Current Avian Influenza News and Events

Current Avian Influenza News and Events, Avian Influenza News Articles.
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CDDEP report highlights tremendous burden from infectious diseases in SEAR countries
Washington, DC / New Delhi, India - Researchers at CDDEP, in collaboration with leading experts in the field, have produced the ''Infectious Diseases in the South-East Asia Region'' report, which examines cross-boundary challenges in communicable disease control in countries in the South-and South-East Asia region. The report emphasizes infectious diseases related to other sources of disease burden in the region and communicates overall trends in the health and economic burden they impose. (2021-02-23)

The Lancet Healthy Longevity: Study finds racial and ethnic disparities in flu vaccine uptake among people aged 65 and older in the USA
A new study published today in The Lancet Healthy Longevity journal has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccine among people aged 65 years and over in the USA. (2021-02-18)

Targeting Nsp1 protein could be a pathway for COVID-19 therapy
A study that identifies how a coronavirus protein called Nsp1 blocks the activity of genes that promote viral replication provides hope for new COVID-19 treatments. (2021-02-16)

Asthma may heighten flu risk and cause dangerous mutations
A subtype of asthma in adults may cause higher susceptibility to influenza and could result in dangerous flu mutations. University of Queensland-led animal studies have found that paucigranulocytic asthma (PGA) - a non-allergic form of the condition - allows the flu virus to flourish in greater numbers in sufferers. (2021-02-16)

Avian insights into human ciliopathies
Ciliopathies are genetic disorders caused by defects in the structure and function of cilia, and present a wide range of clinical symptoms, leading to conditions such as micrognathia (an underdeveloped lower jaw that can impair feeding and breathing). Researchers have now discovered that ciliopathic micrognathia in an animal model results from abnormal skeletal differentiation and remodelling. (2021-02-15)

Definitely not the flu: risk of death from COVID-19 3.5 times higher than from flu
A new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) found that the risk of death from COVID-19 was 3.5 times higher than from influenza. (2021-02-10)

Caution: 1918 influenza provides warning for potential future pandemic reemergence
New research from Michigan State University used health data from the initial 1918 influenza spike to provide insights to what ''pandemic reemergence'' may look like for our future. (2021-02-10)

Lessons from the flu season
Australian researchers have come up with two key recommendations from studies of the annual influenza season - one highlighting the benefits of antivirals in reducing repeat hospitalisation, and the other to watch for underlying cardiovascular disease. While the world focuses on the rising COVID-19 death toll, seasonal influenza continues to cause significant mortality and poses a significant economic burden every year. (2021-02-10)

History of vaccines offers lessons on COVID-19 for pregnant women
DALLAS - Feb. 8, 2021 - Pregnant women, who are at increased risk of preterm birth or pregnancy loss if they develop a severe case of COVID-19, need the best possible guidance on whether they should receive a COVID-19 vaccine, according to an article by two UT Southwestern obstetricians published today in JAMA. That guidance can take lessons from what is already known about other vaccines given during pregnancy. (2021-02-08)

1918 pandemic second wave had fatal consequences
In the event of a pandemic, delayed reactions and a decentralized approach by the authorities at the start of a follow-up wave can lead to longer-lasting, more severe and more fatal consequences, researchers from the universities of Zurich and Toronto have found. The interdisciplinary team compared the Spanish flu of 1918 and 1919 in the Canton of Bern with the coronavirus pandemic of 2020. (2021-02-08)

Study shows flu vaccine lessens COVID-19 symptoms in children
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that children who receive a seasonal flu shot are less likely to suffer symptoms from a COVID-19 infection. The finding comes from a review of more than 900 children diagnosed with COVID-19 in 2020. (2021-02-04)

Unusual 2019-2020 flu season linked to more transmissible strain
The 2019-2020 flu season in the U.S. was unusual in a number of ways. Cases picked up in August rather than the more typical fall and early winter months, and it hit children particularly hard. (2021-02-04)

Intranasal influenza vaccine spurs strong immune response in Phase 1 study
An experimental single-dose, intranasal influenza vaccine was safe and produced a durable immune response when tested in a Phase 1 study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The investigational vaccine, called Ad4-H5-VTN, is a recombinant, replicating adenovirus vaccine designed to spur antibodies to hemagglutinin, a protein found on the surface of influenza viruses that attaches to human cells. (2021-02-03)

