in regulating specialized T cells
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have identified how metabolic signaling pathways influence key immune cells with implications for treating autoimmune disorders and cancer. (2020-11-17)

Seven different 'disease forms' identified in mild COVID-19
In a study a team of MedUni Vienna scientists led by immunologist Winfried F. Pickl and allergologist Rudolf Valenta showed that there are seven ''forms of disease'' in COVID-19 with mild disease course and that the disease leaves behind significant changes in the immune system, even after 10 weeks. These findings could play a significant role in the treatment of patients and in the development of a potent vaccine. (2020-11-02)

Autoantibody order, timing predict genetically at-risk children most likely to get T1D
New findings from The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study in the U.S. and Europe show that detailed information about the order, timing and type of autoantibodies appearing after the first autoantibody can significantly improve prediction of which children are most likely to progress to type 1 diabetes more rapidly. The analysis, led by the USF Health Informatics Institute, could help diagnose T1D earlier and offers the opportunity to prevent diabetic ketoacidosis and its serious complications. (2020-10-29)

New population of immune cells could play a role in multiple sclerosis
Researchers uncover defining features of a subset of T-cells that may drive autoimmunity in MS, and could prove to be a new target for therapy. (2020-10-23)

Regulatory T cells could lead to new immunotherapies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis
In a new University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers have discovered how regulatory T cells (Treg) are instrumental in limiting the damage caused to the spinal cord in diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). (2020-09-21)

Salmonella biofilm protein causes autoimmune responses -- Possible link with Alzheimer's
Scientists from the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and Temple University (Philadelphia, US) have demonstrated that a Salmonella biofilm protein can cause autoimmune responses and arthritis in animals. (2020-07-09)

The protein that stands between us and autoimmunity
Researchers from Osaka University identified the epigenetic proteins Tet2 and Tet3 as key regulators of B cell function. They showed that these proteins suppress B cell function and conversely, that Tet2/Tet3 knockout mice develop a mild form of systemic lupus erythematosus due to hyperactivation of T cells. These findings could help develop a novel treatment for autoimmune diseases. (2020-07-02)

Long-term culture of human pancreatic slices reveals regeneration of beta cells
Scientists from the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have developed a method allowing for the long-term culture of 'pancreatic slices' to study the regeneration of the human pancreas in real time. (2020-07-01)

Birmingham scientists 're-train' immune system to prevent attack of healthy cells
The body's immune system can be re-wired to prevent it from recognising its own proteins which, when attacked by the body, can cause autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, a significant new study by UK scientists has found. (2020-06-09)

Researchers flag similarities between COVID-19 deaths and severe rheumatic illnesses
Rheumatologists at the University of Alberta are flagging similarities between the deaths of some COVID-19 patients and those with rheumatic illnesses, and are testing proven rheumatic treatments to see whether they help against the pandemic virus. (2020-05-27)

A 'switch' that turns autoimmunity drugs into powerful anti-cancer treatments
Scientists from the Antibody and Vaccine group at the University of Southampton have discovered a way to transform antibody drugs previously developed to treat autoimmunity into antibodies with powerful anti-cancer activity through a simple molecular 'switch'. (2020-05-21)

Fighting autoimmunity and cancer: The nutritional key
Scientists at the Department of Infection and Immunity of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) revealed a novel mechanism through which the immune system controls autoimmunity and cancer. In the special focus of the researchers were regulatory T cells -- a type of white blood cells that act as a brake on the immune system. (2020-05-06)

High ferritin levels may indicate severe COVID-19
Professor Yehuda Shoenfeld is Head of the Laboratory of the Mosaic of Autoimmunity at St Petersburg University and founder and Head of the Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases (Israel). During the Cradle of Virology online conference, he spoke about the correlation between the severity of COVID-19 symptoms and high levels of ferritin. It turns out that elevated ferritin concentrations are associated with an increased production of special signalling molecules, which can lead to complications and death. (2020-04-22)

Small rises in blood glucose trigger big changes in insulin-producing cells
This study provides a wealth of new data showing how beta cells behave at slightly raised levels of blood glucose -- still within the pre-diabetes range. The work provides major additional evidence of a 'glucose toxicity' effect that helps to drive the development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. (2020-04-21)

New research gives further evidence that autoimmunity plays a role in Parkinson's disease
A new study co-led by scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) adds increasing evidence that Parkinson's disease is partly an autoimmune disease. In fact, the researchers report that signs of autoimmunity can appear in Parkinson's disease patients years before their official diagnosis. (2020-04-20)

Is autoimmunity on the rise?
A study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology provides evidence that the prevalence of autoimmunity -- when the immune system goes awry and attacks the body itself -- has increased in the United States in recent years. (2020-04-08)

Autoimmunity may be rising in the United States
Autoimmunity, a condition in which the body's immune system reacts with components of its own cells, appears to be increasing in the United States, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. In a study published April 8 in Arthritis and Rheumatology, the researchers found that the prevalence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), the most common biomarker of autoimmunity, was significantly increasing in the United States overall and particularly in certain groups. (2020-04-08)

Autoimmunity-associated heart dilation tied to heart-failure risk in type 1 diabetes
In people with type 1 diabetes without known cardiovascular disease, the presence of autoantibodies against heart muscle proteins was associated with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging evidence of increased volume of the left ventricle (the heart's main pumping chamber), increased muscle mass, and reduced pumping function (ejection fraction), features that are associated with higher risk of failure in the general population (2020-04-06)

A protein that controls inflammation
A study by the research team of Prof. Geert van Loo (VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) has unraveled a critical molecular mechanism behind autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis. They discovered how the protein A20 prevents inflammation and autoimmunity, not through its enzymatic activities as has been proposed, but through a non-enzymatic mechanism. (2020-03-17)

