Current BPA News and Events

Current BPA News and Events, BPA News Articles.
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Prenatal BPA exposure may contribute to the male bias of autism spectrum disorder
Autism has a higher prevalence in males than females. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a common chemical found in plastics, our food, and even the human placenta. Higher prenatal exposure to BPA is thought to increase the risk of autism. Researchers have, for the first time, identified autism candidate genes that may be responsible for the sex-specific effects of BPA. (2021-01-19)

Screening for endocrine disruption in artificial zebrafish for long-term risk assessment
the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that the collaborative research team led by Dr. Young Jun Kim, leader of environmental safety at KIST Europe, and Professor Hyunjoon Kong from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tried to develop the long-term toxicity and risks by cultivating organoids that mimic the liver of zebrafish. (2020-12-11)

Environmental exposures affect therapeutic drugs
Humans are exposed to various environmental or dietary molecules that can attenuate or even increase the effect of therapeutic drugs. Studies on the industrial chemical bisphenol A and the phytoestrogen genistein, for example, have shown drug-exposome interactions. However, interactions between exposures and therapeutic agents have not been systematically investigated to date, conclude chemists Benedikt Warth and Manuel Pristner at the University of Vienna in a review article published in 'Trends in Pharmacological Sciences'. (2020-12-01)

Sensors get a laser shape up
Laser writing breathes life into high-performance sensing platforms. (2020-11-15)

Consumers who avoid products with harmful chemicals on the label have lower body burden
New research shows that paying close attention to what's in the products you buy can pay off. In a study led by Silent Spring Institute, researchers found that consumers who avoided products containing specific endocrine disruptors had significantly lower levels of the chemicals in their bodies. (2020-09-30)

Is exposure to BPA associated with long-term risk of death?
Whether exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical found in many consumer products, is associated with the long-term risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer or any cause among US adults was examined in this observational study. (2020-08-17)

Estimating bisphenol exposures in the Australian population
Once found in bottles, food containers, cash register receipts and electronics, bisphenol A (BPA) has been phased out of many products because of health concerns and government regulations. As a result, the production and use of BPA analogs, which are unregulated and poorly understood, have increased. Now, by analyzing urine samples and wastewater, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology how human exposure to bisphenols has changed over time in an Australian population. (2020-07-29)

Higher BPA levels linked to more asthma symptoms in children
Children in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore tended to have more asthma symptoms when levels of the synthetic chemical BPA (Bisphenol A) in their urine were elevated, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and School of Medicine. (2020-07-28)

Environmental contaminants alter gut microbiome, health
The microbes that inhabit our bodies are influenced by what we eat, drink, breathe and absorb through our skin, and most of us are chronically exposed to natural and human-made environmental contaminants. In a new paper, scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign review the research linking dozens of environmental chemicals to changes in the gut microbiome and associated health challenges. (2020-05-21)

Antioxidant reverses damage to fertility caused by exposure to bisphenol A
A study shows that administering coenzyme Q10 reverses damage done to germinative cells by BPA, a contaminant found in many kinds of plastic. (2020-05-06)

Chemicals used to replace BPA may lead to increased blood pressure
Common bisphenol A (BPA) substitutes can affect the developing fetus and cause hypertension in later life, suggests a rodent study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting. The research will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-30)

Think all BPA-free products are safe? Not so fast, scientists warn
Using 'BPA-free' plastic products could be as harmful to human health -- including a developing brain -- as those products that contain the controversial chemical, suggest scientists in a new study led by the University of Missouri and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-02-18)

Antioxidant reverses BPD-induced fertility damage in worms
Treatment with a naturally occurring antioxidant, CoQ10, restores many aspects of fertility in C. elegans worms following exposure to BPA Findings offer possible path toward undoing BPA-induced reproductive harms in people Although CoQ10 is available over the counter, it is not yet clear whether the compound could improve human fertility or do so safely (2020-02-06)

Special issue: Chemistry for Tomorrow's Earth
Through modern chemistry, we live better. However, as researchers continue to recognize the environmental and health risks associated with the mass production, use and disposal of complex synthetic molecules, a need for safer and more sustainable chemicals has become clear. (2020-01-23)