COVID-19 increases mortality rate among pregnant women
The study followed 240 pregnant women between March and June 2020 and found that the COVID-19 mortality rate in the pregnant women was significantly higher when compared to the COVID-19 mortality rate in similarly aged individuals within Washington state. (2021-01-27)

Hospital worker flu shots could mean fewer deaths
Research shows that state laws promoting flu vaccinations for hospital workers can substantially reduce the number of influenza-related deaths. (2021-01-26)

Fighting respiratory virus outbreaks through 'nano-popcorn' sensor-based rapid detection
Respiratory diseases like influenza can spread rapidly and escalate to global health crises. Thus, to control them, simple yet sensitive detection techniques are needed. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a potential candidate but currently lacks reproducibility. To overcome this, researchers in Korea have now developed a novel SERS-based sensor that can effectively detect influenza A viral pathogens with high reproducibility. Through this improved method of detection, preventing future outbreaks of respiratory diseases can become easier. (2021-01-21)

Estrogen receptors in mom's placenta critical during viral infection
A team of Duke and Mt. Sinai researchers has found a mechanism that protects a fetus from harm when the mother's innate immune system responds to a viral infection. Inflammation that would harm the fetus is dampened by a cell-surface estrogen receptor called GPER1 that is especially abundant in the placenta and fetal tissues. (2021-01-21)

Age-based COVID-19 vaccine strategy that saves most lives prioritizes elderly, modeling shows
Vaccinating people over 60 is the most effective way to mitigate mortality from COVID-19, a new age-based modeling study suggests. (2021-01-21)

Model analyzes how viruses escape the immune system
MIT researchers have devised a way to computationally model viral escape, using models that were originally developed to model language. The model can predict which sections of viral surface proteins, including those of influenza, HIV, and SARS-CoV-2, are more likely to mutate in a way that allows the virus to evade the human immune system. It can also identify sections that are less likely to mutate, making them good targets for new vaccines. (2021-01-14)

Another common cold virus? Modeling SARS-CoV-2's progress through the ages
What is the endgame for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is causing worldwide devastation? If it becomes endemic -- circulating in the general population -- and most people are exposed in childhood, SARS-CoV-2 may join the ranks of mild cold-causing coronaviruses that currently circulate in humans, according to a model developed by Emory and Penn State scientists. (2021-01-12)

Early warning system fills in gaps in infectious disease surveillance
Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health developed an infectious disease early warning system that includes areas lacking health clinics participating in infectious disease surveillance. The approach compensates for existing gaps to support better observation and prediction of the spread of an outbreak, including to areas remaining without surveillance. (2021-01-11)

State laws promoting flu vaccination for hospital workers may help prevent deaths from flu and pneum
Research suggests that state laws promoting influenza vaccination for hospital workers can be effective in preventing deaths from pneumonia and influenza, particularly among the elderly. Findings from a quasi-experimental observational study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2021-01-04)

Research reveals compromised transfer of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies through placenta
Lower than expected levels of protective SARS-CoV-2 antibodies pass through the placenta from mothers who are infected in the third trimester with the virus that causes COVID-19. This low level of transfer from mother to fetus may be caused by altered attachments of carbohydrates to the SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies. (2020-12-23)

Pregnant women with COVID-19 pass no virus but fewer-than-expected antibodies to newborns
Pregnant women may be especially vulnerable to developing more severe cases of COVID-19, but little is known about their anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response or how it may affect their offspring. A new study provides new insights that could help improve care for these women and their newborns and emphasizes the need for pregnant women to be considered in vaccine rollout plans. (2020-12-22)

Study examines attitudes toward non-native birds
A new study from scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines public attitudes toward non-native bird species and whether people are willing to manage them to protect native cavity-nesting birds, such as Eastern Bluebirds and the American Kestrel. The findings are published in the Journal of Environmental Management. (2020-12-21)

Using wearable activity trackers to distinguish COVID-19 from flu
By analyzing Fitbit data and self-reported symptoms, researchers distinguished trends in heart rate, step count, and symptom duration between patients with flu and those with COVID-19. While both showed similar-looking spikes in resting heart rate and decreases in average step count, COVID-19 symptoms lasted longer and peaked later. The results appear December 12 in the journal Patterns. (2020-12-21)

