Current Bad Reputation News and Events

Current Bad Reputation News and Events, Bad Reputation News Articles.
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Study of auto recalls shows carmakers delay announcements until they 'hide in the herd'
Automotive recalls are occurring at record levels, but seem to be announced after inexplicable delays. A research study of 48 years of auto recalls announced in the United States finds carmakers frequently wait to make their announcements until after a competitor issues a recall - even if it is unrelated to similar defects. (2021-02-22)

Social tool tracks brand reputation in real time and over the long term
An international team of researchers has developed a tool for assessing brand reputation in real time and over time. In a demonstration that looked at leading brands, the researchers found that changes in a given brand's stock shares reflected real-time changes in the brand's reputation. (2021-02-18)

Once bitten, twice shy: the neurology of why one bad curry could put us off for life
A negative experience with food usually leaves us unable to stomach the thought of eating that particular dish again. Using sugar-loving snails as models, researchers at the University of Sussex believe these bad experiences could be causing a switch in our brains, which impacts our future eating habits. (2021-02-11)

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. UCPH researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or bruised apples. (2021-02-08)

Mast cells: Sentinels and high-speed messengers of the immune defense
A team of scientists at the Institute for Molecular and Clinical Immunology at the Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg unravels a crucial mechanism of cell-cell-communication during the defense against pathogens. (2021-02-04)

Family's our focus during pandemic, study finds
More fully appreciating family and engaging in more conflict are among the heightened experiences during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new UC Riverside study. (2021-01-29)

Abusive bosses 'fake nice' instead of 'make nice'
Rather than take steps to genuinely repair damage caused by their abusive behavior, such as offering sincere apologies, many of the bosses in this study were more concerned about repairing their social images. (2021-01-22)

'Aging well' greatly affected by hopes and fears for later life, OSU study finds
If you believe you are capable of becoming the healthy, engaged person you want to be in old age, you are much more likely to experience that outcome, a recent Oregon State University study shows. (2021-01-21)

Study finds bilateral agreements help developing economies spur foreign investment
Developing economies suffer from a paradox: they don't receive investment flows from developed economies because they lack stability and high-quality financial and lawmaking institutions, but they can't develop those institutions without foreign funds. A new study finds that bilateral investment treaties, known as BITs, can help developing economies overcome this paradox, but only as long as those countries can demonstrate a commitment to property and contract rights. (2021-01-21)

Online courses reinforce inequalities
With the global student community taking online courses, a study (UNIGE) reveals that online courses deepen inequalities between gifted and less gifted students by 5%. The results of the study, which was based on data collected in 2016-2017 prior to the anti-Covid lockdown initiatives. They indicate that this learning gap between different student profiles is mainly due to their behaviour and motivation. (2021-01-19)

The meat of the matter: Environmental dissemination of beef cattle agrochemicals
A recent Point of Reference article, ''The meat of the matter: Environmental dissemination of beef cattle agrochemicals,'' published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, points at synthetic chemical cocktails being emitted from cattle feed yards into the environment and how they can impact our ecosystem and our health. (2021-01-13)

Wives bore the brunt of child care during the shutdown
Traditional gendered patterns of child care persisted during the COVID-19 shutdown, with more than a third of couples relying on women to provide most or all of it. (2021-01-12)

Ignoring CDC guidelines leads to fear, anger among employees
Companies not following the recommended safety protocols set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic could have a significant impact on employee trust, loyalty and overall commitment, according to a new study. (2020-12-16)

New approach can improve COVID-19 predictions worldwide
Methods currently used around the world for predicting the development of COVID-19 and other pandemics fail to report precisely on the best and worst case scenarios. Newly developed prediction method for epidemics, published in Nature Physics, solve this problem. (2020-12-15)

'Boss' genes could save human hearts - and the reef
UQ researchers have revealed rare decision-making genes in cells, which control how cells develop and respond to stress caused by disease or their environment. Researchers hope that in the future, they may be able to block a cell's bad decisions to prevent disease. (2020-12-13)

