Current Bacterial Infections News and Events | Page 25

Current Bacterial Infections News and Events, Bacterial Infections News Articles.
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Group A strep genome research expedites vaccine development efforts
The global search for a group A streptococcal (Strep A) vaccine has narrowed after researchers identified a common gene signature in almost all global Strep A strains by sequencing thousands of genomes in a project spanning 10 years and more than 20 countries. (2019-05-27)

Antibiotic ornament clasp
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasing health threat, making new antibiotics essential. German researchers have recently had a breakthrough: they discovered lugdunin in the human nose -- a new kind of cyclic peptide that comes from the bacterium Staphylococcus lugdunensis and has strong antimicrobial properties against Stahphylococcus aureus, among others. The researchers have been able to clarify the mode of action by synthesizing variants. As they explain in the journal Angewandte Chemie, proton transport across bacterial membranes is involved. (2019-05-27)

Antibiotics found in some of the world's rivers exceed 'safe' levels, global study finds
Concentrations of antibiotics found in some of the world's rivers exceed 'safe' levels by up to 300 times, the first ever global study has discovered. (2019-05-26)

Infection biology: Signs of selection in the stomach
Helicobacter pylori, a globally distributed gastric bacterium, is genetically highly adaptable. Microbiologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now characterized its population structure in individual patients, demonstrating an important role of antibiotics for its within-patient evolution. (2019-05-24)

Paper stickers to monitor pathogens are more effective than swabs
Using paper stickers to collect pathogens on surfaces where antisepsis is required, such as in food processing plants, is easier, and less expensive than swabbing, yet similarly sensitive. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2019-05-24)

A Finnish study proves the presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli
Researchers at Tampere University have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens. The research article has been published in the Journal of American Heart Association. (2019-05-23)

How bacteria acquire antibiotic resistance in the presence of antibiotics
A new study's disconcerting findings reveal how antibiotic resistance is able to spread between bacteria cells despite the presence of antibiotics that should prevent them from growing. (2019-05-23)

The extraordinary powers of bacteria visualized in real time
The global spread of antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and a priority for international microbiology research. In his paper to be published in the journal Science, Christian Lesterlin, Inserm researcher at Lyon's 'Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry' laboratory (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), and his team were able to film the process of antibiotic resistance acquisition in real time, discovering a key but unexpected player in its maintenance and spread within bacterial populations. (2019-05-23)

Civil War plant medicines blast drug-resistant bacteria in lab tests
A new study based on a mostly forgotten guide to medicinal plants, 'Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests,' focuses on three of the plants and shows they inhibit bacteria associated with wound infections. (2019-05-22)

Hospital-acquired infections may be lower in closed ICUs
Three hospital-acquired infections rates appear to be lower in patients admitted to a 'closed' intensive care unit, meaning that the ICU team has primary responsibility for the patient, rather than a primary care physician, (2019-05-22)

Natural environments favor 'good' bacteria
A new study has shown that restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote 'good' bacteria over 'bad' -- with potential benefits for human health. (2019-05-22)

Detecting bacteria in space
A new genomic approach provides a glimpse into the diverse bacterial ecosystem on the International Space Station. (2019-05-22)

A considerable percentage of deaths in HIV patients are due to cryptococcal infections
Cryptococcal meningitis causes about one in ten HIV-related deaths, according to a study of autopsies performed in Mozambique and Brazil and coordinated by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa'. (2019-05-21)

Study explains why some parasitic worms persist in people
A new study co-led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln may explain why some people struggle to expel parasitic worms that infect their intestines. The research suggests that the phenomenon is primarily a numbers game: Large groups of worms can overwhelm the immune system and kick-start a self-perpetuating cycle that nearly guarantees their survival, whereas smaller groups and lone worms cannot. (2019-05-21)

New investigational therapy shows promise for asthma patients in Phase 2 trial
In a Phase 2 trial, RTB101, which belongs to a class of drugs known as TORC1 inhibitors, was observed to be well tolerated and to reduce the incidence of respiratory tract infections in adults age 65 and older when given once daily for 16 weeks during winter cold and flu season. (2019-05-20)

New single vaccination approach to killer diseases
Scientists from the University of Adelaide's Research Centre for Infectious Diseases have developed a single vaccination approach to simultaneously combat influenza and pneumococcal infections, the world's most deadly respiratory diseases. (2019-05-20)

Staying in shape: How rod-shaped bacteria grow long, not wide
A team from Harvard University, Marine Biological Laboratory, and collaborators show how the rod-shaped bacteria Bacillus subtilis maintains its precise diameter while growing end to end. (2019-05-20)

Bacterial pneumonia predicts ongoing lung problems in infants with acute respiratory FAI
Bacterial pneumonia appears to be linked to ongoing breathing problems in previously healthy infants who were hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure. (2019-05-19)

Structural and functional mechanisms of a new class of bacterial sigma/anti-sigma factors revealed
Prof. FENG Yingang and his colleagues from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently revealed the structural and functional mechanism of the SigI/RsgI factors from C. thermocellum. (2019-05-19)

New findings could lead to improved vaccinations against sexually transmitted infections
In a study published today in the Nature Communications, researchers from King's College London have shown how skin vaccination can generate protective CD8 T-cells that are recruited to the genital tissues and could be used as a vaccination strategy for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). (2019-05-17)

