Current Bacterial News and Events

Current Bacterial News and Events, Bacterial News Articles.
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Toxins from one bacterial species contribute to genetic diversity of others
A toxin produced by bacteria as a defence mechanism causes mutations in target bacteria that could help them survive. (2021-02-23)

Biological therapy has proved a suitable alternative to antibiotics
Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a biological substitute for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in the future could serve as an alternative for the traditional ''chemical'' antibiotic therapy. Dr. Freund: ''Advances in molecular medicine enable us to develop new tools to rout microbes, which can also solve the problem of drug-resistant germs''. This groundbreaking study has been published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications. (2021-02-22)

CUHK physicists discover new route to active matter self-organisation
An international team led by Professor Yilin Wu, Associate Professor of the Department of Physics at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has made a novel conceptual advance in the field of active matter science. The team discovered a new route in which the self-organisation of active fluids in space and time can be controlled by a single material property called viscoelasticity. (2021-02-20)

How bacteria hunt bacteria
The research team led by Dr. Christine Kaimer from the Microbial Biology department at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has taken a close look at predatory bacteria, which feed on other bacteria. Through microscopic examinations and protein analyses, they characterized the strategies used by the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus: It combines several mechanisms to kill structurally different prey bacteria, and also works in groups where necessary. (2021-02-16)

Rebuilding soil microbiomes in high-tunnel agricultural systems focus of study
The presence of high salt and nitrogen concentrations in high- tunnel soils may make it more challenging to rebuild a healthy soil microbiome following a soil-clearing event, according to microbial ecologists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. (2021-02-11)

Pooping out miracles: scientists reveal mechanism behind fecal microbiota transplantation
In a study published in Gastroenterology - Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, in collaboration with Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, report the intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of patients with recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (rCDI). This comprehensive analysis reveals the bacteria and phages involved in pathogenesis in rCDI, and their remarkable pathways important for the recovery of intestinal flora function. (2021-02-10)

Gulls, sentinels of bacteria in the environment
Gulls are one of the main wild birds that act as reservoirs of Campylobacter and Salmonella, two most relevant intestinal antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing gastroenteritis in humans. Therefore, according to an article published in the journal Science of the Total Environment seagulls could act as sentinels of the antibiotic pressure in the environment. (2021-02-10)

How the 3-D structure of eye-lens proteins is formed
Chemical bonds within the eye-lens protein gamma-B crystallin hold the protein together and are therefore important for the function of the protein within the lens. Contrary to previous assumptions, some of these bonds, called disulphide bridges, are already formed simultaneously with the synthesis of the protein in the cell. This is what scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics and the French Institute de Biologie Structurale in Grenoble have discovered. (2021-02-10)

A novel approach to determine how carcinogenic bacteria find their targets
The gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize the stomachs of the majority of the world's population. Although most people may never experience major complications due to the pathogen, H. pylori infections increase the risk of certain types of gastric cancer, as well as other illnesses such as peptic ulcers and gastritis. (2021-02-10)

Phages can anticipate bacteria's location and destroy them before they cause an infection
A novel strategy has the potential of becoming a game changer in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria that live in hard-to-reach places. (2021-02-09)

Toxin-antitoxin function fuels antibiotic-resistance research
Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are now known to negatively control plasmid replication, according to Thomas Wood, Biotechnology Endowed Chair and professor of chemical engineering in the Penn State College of Engineering. (2021-02-01)

Lactobacillus manipulates bile acids to create favorable gut environment
Probiotic Lactobacillus bacteria use enzymes situationally to manipulate bile acids and promote their own survival in the gut. (2021-02-01)

By changing their shape, some bacteria can grow more resilient to antibiotics
New research led by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Physics Shiladitya Banerjee demonstrates how certain types of bacteria can adapt to long-term exposure to antibiotics by changing their shape. (2021-01-29)