Negative reviews boost sales
Aleksei Smirnov, Assistant Professor, HSE University Faculty of Economic Sciences, and Egor Starkov, Assistant Professor, University of Copenhagen, have constructed a mathematical model that explains why it is advantageous for sellers not to delete negative reviews of their products. A study detailing this conclusion has been accepted for publication in The American Economic Journal: Microeconomics. (2020-12-11)

Carrots are healthy, but active enzyme unlocks full benefits
Carrots are a good source of beta-carotene, which is a precursor of vitamin A. But to get the full health benefits of this superfood, you need an active enzyme to produce this vitamin. (2020-12-11)

Studying trust in autonomous products
Stanford engineers investigated how people's moods might affect their trust of autonomous products, such as smart speakers. They uncovered a complicated relationship. (2020-12-08)

Academic dishonesty: Fear and justifications
Why do some students cheat by looking over someone's shoulder, furtively searching for test answers on the internet, using cheat sheets during exams or paying others to complete their coursework? How do they rationalise their behaviour to continue to think of themselves as decent people? A study conducted by the HSE Centre for Sociology of Higher Education offers some answers. (2020-12-02)

Children more willing to punish if the wrongdoer is 'taught a lesson'
Many children are willing to make personal sacrifices to punish wrongdoers -- and even more so if they believe punishment will teach the transgressor a lesson, a new Yale study published Nov. 23, 2020 in the journal Nature Human Behaviour shows. (2020-11-23)

Sociologists dispel the 'bad apple' excuse for racialized policing
According to a study by University of Miami sociologists published in the American Sociological Association's Contexts magazine, almost one of five police officers exhibit high levels of implicit, or unconscious, pro-white/anti-Black bias, and roughly one of eight officers exhibit high levels of explicit, or conscious, pro-white bias. (2020-11-11)

The transformation of a pair: How electrons supertransport current in 'bad metals'
The repulsive forces between the electrons in bad metals are much stronger than in low-temperature superconductors: so how do particles with the same charge overcome these forces and manage to pair-up and to transport current as it happens in ''traditional'' superconductors? According to a new study, in these materials the electrons would transform into new ''objects'', with an unprecedented character that would allow them to superconduct the current. (2020-11-11)

Cockroach mating habits and developmental features help uncover insect evolution
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba examined the mating habits of an often-overlooked cockroach family, Nocticolidae, to provide clues about insect evolution. Although the studied cockroaches displayed novel wing-flapping behavior prior to copulation, similarities in other mating habits, egg sac handling, and embryonic development between Nocticolidae and sister family Corydiidae suggested that the two groups share a common ancestor. Elucidating these relationships will help infer the evolutionary history of modern-day insects. (2020-11-05)

Muscle pain and energy-rich blood: Cholesterol medicine affects the organs differently
Contrary to expectation, treatment with statins has a different effect on blood cells than on muscle cells, a new study from the University of Copenhagen reveals. Today, statins are mainly used in the treatment of elevated cholesterol, but the new results may help design drugs for a number of conditions. (2020-10-29)

'Happy ending effect' can bias future decisions, say scientists
Our brains can't always reliably evaluate experiences that unfold over time. We tend to give disproportionate weight to the later part of an experience. This can lead to bad decisions when choosing whether to repeat an experience. (2020-10-19)

Gut bacteria in multiple sclerosis: Probiotic or commensal, good or bad?
Though evidence suggests that the gut microbiome modulates risk of multiple sclerosis, new findings from the University of Vermont highlight complex interactions between host genetics and environmental factors impact susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. Strategies to prevent or treat multiple sclerosis should take into account host genetics, the pre-existing gut microbiome, and the timing or mode of the intervention. (2020-10-19)

Malice leaves a nasty smell
Unhealthy behaviours trigger moral judgments that are similar to the basic emotions that contribute to our ability to survive. Two different hypotheses are to be found in the current scientific literature as to the identity of these emotions. After developing a new approach to brain imaging, a research team from the University of Geneva shows that unhealthy behaviours trigger brain responses that are similar to those prompted by bad smells. (2020-10-16)

Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers
Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests. Academics from the University of Cambridge believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations - which seems to happen whether or not they are personally easy to anger - may be because they are 'rehearsing' strategies to cope with hot-headed friends. (2020-10-06)

COVID-19 infects majority of bad dreams -- study
Researchers crowdsourced dream content from more than 800 people during the sixth week of the COVID-19 lockdown and found many experienced distressed dreams related to the pandemic. They used an algorithm to analyze and map the data into 33 themed clusters. The coronavirus haunted more than half of the 20 clusters classified as nightmares. The paper has implications for further studies related to mental health. (2020-10-01)

Aberrant electronic and structural alterations in pressure tuned perovskite NaOsO3
In summary, a comprehensive temperature-dependent electrical transport, Raman scattering, synchrotron XRD, and DFT study has been carried out to understand the effect of external pressure on perovskite NaOsO3. (2020-09-18)

Fructose and glucose in high fructose corn syrup deliver a one-two punch to health
Consuming high fructose corn syrup appears to be as bad for your health as consuming sugar in the form of fructose alone, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The study reports health risks related to the type of sugar consumed, but also reveals novel risks when sugars are combined, which has important implications for dietary guidelines. (2020-09-17)

The Josep Carreras Institute identifies a marker of poor evolution in Hodgkin's lymphoma
Dr. Manel Esteller, director of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute, published today in Blood journal, the discovery of a marker that allows predicting which patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma will present the aggressive clinical course, and will therefore be a case of special risk. (2020-09-15)

Decoding the genetics that drive disease
From Alzheimer's to obesity, life can change dramatically if you discover you have a genetic risk of disease. Now, a new study from the Australian Centre for Precision Health, University of South Australia is challenging these predispositions, showing that some of the genes traditionally labelled as 'bad' are not always what they seem. (2020-09-15)

Children will wait to impress others -- another twist on the classic marshmallow test
When it comes to self-control, young children are better able to resist temptation and wait for greater rewards if they take into consideration the opinions of others. (2020-09-10)

The marshmallow test revisited
Children will wait longer for a treat to impress others, new psychology experiments show. (2020-09-09)

Algorithm aims to alert consumers before they use illicit online pharmacies
In a study, a team of Penn State researchers report that an algorithm they developed may be able to spot illicit online pharmacies that could be providing customers with substandard medications without their knowledge, among other potential problems. (2020-08-28)

How Covid-19 smell loss differs from the common cold
New research is the first to compare how Covid-19 smell loss differs from what you might experience with a bad cold or flu. The main differences found are that Covid-19 patients can breathe freely, do not tend to have a runny or blocked nose, and they cannot detect bitter or sweet tastes. These findings lend weight to the theory that Covid-19 infects the brain and central nervous system. (2020-08-18)

Glacial stream insect may tolerate warmer waters
An endangered aquatic insect that lives in icy streams fed by glaciers might not mind if the water grows warmer due to climate change. A study published in Global Change Biology on July 22 found that mountain stoneflies can tolerate warmer water temperatures at least temporarily. In fact, they might even be stressed in their current extremely cold environments. (2020-07-27)

What are the properties of the cryptocurrency market?
In terms of its structure and organization, the cryptocurrency market is a rather young and a very specific financial market. Due to its relatively short history, it is difficult to fully analyze the cryptocurrency market (it appeared only in 2009), which makes this task even more attractive for researchers. (2020-07-27)

Living with a problem gambler?
With the lure of online gambling high during COVID-19 lockdowns - and some gambling venues now reopening - partners and families of problem gamblers may be the first to see a problem emerging. Many problem gamblers do not acknowledge their addiction and do not seek help - and that's when people close to them need support to cope, and potentially even help turn the situation around by motivating a partner to seek help. (2020-07-21)

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