Current Automated Transfer Vehicle News and Events

Current Automated Transfer Vehicle News and Events, Automated Transfer Vehicle News Articles.
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Measuring hemoglobin levels with AI microscope, microfluidic chips
A complete blood count can help ascertain the health of a patient and typically includes an estimate of the hemoglobin concentration, which can indicate several conditions, including anemia, polycythemia, and pulmonary fibrosis. In AIP Advances, researchers describe a AI-powered imaging-based tool to estimate hemoglobin levels. The setup was developed in conjunction with a microfluidic chip and an AI-powered automated microscope that was designed for deriving the total as well as differential counts of blood cells. (2021-02-23)

Agile underwater glider could quietly survey the seas
Autonomous underwater vehicles have become versatile tools for exploring the seas. But they can be disruptive to the environment or have trouble traveling through confined spaces. Purdue University researchers are studying an alternative: highly maneuverable, low-cost underwater gliders that operate silently. (2021-02-23)

Artificial pancreas system upgraded with AI algorithm
POSTECH professor Sung-Min Park's research team is developing a fully automated glucose management system that goes beyond the limits. (2021-02-22)

Should Uber and Lyft be electrifying more vehicles?
Increases in air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions caused by ridesourcing impact human health and the environment--what happens when companies shoulder that cost? (2021-02-19)

How likely are consumers to adopt artificial intelligence for banking advice?
A new study published in Economic Inquiry is the first to assess the willingness of consumers to adopt advisory services in the banking sector that are based on artificial intelligence (AI). (2021-02-18)

High patient uptake for text message system monitoring opioid use in real-time
Among the orthopaedic surgery patients in a study using text messaging to monitor opioid use, 61 percent of their tablets were found to be left over (2021-02-17)

The effects of picking up primary school pupils on surrounding street's traffic
The objective of this study is to find out factors affecting the picking up of pupils at primary school by evaluating the typical primary schools in Hanoi city. (2021-02-16)

Army researchers expand study of ethics, artificial intelligence
The Army of the future will involve humans and autonomous machines working together to accomplish the mission. According to Army researchers, this vision will only succeed if artificial intelligence is perceived to be ethical. (2021-02-16)

Electricity source determines benefits of electrifying China's vehicles
Researchers have concluded air quality and public health benefits of EVs -- as well as their ability to reduce carbon emissions -- in China are dependent on the type of transport electrified and the composition of the electric grid. (2021-02-16)

Scientists identify how harmless gut bacteria "turn bad"
An international team of scientists has determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can easily pick up the genes required to evolve to cause a life-threatening infection. Their study, published in Nature Communications, warns that such infections not only affect the poultry industry but could also potentially cross over to infect humans. (2021-02-12)

Producing more sustainable hydrogen with composite polymer dots
Hydrogen for energy use can be extracted in an environmentally friendly way from water and sunlight, using photocatalytic composite polymer nanoparticles developed by researchers at Uppsala University. In laboratory tests, these 'polymer dots' showed promising performance and stability alike. The study has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2021-02-12)

Wafer-scale production of graphene-based photonic devices
Graphene Flagship researchers have devised a wafer-scale fabrication method that paves the way to the next generation of telecom and datacom devices. (2021-02-11)

Black carbon aerosols in Beijing become "slim"
Scientists observed evident decreases of black carbon aerosol (BC) loading in the atmosphere of urban Beijing since the implementation of China's Action Plan of Prevention and Control of Air Pollution in 2013. And the BC aerosols became ''slim'', appearing with smaller core sizes and less coatings. (2021-02-10)

Samara Polytech chemists simplify crystal structures
Samara Polytech scientists have developed new methods of modelling the crystal structure of chemical substances, which makes it possible to obtain additional information about the object under study, unknown in the initial experimental data, and also to find regularities determining its structure and properties. (2021-02-09)

A study presents an algorithm that automates electrocardiogram recordings
Artificial intelligence can help health personnel to diagnose heart diseases, as shown in a study published in Scientific Reports, by Guillermo Jiménez-Pérez and Oscar Camara, members of the PhySense group, and Alejandro Alcaine, a researcher at the University of San Jorge, Zaragoza. (2021-02-09)

How humans can build better teamwork with robots
Nancy Cooke is a cognitive psychologist and professor of human systems engineering at the Polytechnic School at Arizona State University (ASU). She explores how an artificial intelligence agent can contribute to team communications failure, and how to improve those interactions, in her discussion at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). (2021-02-08)

Mysterious organic scum boosts chemical reaction efficiency, may reduce chemical waste
Chemical manufacturers frequently use toxic solvents such as alcohols and benzene to make products like pharmaceuticals and plastics. Researchers are examining a previously overlooked and misunderstood phenomenon in the chemical reactions used to make these products. This discovery brings a new fundamental understanding of catalytic chemistry and a steppingstone to practical applications that could someday make chemical manufacturing less wasteful and more environmentally sound. (2021-02-04)

Automated imaging detects and tracks brain protein involved in Alzheimer's disease
Applying an automated method to brain images revealed where deposits of tau, a protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, first emerge in the cerebral cortex. Tau deposits in this tiny region were highly predictive of subsequent tau spread through the brain. (2021-02-02)

People blame a vehicle's automated system more than its driver when accidents happen
A new study in the journal Risk Analysis found that people are more likely to blame a vehicle's automation system and its manufacturer than its human driver when a crash occurs. (2021-02-02)

SLAS Technology special collection on AI in process automation available now
The February edition of SLAS Technology is a special collection of articles focused on 'Artificial Intelligence in Process Automation' by Guest Editor Cenk Ündey, Ph.D. (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA). (2021-02-01)

