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Current Bacterium News and Events, Bacterium News Articles.
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The atomic makeup of M. pneumoniae's 'nap' structure glides into view
Using X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, an international team of scientists unravel the atomic structure of the proteins P1 and P40/P90 which make up the ''Nap'' structure - a protein complex that the bacterium M. pneumoniae uses to attach and move around human cells to cause pneumonia. This will allow us to better understand the ''Nap'' structure and develop medicine and vaccines that stop the bacterium from infecting humans. (2020-10-14)

Bacterial cellulose degradation system could give boost to biofuels production
Researchers have uncovered details of how a certain type of bacteria breaks down cellulose--a finding that could help reduce the cost and environmental impact of the use of biomass, including biofuel production. The bacteria's cellulose degradation system is in some way different from how a fungus is already widely used in industry, including to soften up denim to make stone-washed jeans. (2020-10-08)

A red future for improving crop production?
Researchers have found a way to engineer more efficient versions of the plant enzyme Rubisco by using a red-algae-like Rubisco from a bacterium. For 50 years scientists have strived to boost the activity of Rubisco, a promising target to increase crop production, as it controls how much and how fast plants fix carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into sugars and energy during photosynthesis. (2020-09-28)

Secondary variant of Photorhabdus luminescens interacts with plant roots
One of the basic approaches in organic farming is to use organisms beneficial to the system to combat pests. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is one such beneficial organism. Yet, it seems this is not the only ability of Photorhabdus that can be exploited for organic plant cultivation. A German research team has discovered additional properties that could significantly extend its range of uses. (2020-09-24)

Researchers uncover tools used by predatory bacteria to escape unharmed from prey cell
Predatory bacteria, capable of invading and consuming harmful bugs such as E .coli and Salmonella, use a unique tool to help them escape the cell they have invaded without harming themselves, according to a new study. (2020-09-23)

Princeton researchers discover how worms pass down knowledge through the generations
Princeton researchers Rachel Kaletsky, Rebecca Moore, Coleen Murphy and colleagues have discovered that the microscopic roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans recognizes a small RNA made by a pathogenic bacterium, and uses that RNA to convey learned avoidance of the bacterium to offspring. Their work appears in the Sept. 9, 2020 issue of Nature. (2020-09-17)

Skin creams, make-up and shampoos should be free from Pluralibacter
The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has assessed the health risks associated with cosmetic products contaminated with P. gergoviae. Only externally applied products - such as skin creams, make-up or shampoos - were considered. (2020-09-10)

The Art of War: how bacteria gather intel for guiding their CRISPR-Cas systems
Researchers from the Severinov Lab at Skoltech have looked at how a poorly studied type of CRISPR-Cas defense system from a bacterium living at extremely high temperature gets to know its enemy by selecting snippets of bacteriophage's genetic information for a genetic 'database' it uses to ward off subsequent infections. Understanding of this mechanism opens new ways for further genomic manipulation of both the bacterial host and its virus. (2020-09-08)

Microbial genetics: A protean pathogen
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is linked to increased risk of stomach cancer, and is genetically highly variable. A new study by researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich explores the role played by this diversity in the early phase of infection in adult humans. (2020-09-02)

Newly identified gene grants tomatoes resistance to bacterial speck disease
Bacterial speck disease, which reduces both fruit yield and quality, has been a growing problem in tomatoes over the last five years. Because the culpable bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, prefers a cool and wet climate, crops in places such as New York State have been particularly susceptible. Researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute have uncovered the first known gene to impart resistance to a particular strain of the bacterium that causes speck disease. (2020-09-02)

How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut. Thanks to two different binding modes, they can withstand the shear forces in the body. Scientists of the University of Basel and ETH Zurich published their results in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-08-28)

Tag team gut bacteria worsen symptoms of multiple sclerosis
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) have discovered that a particular combination of microorganisms in the gut can worsen symptoms in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. The study published in the scientific journal Nature shows that two specific gut bacteria enhance the activity of immune cells that attack the body's own brain and spinal cord. (2020-08-26)

Microscopic deformation of a neutron star inferred from a distance of 4500 light-years
Gravitational waves, which are ripples in spacetime, have recently provided a new window to the universe. But continuous gravitational waves, for example from a slightly deformed and spinning neutron star, a star which is incredibly dense, have so far not been detected. A recent research work by Prof. Sudip Bhattacharyya has inferred continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star and has estimated the stellar microscopic deformation from a distance of about 4500 light-years. (2020-08-20)