Being sick in the morning can be different from being sick at night
In a review published May 17, 2019 in the journal Trends in Immunology, researchers discuss how time of day affects the severity of afflictions ranging from allergies to heart attacks. (2019-05-17)

IU researchers develop electric field-based dressing to help heal wound infections
Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have found a way to charge up the fight against bacterial infections using electricity. Scientists have developed a dressing that uses an electric field to disrupt biofilm infection in wounds. (2019-05-17)

Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?
Faster, more accurate tests for drug-resistant infections are hailed as a promising tool in the fight against antibiotic resistance, so much so that the US and Britain are offering millions in prize money for their development. A modeling study led by Duke University game theorist David McAdams shows that better tests could, in theory, change the game and put drug-resistant bacteria at a reproductive disadvantage relative to more easily-treated strains -- but with a caveat. (2019-05-16)

On the way to fighting staph infections with the body's immune system
Researchers have gained a greater understanding of the biology of staphylococcus skin infections in mice and how the mouse immune system mobilizes to fight them. A study appears this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) typically causes skin infections but can spread throughout the body to cause invasive infections such as sepsis, and possibly death. (2019-05-15)

User-friendly smartphone platform sounds out possible ear infections in children
Scientists have created a user-friendly smartphone-based platform that can quickly detect the presence of fluid in the middle ear -- a likely indicator of ear infections -- in children. (2019-05-15)

Symbionts as lifesavers
When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. An international team led by Matthias Horn from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna has tackled the question where do these pathogens come from using an important bacterial pathogen that causes lung disease. The results of their study have been published recently in the scientific journal mBio. (2019-05-14)

How stressed-out bacteria may trigger autoimmune response
Stressful life events most likely contribute to autoimmune diseases, but scientists don't have a deep understanding of the underlying chain of events. A study on mice published this week in mSystems suggests that the gut microbiota may play a significant role in that connection. Researchers found that the onset of stress caused changes in the intestinal bacteria that, in turn, stimulated the activity of immune cells in a way that increased the likelihood that the body would attack itself. (2019-05-14)

Newly identified bacteria-killing protein needs vitamin A to work
UT Southwestern researchers identified a previously unknown bacteria-killing protein on the epidermis that requires vitamin A to work. (2019-05-14)

Serious adverse outcomes from respiratory tract infection are rare but predictable
In routine primary care practice, serious adverse outcomes occur in only 1% of adult patients with lower respiratory tract infection, but such outcomes may be predicted with moderate accuracy. (2019-05-14)

Online intervention reduces mothers' intentions to visit doctor for respiratory tract infection
Visits to the doctor for a respiratory tract infection can lead to unnecessary antibiotic prescribing, but an online intervention with real-time information on locally circulating viruses may reduce mothers' intentions to visit their primary care doctor. (2019-05-14)

Like a lot of things, women's gut microbiomes appear to mature earlier than men's
A recent study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego State University and the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology found that the age and sex of an individual strongly influences the bacterial diversity of the gut microbiome. (2019-05-14)

Princeton scientists bioengineer a cellular speedometer
Princeton researchers have discovered that Pseudomonas bacteria can detect the speed (shear rate) of flow regardless of the force. By linking the flow-detecting gene to one responsible for illumination, they have bioengineered a real-time visual speedometer: The faster the flow, the brighter the glow. (2019-05-13)

Study details bacteria's role in recurrent urinary tract infections
A new finding by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that several species of bacteria reside in bladder tissue of postmenopausal women who experience recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs). The results, published online April 17 in the Journal of Molecular Biology, represent the first systematic analysis of biopsies from patients in this population. (2019-05-13)

Study sheds new light on urinary tract infections in postmenopausal women
A UT Southwestern study suggests why urinary tract infections (UTIs) have such a high recurrence rate in postmenopausal women -- several species of bacteria can invade the bladder walls. (2019-05-10)

Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive
A study led by Indiana University researchers reports the first known evidence of bacteria stealing genetic material from their own worst enemy, bacteriophages, and transforming it to survive. (2019-05-09)

Identifying therapeutic targets in sepsis' cellular videogame
Exciting new research has defined the chain of molecular events that goes awry in sepsis, opening up opportunities for new treatments to fight the condition that affects more than a million Americans each year and kills up to a third of them. (2019-05-08)

Phage therapy treats patient with drug-resistant bacterial infection
Scientists have used an experimental therapy that relies on bacteria-infecting viruses collected, in part, through HHMI's SEA-PHAGES program to fight a Mycobacterium infection in a 15-year-old girl. (2019-05-08)

In mice, fast-acting compounds accelerate treatment of tropical parasitic worms
Two compounds, from among 300,000 candidates screened, kill parasite-supporting bacteria after a single dose in mouse models of filarial diseases -- one of the biggest contributors to disability and poverty in the developing world. (2019-05-08)

New approach to drug discovery could lead to personalized treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders
Researchers have developed a method that could drastically accelerate the search for new drugs to treat mental health disorders such as schizophrenia. (2019-05-08)

Research brief: Surface protein editing in bacteria
UMN research delves into an unknown cell circuit in bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics. (2019-05-07)

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