Scientists discover new 'Jekyll and Hyde' immune cell
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have identified a rare, new cell in the immune system with 'Jekyll and Hyde properties.' These cells play a key protective role in immunity to infection but -- if unregulated -- also mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disorders. The findings should help us design more effective vaccines to prevent infections such as MRSA, and may also assist help us develop of new therapies for autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. (2020-02-27)

Sex-specific traits of the immune system explain men's susceptibility to obesity
Melbourne researchers have uncovered important differences between the male and female immune system which may explain why men are more susceptible to obesity and metabolism-related associated diseases, such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes. It has long been known that men are more likely than women to develop unhealthy obesity and related metabolic diseases, while women are more prone to certain autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. These findings suggested the male and female immune systems differ, but until now scientists weren't sure how. (2020-02-26)

Otago researchers shed light on 'arms race' between bacteria and viruses
University of Otago researchers have contributed to an international study which helps improve the understanding of bacteria and viruses. (2020-02-25)

Autoimmunity may explain why an important immune system is absent in many bacteria
New findings from University of Exeter researchers reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria. (2020-01-22)

Researchers investigate molecule, VISTA, which keeps immune system quiet against cancer
Researchers led by Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center are studying a valuable target in regulating the immune response in cancer and autoimmunity. VISTA is a tempering molecule that hinders T cells in the immune system from activating against self-antigens such as cancer cells. Their new publication describes how VISTA controls T-cell responses. (2020-01-16)

Type 1 Diabetes: New starting point to delay autoimmune response
Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent excessive immune reactions in healthy people. In the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes, this protection is not sufficiently effective. Researchers have now deciphered a mechanism that impairs Treg differentiation and stability. In the study, when they inhibited the molecule that triggers this mechanism, an increased number of functional Tregs were formed again and autoimmune activation was reduced. This may represent a new molecular target to delay or even prevent the development of type 1 diabetes. (2019-12-19)

Research adds new twist to fight against autoimmune diseases
Scientists describe in Nature Immunology an entirely new molecular process in mice that triggers T cell-driven inflammation and causes different auto-immune diseases. In a study published online Dec. 17, say their data have implications for Multiple Sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. It also will help efforts to find better treatments for autoimmune disease, still an urgent need in medicine. (2019-12-17)

Unexpected viral behavior linked to type 1 diabetes in high-risk children
New results from the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study show an association between prolonged enterovirus infection and development of autoimmunity to the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells that precedes type 1 diabetes. Conversely, adenovirus C infection seems to confer protection from autoimmunity. The international research suggests new therapeutic avenues for prevention in some children. (2019-12-02)

Cells control their dance of death
La Trobe University researchers have revealed for the first time how white blood cells control the final moments of their death, helping their own removal from the human body. (2019-11-12)

Penn uncovers dose of medication more likely to put patients with pemphigus into remission
Researchers from Penn compare a lymphoma-dose regimen of rituximab to a rheumatoid arthritis regimen for the treatment of pemphigus. (2019-11-11)

Circulating molecules in blood may be stepping stone for type 1 diabetes early prediction
Researchers from the Turku Bioscience Centre in Finland have found changes in molecules in the blood that might be new markers of type 1 diabetes. New findings may help understand the early pathogenesis of the disease. (2019-09-19)

Study examines gluten consumption in childhood, celiac disease risk in genetically at-risk kids
Consuming more gluten during the first five years of life was associated with increased risk of celiac disease and celiac disease autoimmunity (the presence of antibodies in the blood) among genetically predisposed children. It remains unclear whether the amount of gluten consumed can trigger celiac disease. This observational study included 6,605 children born between 2004 and 2010 in Finland, Germany, Sweden and the United States who had a genetic predisposition for celiac disease. (2019-08-13)

Autoimmunity and chair-side risk assessment of temporomandibular disorders
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), many oral and poster presentations centered around temporomandibular disorders, or TMD. (2019-06-21)

Salty diet reduces tumor growth by tackling immune cells
A study by an international research team led by Professor Markus Kleinewietfeld (VIB-UHasselt) shows that high salt intake inhibits tumor growth in mice. The effect seems to be due to a change in function of certain immune cells which play a critical role in cancer immunity. The further exploration of this finding might be beneficial for improving anti-cancer immunotherapies. (2019-06-05)

How stressed-out bacteria may trigger autoimmune response
Stressful life events most likely contribute to autoimmune diseases, but scientists don't have a deep understanding of the underlying chain of events. A study on mice published this week in mSystems suggests that the gut microbiota may play a significant role in that connection. Researchers found that the onset of stress caused changes in the intestinal bacteria that, in turn, stimulated the activity of immune cells in a way that increased the likelihood that the body would attack itself. (2019-05-14)

'Reporter islets' in the eye may predict autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes
Islets transplanted within the anterior chamber of the eye may be reliable reporters of the early onset of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes and help guide timely intervention to halt or delay its development, according to scientists from the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami. (2019-05-14)

Transplanted cells reveal early signs of type 1 diabetes
By the time type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most of the insulin-producing beta cells have already been destroyed. Now, using an innovative transplantation technique, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have been able to intervene to save the beta cells in mice by discovering early signs of the disease. The study is published in Diabetologia, the scientific journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). (2019-05-14)

Intestinal helminths boost fat burning: Japanese investigators show how
Intestinal infection with helminths -- a class of worm-like parasites -- prevented weight gain in laboratory mice on a high-fat diet. The helminths did so by boosting populations of bacteria that produce compounds that trigger increased energy consumption in the mice. (2019-04-08)

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