Neonatal antibiotic use associated with reduced growth in boys
Exposure to antibiotics in the first few weeks of life is associated with reduced weight and height in boys up to the age of six, but not girls, reports a paper in Nature Communications. The study, led by Prof. Omry Koren, of Bar-Ilan University, together with Prof. Samuli Rautava, of the University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, suggests that this effect may be due to changes in the development of the gut microbiome. (2021-01-26)

Iron-carrying extracellular vesicles are key to respiratory viral-bacterial co-infection
The vesicles associate with bacterial cells and supply them with essential nutrients, promoting the growth of expansive bacterial communities. (2021-01-26)

Antibiotic resistance may spread even more easily than expected
Pathogenic bacteria in humans are developing resistance to antibiotics much faster than expected. Now, computational research at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows that one reason could be significant genetic transfer between bacteria in our ecosystems and to humans. This work has also led to new tools for resistance researchers. (2021-01-21)

Novel effector biology research provides insights into devastating citrus greening disease
Ma and her colleagues at the University of California and the University of Florida used molecular plant pathology approaches to dissect the mechanisms of the ongoing tug-of-war between the citrus host and the bacterial pathogen that causes citrus greening disease. (2021-01-21)

Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then ''wake up''. (2021-01-20)

Message in a bottle: Info-rich bubbles respond to antibiotics
In a new study, Luis H. Cisneros and his colleagues describe the effects of antibiotics on membrane vesicles, demonstrating that such drugs actively modify the properties of vesicle transport. Under the influence of antibiotics, MVs were produced and released by bacteria in greater abundance and traveled faster and further from their origin. The work sheds new light on these important information-carrying entities, implicated in many cellular communication processes, including antibiotic resistance. (2021-01-20)

Esophageal cancer patients show abundance of oral pathogens
DNA from various oral bacterial pathogens has been found in tumors from esophageal cancer patients. Researchers led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) examined bacterial pathogens in plaque and saliva from esophageal cancer patients, determining that a prevalence of three species in particular, along with alcohol consumption, is associated with a high risk of esophageal cancer. Screening of oral pathogens could therefore be used for early disease detection. (2021-01-14)

Bacteria carried by mosquitos may protect them against pesticides
Mosquitoes are transmitters of several diseases and pesticides are used to control their numbers in many countries. New study finds Wolbachia - a bacteria commonly found in insects - appears to protect them against these pesticides. (2021-01-13)

Monash University leads breakthrough against antibiotic-resistance
New research published today has discovered how to revert antibiotic-resistance in one of the most dangerous superbugs. (2021-01-12)

Discovery pinpoints new therapeutic target for atopic dermatitis
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a key mechanism underlying bacterial skin colonisation in atopic dermatitis, which affects millions around the globe. By identifying a major mechanism through which Staphylococcus aureus binds to the skin of patients with AD the team has opened the possibility of targeting this pathway as a therapeutic option in AD. (2021-01-11)

Where antibiotic resistance comes from
By comparing thousands of bacterial genomes, scientists in Gothenburg, Sweden have traced back the evolutionary history of antibiotic resistance genes. In almost all cases where an origin could be determined, the gene started to spread from bacteria that, themselves, can cause disease. (2021-01-07)

New bacterial culture methods could result in the discovery of new species
A new microbial study explored the bacterial diversity of the Tabernas Desert located in the south-eastern Spain. Using simple tweaks of the traditional bacterial culture methods, the researchers isolated more than 250 bacterial strains of which 80 could be possible new bacteria species. (2021-01-05)

Severe sepsis predicted by common protein
A sugar-binding protein could fuel terrible inflammation and worsen sepsis, a disease that kills more than 270,000 people every year in the US alone, reports a team of researchers led by immunologists at UConn Health. (2021-01-04)

Bacteriophage has important role in agriculture and aquaculture
Crop plants and animals can be infected by bacterial pathogens that reduce yield, cause food wastage, and carry human pathogens that spread disease on consumption. Bacteriophage can play an important role in microbial control (2021-01-04)

Scientists turned toxic pesticide into treatment against antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Russian scientists from Kaliningrad and St. Petersburg have synthesized nitrogen-containing cyclic compounds that differ only in the relative position of side substituents. They are analogs of pesticides which are toxic and carcinogenic to humans, but the modifications allowed turning them into a powerful weapon against bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. (2020-12-29)