Influence of vitamin D supplementation on a baby's gut microbiome
New research from the CHILD Cohort Study has shed light on the influence of vitamin D supplementation on a baby's developing gut microbiome. The study, published in the journal Gut Microbes, found that vitamin D supplementation is associated with compositional changes in a baby's microbiome -- notably a lower abundance of the bacteria Megamonas -- at three months of age. (2020-08-18)

World film premiere: Watch cell infected by tuberculosis die
Norwegian researchers have managed to show exactly how the tuberculosis bacterium kills its host cell by filming the process in detail for the first time. Every year, 1.5 million people die of TB. (2020-08-17)

Ultra-low voltage proven effective at killing bacteria, study finds
Research into the antimicrobial properties of ultra-low voltage electricity demonstrates that the power creates holes in the bacteria's outer membrane allowing two-way leakage and ultimately killing the cell. (2020-08-17)

Secretion of sugar polymers modulates multicellularity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus
Research by INRS (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique) Professor Salim Timo Islam has revealed that multicellular physiology in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus--a bacterium that can actively reorganize its community according to the environment in which it is found--is modulated by the secretion of two natural sugar polymers in separate zones of a swarm. Results from their research, done in collaboration with an international team, have been published in the journal PLOS Biology. (2020-08-12)

New tools in the fight against lethal citrus disease
Scientists are closer to gaining the upper hand on Huanglongbing, a disease that has wiped out citrus orchards across the globe. New models of the bacterium linked to the disease reveal control methods that were previously unavailable. (2020-08-10)

Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
A test designed by UCLA researchers can pinpoint which people with gonorrhea will respond successfully to the inexpensive oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which had previously been sidelined over concerns the bacterium that causes the infection was becoming resistant to it. (2020-08-07)

Oldest enzyme in cellular respiration isolated
Researchers from Goethe University have found what is perhaps the oldest enzyme in cellular respiration. They have been able to isolate the extremely fragile 'Rnf' protein complex from the heat-loving bacterium Thermotoga maritima. In fact, the genes that encode for the enzyme were already discovered. However, the researchers have now succeeded for the first time in isolating the enzyme and thus in proving that it really is formed by bacteria and used for energy production. (2020-08-07)

Children's National Hospital case report sounds the alarm for antibiotic resistance
A recent meningitis case at Children's National Hospital raises serious concerns about antibiotic resistance in the common bacterium that caused it, researchers from the hospital write in a case report. Their findings, published online August 3 in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society, could change laboratory and clinical practice across the US and potentially around the globe (2020-08-03)

Cold-sensitive staphylococci reveal a weakness
A team from the University of Geneva has identified a new mechanism involved in the membrane synthesis of Staphylococcus aureus. When disrupted, this mechanism makes the pathogen sensitive to cold. The discovery of this physiological process could contribute to the fight against this pathogen that is difficult to treat due to its resistance to antibiotics (2020-08-03)

How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that the bacterium C. perfringens modulates the structure of its biofilm at different temperatures by regulating the expression of the novel extracellular protein BsaA. They showed the number of BsaA-producing cells decreases when the temperature increases from 25°C to 37°C, and BsaA-producing cells cover non-BsaA-producing cells to provide tolerance to external stresses. These findings help us understand how bacteria adapt to their environment to survive. (2020-08-03)

The enemy within: Safeguarding against the spread of intracellular bacteria
Melbourne researchers have revealed the multiple, intertwined cell death systems that prevent the spread of the 'intracellular' bacterium Salmonella, an important cause of typhoid fever which kills more than 100,000 people annually. (2020-07-30)

Metal-breathing bacteria could transform electronics, biosensors, and more
When the Shewanella oneidensis bacterium ''breathes'' in certain metal and sulfur compounds anaerobically, the way an aerobic organism would process oxygen, it produces materials that could be used to enhance electronics, electrochemical energy storage, and drug-delivery devices. The ability of this bacterium to produce molybdenum disulfide -- a material that is able to transfer electrons easily, like graphene -- is the focus of research published in Biointerphases by a team of engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. (2020-07-28)

Battling harmful algae blooms
In two separate studies, the University of Delaware's Kathryn Coyne is looking at why one species of algae has some strains that can cause fish kills and others that are non-toxic, while examining an algicidal bacterium found in Delaware's Inland Bays that could provide an environmentally-friendly approach to combatting algae blooms. (2020-07-23)