The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: COVID-19 causes more severe disease than seasonal influenza, comparison of data from over 130,000 hospitalised patients confirms
Nearly twice as many people were admitted to hospital for COVID-19 at the height of the pandemic than were for influenza at the peak of the 2018/2019 flu season, a study of French national data published today in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal has found (COVID-19, 89,530 patients vs influenza, 45,819 patients). (2020-12-17)

New study links cadmium to more severe flu, pneumonia infections
High levels of cadmium, a chemical found in cigarettes and in contaminated vegetables, are associated with higher death rates in patients with influenza or pneumonia--and may increase the severity of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses, according to a new study. (2020-12-16)

The phantom chorus: birdsong boosts human well-being in protected areas
Although many studies have found that humans benefit from spending time in nature, few studies have explored why. Researchers hid speakers that played recorded songs from a diverse group of birds on two sections of trails in Colorado. Hikers who heard the bird songs reported a greater sense of well-being than those who didn't. The survey results showed that both the sounds themselves and people's perception of biodiversity can increase humans' feelings of well-being. (2020-12-15)

Point of Care testing can improve the detection and treatment of influenza
Southampton-led research has shown that implementing point-of-care testing in hospitals to diagnose influenza can lead to better treatment and faster recovery for patients. The researchers are now calling for routine use of these tests to become standard for patients admitted with acute respiratory symptoms during the influenza season. (2020-12-14)

Genes could be key to new COVID-19 treatments, study finds
Potential treatments for Covid-19 have been identified after the discovery of five genes associated with the most severe form of the disease. (2020-12-11)

Pre-existing flu immunity impacts antibody quality following infection and vaccination
New research by scientists at the University of Chicago suggests a person's antibody response to influenza viruses is dramatically shaped by their pre-existing immunity, and that the quality of this response differs in individuals who are vaccinated or naturally infected. Their results highlight the importance of receiving the annual flu vaccine to induce the most protective immune response. (2020-12-11)

Tasmanian devils may survive their own pandemic
Researchers have found strong evidence that a transmissible cancer that has decimated Tasmanian devil populations likely won't spell their doom. For the first time, a research team employed genomic tools of phylodynamics, typically used to track viruses, such as influenza and SARS-CoV-2 , to trace the Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease. The approach they pioneered has opened the door for application to other genetically complex pathogens. (2020-12-10)

Many older adults hospitalized with the flu face persistent functional decline
In a study of older adults admitted to the hospital with influenza and other acute respiratory illnesses during the 2011-2012 flu season, functional decline was common--and for some, this decline was persistent and catastrophic. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2020-12-09)

Scientists shed new light on how lung bacteria defend against pneumonia
New insight on how bacteria in the lungs protect against invading pathogens has been published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2020-12-08)

Mount Sinai researchers advance a universal influenza virus vaccine
A vaccine that induces immune responses to a wide spectrum of influenza virus strains and subtypes has produced strong and durable results in early-stage clinical trials in humans, Mount Sinai researchers have found. (2020-12-07)

Biological diversity evokes happiness
A high biodiversity in our vicinity is as important for life satisfaction as our income, scientists from Senckenberg, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), and Kiel University found. All across Europe, the individual enjoyment of life correlates with the number of surrounding bird species. An additional 10% of bird species therefore increases the Europeans' life satisfaction as much as a comparable increase in income. Nature conservation thus constitutes an investment in human well-being. (2020-12-04)

New study explains important cause of fatal influenza
It is largely unknown why influenza infections lead to an increased risk of bacterial pneumonia. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have now described important findings leading to so-called superinfections, which claim many lives around the world every year. The study is published in the journal PNAS, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and can also contribute to research on COVID-19. (2020-11-25)

New therapy for flu may help in fight against COVID-19
A new therapy for influenza virus infections that may also prove effective against many other pathogenic virus infections, including HIV and COVID-19, has been developed by Purdue University scientists. The Purdue team's approach uses a targeted therapy approach against the virus infections. (2020-11-24)

COVID-19: Air quality influences the pandemic
An interdisciplinary team from the University of Geneva and the ETH Z├╝rich spin-off Meteodat investigated possible interactions between acutely elevated levels of fine particulate matter and the virulence of the coronavirus disease. Their results suggest that high concentrations of particles less than 2.5 micrometers in size may modulate, or even amplify, the waves of SARS-CoV-2 contamination and explain in part the particular profile of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-24)

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