How to keep boron inside cells during radiotherapy: a novel approach to cancer treatment
Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a technique in which p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is transferred to cancer cells, and the boron in it undergoes nuclear fission reaction upon irradiation of thermal neutrons, releasing high energy particles that kill the cells. Scientists at Tokyo Tech, Kyoto University, and Innovation Center of NanoMedicine (iCONM) improved upon current BNCT by combining BPA with poly(vinyl alcohol) to produce the PVA-BPA complex, which has a longer cell retention time, enhancing the cancer-killing potential of BNCT. (2020-01-22)

BPA activates immune response in mice that passes down through generations
Some plastic food and beverage containers still contain bisphenol A (BPA), which can mimic the hormone estrogen. Although experts say that small amounts of BPA detected in foods are unlikely to cause problems, some people worry that constant low-level exposures could have health effects, especially for developing fetuses, infants and children. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research that in mice, BPA activates an immune response that persists for at least three generations. (2020-01-15)

BPA replacement hinders heart function, study reveals
BPA's counterpart replacement BPS can hinder heart function within minutes of a single exposure, according to a new University of Guelph study. (2020-01-09)

Study finds BPA levels in humans dramatically underestimated
Researchers have developed a more accurate method of measuring bispehnol A (BPA) levels in humans and found that exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical is far higher than previously assumed. The study provides the first evidence that the measurements relied upon by regulatory agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration, are flawed, underestimating exposure levels by as much as 44 times. (2019-12-05)

Babies in neonatal intensive care exposed to harmful chemicals, study finds
A multidisciplinary team of scientists from Granada, Spain, has detected bisphenol A (BPA) and parabens (PBs) in a wide range of plastic medical devices, fabrics, and personal care products commonly used in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), coming into direct contact with new-born babies Among the 50 items analysed were plastic syringes, feeding tubes and catheters, oxygen masks, endotracheal tubes, personal care products, dressings, clothing, nappy-changing mats and mattress protectors, among others (2019-11-28)

Bisphenol-a structural analogues may be less likely than BPA to disrupt heart rhythm
Some chemical alternatives to plastic bisphenol-a (BPA), which is still commonly used in medical settings such as operating rooms and intensive care units, may be less disruptive to heart electrical function than BPA, according to a pre-clinical study that explored how the structural analogues bisphenol-s (BPS) and bisphenol-f (BPF) interact with the chemical and electrical functions of heart cells. (2019-11-14)

Structural and biochemical studies clarify the methylation mechanism of anticodon in tRNA
Groups in Ehime University, Japan and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan have solved the crystal structure of the eukaryotic Trm7-TRm734 complex, which methylates the ribose at the first position of anticodon in tRNA. They have clarified the tRNA recognition mechanism of this complex and the functions of its subunits based on the crystal structure. This study was published in Nucleic Acids Research on Oct. 5, 2019. (2019-11-06)

KRICT comes in as a new leading player in the monopolized bio-polycarbonate market
The Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology(KRICT) developed a bio-polycarbonate which has been monopolized by Japan, and opened up the possibility of bio-polycarbonate commercialization. the Research Center for Bio-based Chemistry of KRICT utilized the plant-based components of isosorbide and nanocellulose to develop the bio-polycarbonate. (2019-10-28)

Chemicals in consumer products during early pregnancy related to lower IQ
Exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy to mixtures of suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in consumer products is related to lower IQ in children by age 7, according to a study by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Karlstad University, Sweden, published in Environment International in October. This study is among the first to look at prenatal suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical mixtures in relation to neurodevelopment. (2019-10-24)

Exposure to BPA in the womb linked to wheezing and poorer lung function in children
Pregnant women exposed to higher levels of the commonly used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) are more likely to have children who suffer with wheezing and poorer lung function, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. (2019-10-01)

Exposure to common chemicals in plastics linked to childhood obesity
Exposure to common chemicals in plastics and canned foods may play a role in childhood obesity, according to a study published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2019-07-25)

KIST uesed eco-friendly composite catalyst and ultrasound to remove pollutants from water
Developed eco-friendly, low-cost, and high-efficiency wastewater processing catalyst made from agricultural byproduct, and High efficiency and removal rate achieved through application of ultrasound stimulation, leading to high expectation for the development of an environmental hormone removal system. (2019-07-19)

Researchers push for better policies around toxic chemicals
Portland State University researchers contend that failures to protect human and environmental health from toxic chemicals result from flawed governance, and lay out a plan for improved policies. (2019-07-12)