Virginia Tech researchers discover that mouth bacterium may cause colon cancer to spread
Virginia Tech researchers have discovered that one of these common bacteria can leave the mouth and potentially cause existing cancer cells in other parts of the body to spread. (2020-07-21)

Lesion of doom -- how a parasitic bacterium induces blood vessel formation to cause lesions
A research team from Fujita Health University, Japan, has found that bacteria of the genus Bartonella release a protein--which they have named BafA--that stimulates the production of new blood vessels that support bacterial lesions. This discovery may help scientists develop new methods for diagnosing and treating these infections. (2020-07-16)

Cystic fibrosis: why so many respiratory complications?
Cystic fibrosis, one of the most common genetic diseases in Switzerland, causes severe respiratory and digestive disorders. Despite considerable therapeutic advances, this disease still reduces life expectancy, in particular due to life-threatening respiratory infections. Scientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have discovered the reason for this large number of lung infections: a protein, Vav3. (2020-07-13)

Antibiotic resistance and the need for personalized treatments
Scientists have discovered that the microbiota of each individual determines the maintenance of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the gut: whereas in some individuals resistant bacteria are quickly eliminated, in others they are not. The study now published in Nature Ecology and Evolution highlights the need to implement more personalized therapies and brings new perspectives to the paradigm of the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the gut. (2020-07-13)

Spider silk made by photosynthetic bacteria
A research team in Japan reported that they succeeded in producing the spider silk -- ultra-lightweight, though, biodegradable and biocompatible material -- using photosynthetic bacteria. This study will open a new era in which bio-factories stably output the bulk of spider silk. (2020-07-08)

How good gut bacteria help reduce the risk for heart disease
Scientists have discovered that one of the good bacteria found in the human gut has a benefit that has remained unrecognized until now: the potential to reduce the risk for heart disease. (2020-07-08)

Anaplasmosis bacterium tinkers with tick's gene expression to spread to new hosts
For the first time, scientists have shown that the bacterium that causes the tick-borne disease anaplasmosis interferes with tick gene expression for its survival inside cells and to spread to a new vertebrate host. Girish Neelakanta of Old Dominion University and colleagues report these findings in a study published July 2nd in PLOS Genetics. (2020-07-02)

New strategy emerges for vaccine against methicillin-resistant staphylococcal aureus
Experiments in mice have shown early success in vaccinating them against potentially deadly bacterial infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal aureus, or MRSA, the strain resistant to most drug treatments. (2020-06-30)

Study shows antibiotic resistance genes persist in E. coli through "genetic capitalism"
A new study analyzes the genomes of 29,255 E. coli strains collected between 1884 and 2018 to examine the evolution of 409 different genes that enable the bacterium to resist various antibiotics. The researchers examined whether the genes that confer antibiotic resistance, once acquired, tended to unusually accumulate -- a phenomenon known as ''genetic capitalism'' -- or disappear because they are unused, through a normal evolutionary process known as ''stabilizing selection.'' Recently, genetic capitalism is found common. (2020-06-29)

Microbiome confers resistance to cholera
Many parts of the world are in the midst of a deadly pandemic of cholera, an extreme form of watery diarrhea. UC Riverside scientists have discovered specific gut bacteria make some people resistant to it -- a finding that could save lives. (2020-06-29)

Function-based sequencing technique permits analysis of just a single bacteria cell
A new function-based sequencing technique using optical tweezers and taking advantage of the properties of gravity is letting researchers analyze bacteria cells one by one. The study, conducted by researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, was published in Small on June 9, 2020. (2020-06-26)

Dangerous tick-borne bacterium extremely rare in New Jersey
There's some good news in New Jersey about a potentially deadly tick-borne bacterium. Rutgers researchers examined more than 3,000 ticks in the Garden State and found only one carrying Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever. But cases of tick-borne spotted fevers have increased east of the Mississippi River, and more research is needed to understand why, according to a study in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (2020-06-25)

Entry point for curbing the evolution of antibiotic resistance discovered
Medications work better when bacteria have a genetic defect / publication in 'Nature Communications'. (2020-06-24)

Click... Resistant bacteria caught in the act!
As humanity fights against the coronavirus, the battle against antibiotic resistant bacteria continues. Scientists at UCLouvain have succeeded in capturing unique images of protein soldiers that help bacteria resist drugs. This discovery is published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology. The image recordings will make it possible to develop new attacks on bacteria and thus produce more effective antibiotics. (2020-06-22)

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