Groups of bacteria can work together to better protect crops and improve their growth
Certain bacteria, known as plant-growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), can improve plant health or protect them from pathogens and are used commercially to help crops. To further improve agricultural yields, it is helpful to identify factors that can improve PGPB behavior. (2020-12-28)

Wistar reports new class of antibiotics active against a wide range of bacteria
Wistar Institute scientists have discovered a new class of compounds that uniquely combine direct antibiotic killing of pan drug-resistant bacterial pathogens with a simultaneous rapid immune response for combatting antimicrobial resistance (AMR). These finding were published today in Nature. (2020-12-23)

With COVID exacerbating superbug threat, researchers ID new weapon
Researchers have discovered a compound capable of pushing through barriers used by Gram-negative bacteria to resist antibiotics, damaging the bugs and preventing them from spreading. (2020-12-23)

The incredible, variable bacteria living in your mouth
In a study published in Genome Biology researchers led by Harvard University examined the human oral microbiome and discovered tremendous variability in bacterial subpopulations living in certain areas of the mouth. In many cases, the team was able to identify a handful of genes that might explain a particular bacterial group's habitat specificity. (2020-12-18)

Optogenetic method can reveal how gut microbes affect longevity
Optogenetics offers a direct way to manipulate gut bacterial metabolism in a temporally, quantitatively and spatially controlled manner and enhance host fitness. (2020-12-17)

An atlas of S. pneumoniae and host gene expression during colonization and disease
The bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx and can cause pneumonia. Then, it can spread to the bloodstream and cause organ damage. To understand how this pathogen adapts to different locations in the body, and also how the host responds to the microbe, researchers have measured bacterial and host gene expression at five different sites in a mouse model -- the nasopharynx, lungs, blood, heart and kidneys -- using three genetically different strains of S. pneumoniae. (2020-12-16)

Chemists from RUDN University synthesized chitin-based antibiotics
?hemists from RUDN University discovered previously unknown derivatives of chitin, a biopolymer that forms the exoskeletons of insects and carapaces of crayfish and other arthropods. The new compounds and their nanoparticles have antibacterial properties and are able to catalyze chemical reactions. (2020-12-14)

Industrial waste is reused to produce alternatives to plastic
Researchers at São Paulo State University reused bacterial cellulose scraps usually thrown away by manufacturers of wound dressings to make strong biodegradable film for food packaging (2020-12-14)

Salt-tolerant bacteria with an appetite for sludge make biodegradable plastics
The United States generates seven million tons of sewage sludge annually, enough to fill 2,500 Olympic-sized swimming pools. While a portion of this waste is repurposed for manure and other land applications, a substantial amount is still disposed of in landfills. In a new study, Texas A&M University researchers have uncovered an efficient way to use leftover sludge to make biodegradable plastics. (2020-12-14)

Gut microbiota plays a role in brain function and mood regulation
Depression is a mental disorder that affects more than 264 million people of all ages worldwide. Understanding its mechanisms is vital for the development of effective therapeutic strategies. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm and the CNRS recently conducted a study showing that an imbalance in the gut bacterial community can cause a reduction in some metabolites, resulting in depressive-like behaviors. These findings, which show that a healthy gut microbiota contributes to normal brain function, were published in Nature Communications on December 11, 2020. (2020-12-11)

Newly discovered toxin-antitoxin system abundant in one-cell organisms
Bacteria are always hungry, according to Thomas Wood, Biotechnology Endowed Chair and professor of chemical engineering in the Penn State College of Engineering. If you gave a single bacterium all the food it wanted, it would obtain the mass of the Earth in about two days. (2020-12-11)

Rutgers reports first instance of COVID-19 triggering recurrent Guillain-Barré Syndrome
Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have reported the first instance of COVID-19 triggering a recurrence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome - a rare disorder where the body's immune system attacks nerves and can lead to respiratory failure and death. (2020-12-08)

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