Mouse study finds BPA exposure has transgenerational effects on gene linked to autism
Transgenerational bisphenol A (BPA) exposure may contribute to autism, according to a mouse study published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology. (2019-06-12)

Endocrine disruptors alter female reproduction throughout multiple generations
Endocrine disruptors, hormone-altering chemicals that are widespread in our environment, can shape the brain through four generations, altering offspring's maternal behavior, sexual development and reproduction, according to a new animal study. The results of this study will be presented Monday at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (2019-03-25)

BPA exposure during pregnancy can alter circadian rhythms
Exposure to the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy, even at levels lower than the regulated 'safe' human exposure level, can lead to changes in circadian rhythms, according to a mice study to be presented Monday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. The researchers report these changes may be a contributing factor in hyperactivity seen in BPA-exposed mice. (2019-03-24)

Can prenatal exposures to BPA impact ovarian function?
While previous studies have shown the adverse health effects of prenatal exposure to the industrial chemical bisphenol A (BPA), there is little evidence surrounding effects specifically on ovarian function. A new study now finds there is sufficient data to raise concerns regarding exposure and ovarian performance. (2019-02-13)

Exposure to chemicals during pregnancy is not associated with an increase in blood pressure
New study analyses the health impact of exposure to 21 non-persistent chemicals among pregnant women (2019-01-18)

Purchase receipts with easily erasable ink contain cancer-infertility inducing substances
An international research led by the UGR shows that 90 percent of store and supermarket receipts are made of thermal paper containing bisphenol A (BPA). (2019-01-15)

Study finds women and men are equally effective at wage-labor negotiations
First study to look at gender differences in trustworthiness and perceptions of benevolence in the context of hierarchical negotiations, such as wage-labor agreements, finds that women and men reach very similar negotiations outcomes in a neutral setting. The study is co-authored by Holona Ochs of Lehigh University and Andrew B. Whitford of University of Georgia. (2019-01-09)

New spheres trick, trap and terminate water contaminant
Rice University scientists enhance micron-sized titanium dioxide particles to trap and destroy BPA, a contaminant in water with health implications. The robust particles can be recharged for reuse in water remediation. (2018-10-05)

Connection between 'chalky teeth' in children and the uptake of Bisphenol A not likely
Medical associations are reporting increased occurrences of disturbed dental mineralization in children. The so-called 'chalky teeth' show discoloration and can be extremely sensitive to pain. Furthermore they tend to react sensitively to heat, cold and brushing. (2018-09-26)

BPA replacements in plastics cause reproductive problems in lab mice
Twenty years ago, researchers made the accidental discovery that BPA had leached out of plastic cages used to house female mice in the lab, causing an increase in chromosomally abnormal eggs. Now, the same team is back to report in the journal Current Biology on Sept. 13 that the array of alternative bisphenols now used to replace BPA in BPA-free bottles, cups, cages, and other items appear to come with similar problems for their mice. (2018-09-13)

WSU Researchers see new plastics causing reproductive woes of old plastics
Washington State University researchers have found that plastic products meant to replace the chemical bisphenol A, or BPA, are also causing genetic abnormalities in mice. The discovery is a déjà vu moment for Patricia Hunt, who 20 years ago linked abnormalities in egg chromosomes to BPA released by a harsh detergent used on her lab's mouse cages. This time, she saw reproductive defects in control animals housed in plastic cages made with BPA alternatives. (2018-09-13)

BPA exposure in US-approved levels may alter insulin response in non-diabetic adults
In a first study of its kind study, researchers have found that a common chemical consumers are exposed to several times a day may be altering insulin release. Results of the study, led by scientists at the University of Missouri, indicate that the Food and Drug Administration-approved 'safe' daily exposure amount of BPA may be enough to have implications for the development of Type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases. (2018-09-13)

Engineered sand zaps storm water pollutants
University of California, Berkeley, engineers have created a new way to remove contaminants from storm water, potentially addressing the needs of water-stressed communities that are searching for ways to tap the abundant and yet underused source of fresh drinking water. The mineral-coated sand reacts with and destroys organic pollutants, providing a way to help purify storm water percolating into underground aquifers, creating a safe and local reservoir of drinking water for parched communities. (2018-08-30)

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