Automated AI algorithm uses routine imaging to predict cardiovascular risk
Investigators teamed up to develop and evaluate a deep learning system that may help change this. The system automatically measures coronary artery calcium from CT scans to help physicians and patients make more informed decisions about cardiovascular prevention. (2021-01-29)

Researchers use AI to help businesses understand Code of Federal Regs, other legal docs
Automated Legal Document Analytics (ALDA) provides tools for people, businesses, and other entities to understand highly complex, legally binding documents. Using AI, a UMBC team has now broken down the Code of Federal Regulations into components that are semantically linked for automated analysis. This means that any user can 'ask' the system whether something is allowable under the code, increasing their understanding of it and their access to opportunities that require CFR compliance. (2021-01-29)

Newly licensed autistic drivers crash less than other young drivers
A collaborative study found that compared with their non-autistic peers, young autistic drivers have lower rates of moving violations and license suspensions, as well as similar to lower crash rates. (2021-01-28)

First study to look at potency of maternal antibodies
In a new study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers will unveil findings that suggest that women who contract COVID-19 during pregnancy are able to make antibodies, but that transfer of these antibodies to their infants is less than expected. (2021-01-28)

Healthy lifespan analysis using nematodes
Researchers have developed an automated measurement system to assess healthy lifespan using nematodes. This system performs a mini-population analysis to classify specific populations of nematodes based on qualitative differences in lifespan. Since there are many similarities between the mechanisms that determine the lifespan of nematodes and humans, this system could make it easier to develop drugs and find foods that extend the healthy lifespan of humans. (2021-01-27)

Optical scanner design for adaptive driving beam systems can lead to safer night driving
In a recent study published in the Journal of Optical Microsystems, researchers from Japan have come up with an alternative to conventional adaptive driving beam systems: a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) optical scanner that relies on the piezoelectric effect of electrically induced mechanical vibrations. (2021-01-27)

How will seafarers fare once automated ships take over? Scientists predict the future
Researchers from the Korea Maritime and Ocean University show that automation in the shipping industry will lead to an overall increase in shore-based jobs. However, they warn that this will have to be complemented with concerted policy measures to provide the necessary technical training to job seekers and veteran seafarers who will need to adapt to the new technological paradigm. (2021-01-25)

Turbulence model could enhance rotorcraft, munitions performance
Design of Army aerial vehicles and weapon systems relies on the ability to predict aerodynamic behavior, often aided by advanced computer simulations of the flow of air over the body. High-fidelity simulations assist engineers in maximizing how much load a rotorcraft can lift or how far a missile can fly, but these simulations aren't cheap. A new turbulence model could change that (2021-01-25)

AI trained to read electric vehicle charging station reviews to find infrastructure gaps
Although electric vehicles that reduce greenhouse gas emissions attract many drivers, the lack of confidence in charging services deters others. Building a reliable network of charging stations is difficult in part because it's challenging to aggregate data from independent station operators. But now, researchers reporting January 22 in the journal Patterns have developed an AI that can analyze user reviews of these stations, allowing it to accurately identify places where there are insufficient or out-of-service stations. (2021-01-22)

Antibiotic resistance may spread even more easily than expected
Pathogenic bacteria in humans are developing resistance to antibiotics much faster than expected. Now, computational research at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows that one reason could be significant genetic transfer between bacteria in our ecosystems and to humans. This work has also led to new tools for resistance researchers. (2021-01-21)

Electron transfer discovery is a step toward viable grid-scale batteries
The way to boost electron transfer in grid-scale batteries is different than researchers had believed, a new study from the University of Michigan has shown. (2021-01-21)

How to get more electric cars on the road
MIT researchers reveal the kinds of infrastructure improvements that would make the biggest difference in increasing the number of electric cars on the road, a key step toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation. (2021-01-21)

Automated imaging reveals where TAU protein originates in the brain in Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have developed an automated method that can track the development of harmful clumps of TAU protein related to Alzheimer's disease in the brain, according to work involving 443 individuals. (2021-01-20)

"Smiling eyes" may not signify true happiness after all
A smile that lifts the cheeks and crinkles the eyes is thought by many to be truly genuine. But new research at Carnegie Mellon University casts doubt on whether this joyful facial expression necessarily tells others how a person really feels inside. (2021-01-20)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Lasers create miniature robots from bubbles (video)
Robots are widely used to build cars, paint airplanes and sew clothing in factories, but the assembly of microscopic components, such as those for biomedical applications, has not yet been automated. Lasers could be the solution. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have used lasers to create miniature robots from bubbles that lift, drop and manipulate small pieces into interconnected structures. (2021-01-20)

Inexpensive battery charges rapidly for electric vehicles, reduces range anxiety
Range anxiety, the fear of running out of power before being able to recharge an electric vehicle, may be a thing of the past, according to a team of Penn State engineers who are looking at lithium iron phosphate batteries that have a range of 250 miles with the ability to charge in 10 minutes. (2021-01-18)

New delivery method promises relief from antipsychotic medication's adverse side effects
A team of neuroscientists and engineers at McMaster University has created a nasal spray to deliver antipsychotic medication directly to the brain instead of having it pass through the body. (2021-01-15)

New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it
Gaining control of the flow of electrical current through atomically thin materials is important to potential future applications in photovoltaics or computing. Physicists in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered one way to locally add electrical charge to a graphene device. (2021-01-14)

Energy harvesting made possible with skin temperature
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a collaborative research team led by Dr. Seungjun Chung from the Soft Hybrid Materials Research Center and Professor Yongtaek Hong from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Seoul National University (SNU) developed flexible thermoelectric devices with high power generation performance by maximizing flexibility and heat transfer efficiency. The research team also presented a mass-production plan through an automated process including a printing process. (2021-01-13)

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