Current Banking News and Events

Current Banking News and Events, Banking News Articles.
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How likely are consumers to adopt artificial intelligence for banking advice?
A new study published in Economic Inquiry is the first to assess the willingness of consumers to adopt advisory services in the banking sector that are based on artificial intelligence (AI). (2021-02-18)

Not all banking crises involve panics
Historically, even ''quiet'' banking crises without customer panics can cause losses leading to economy-wide downturns, according to new research co-led by MIT Sloan's Emil Verner. (2021-02-05)

The world's first integrated quantum communication network
Chinese scientists have established the world's first integrated quantum communication network, combining over 700 optical fibers on the ground with two ground-to-satellite links to achieve quantum key distribution over a total distance of 4,600 kilometers for users across the country. (2021-01-06)

Bank-affiliated funds contribute to funding their parent banks in times of crisis
So reveals academic research involving the collaboration of Javier Gil-Bazo, a professor at the UPF Department of Economics and Business, with Peter Hoffmann and Sergio Mayordomo, published in the renowned journal Review of Financial Studies.The study shows that banks in Spain strategically resort to this practice especially in times of crisis, when access to traditional funding is limited and costly, and therefore the incentives are greater. (2020-11-25)

Despite industry wariness, stress tests found to strengthen banks of all sizes
Despite additional costs, increased restrictions, and issues stemming from compliance directives, research recently published by Raffi E. Garcia, an assistant professor in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute shows that government-mandated stress tests are effective in strengthening the overall health of the multi-trillion-dollar American banking industry. (2020-11-17)

Dealing a blow on monetarism
This year's third issue of the Financial Journal opens with an article by Marina Malkina, Professor at the Department of Economic Theory and Methodology of the UNN Institute of Economics and Entrepreneurship, and Igor Moiseev, research assistant at the Center for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics of the same Institute. Their article entitled ''Endogeneity of Money Supply in the Russian Economy in the Context of the Monetary Regime Change'' is published in the ''Monetary policy'' section. (2020-08-27)

Research suggests viability of brain computer to improve function in paralyzed patient
Researchers demonstrated the success of a fully implantable wireless medical device called a stentrode brain-computer interface designed to improve functional independence in patients with severe paralysis. The abstract was presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 17th Annual Meeting. (2020-08-06)

Study reveals impact of powerful CEOs and money laundering on bank performance
Banks with powerful CEOs and smaller boards are more likely to take risks and be susceptible to money laundering. The study tested for a link between bank risk and enforcements issued by US regulators for money laundering in almost 1,000 publicly listed US banks. The results show that money laundering enforcements are associated with an increase in bank risk. The impact of money laundering is heightened by the presence of powerful CEOs and only partly mitigated by large and independent executive boards. (2020-08-04)

Doxycycline ineffective at shrinking aortic aneurysms in two-year study
Patients with a vascular condition called abdominal aortic aneurysm did not benefit from taking the common antibiotic doxycycline for two years to shrink the aneurysm when compared to those who took a placebo, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (2020-05-27)

Virologists show that sample pooling can massively increase coronavirus testing capacity
To contain the coronavirus pandemic, global testing capacity for the SARS-CoV-2 virus needs to be ramped up significantly. Scientists at the Institute of Virology at Saarland University Medical Centre have developed a pool testing procedure now published in the high-ranking, international scientific journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (2020-04-28)

'Bursty' email communication helps groups convert resources into results
A new study looked at more than 1,300 retail banking sales teams in a large regional bank to explore whether groups vary in how they convert resources into performance. The study found that resources are generally helpful, but groups differ in the results they achieve. The variation is also largely associated with the group's coordinated attention - specifically, their patterns of email communication. The findings have implications for how firms can operate more efficiently. (2020-04-23)

Unintended pregnancy rates higher among women with disabilities, study says
Pregnancies among women with disabilities are 42% more likely to be unintended than pregnancies among women without disabilities, says a new report published in the journal Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health. (2020-02-28)

Social banks rely on their motivated investors
The main reason for the existence of social banks is to fund other social enterprises. On that basis, Simon Cornée from the University of Rennes 1, Panu Kalmi from the University of Vaasa and Ariane Szafarz from the Université Libre de Bruxelles propose that social banks can operate profitably and still lend to their borrowers at attractive interest rates when their owners and depositors accept lower returns on their investments. (2020-02-25)

Financial pressure makes CFOs less likely to blow the whistle
A recent study finds that corporate financial managers do a great job of detecting signs of potential fraud, but are less likely to voice these concerns externally when their company is under pressure to meet a financial target. (2020-02-10)

Computer servers now able to retrieve data much faster
Computer scientists at the University of Waterloo have found a novel approach that significantly improves the storage efficiency and output speed of computer systems. (2020-01-30)

Organized cybercrime -- not your average mafia
Research from Michigan State University is one of the first to identify common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year. (2020-01-16)

Collective leadership groups maintain cohesion and act decisively
Members of collective leadership groups can maintain cohesion and act decisively when faced with a crisis, in spite of lacking the formal authority to do so, according to new research from Cass Business School. (2020-01-13)

A more intuitive online banking service would reinforce its use among the over-55s
The very nature of online banking is the cause of the reticence of the over-55s to use it as they do not feel comfortable navigating the 'digital world'. To combat this situation, the experts recommend developing more intuitive applications with appropriate signposting and instructions to help avoid errors. (2019-12-18)

Efficient, but not without help
HSE University economists analyzed what banks performed best on the Russian market from 2004 to 2015 - state, private, or foreign -owned ones. They found out that during stable economic and political periods, foreign- owned banks tend to take the lead, while during a crisis period, such as from 2008 to 2013, state -owned banks outperformed them. The article was published in the Emerging Markets Finance and Trade journal. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1540496X.2019.1668764 (2019-11-14)

Secretive targets for CEO bonus pay signal poor performance
Investors need to pay closer attention to the non-financial measures linked to CEO cash bonuses, because targets that are not disclosed, or undefined, in annual reports are associated with worse company performance down the track, new research reveals. (2019-10-16)

Experts focus on food insecurity and its far-reaching consequences, particularly in vulnerable populations
Food insecurity is a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life, according to the US Department of Agriculture. The latest issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, focuses on food insecurity in vulnerable populations including children, youth, college students, and older adults; raises awareness of the consequences of food insecurity for health and wellbeing; and presents strategies for addressing this serious problem. (2019-09-25)

Global liquidity shocks impact house prices
New research from Cass Business School has found that global liquidity shocks do impact house prices in both emerging and advanced economies but this can be mitigated by government policy. (2019-09-24)

Battery icons shape perceptions of time and space and define user identities
Research from Cass Business School finds battery icons on mobile phones shape how people view time and space, and how battery conservation practices define user identities. (2019-09-12)

Giving people a 'digital identity' could leave them vulnerable to discrimination, experts warn
Global efforts to give millions of people missing key paper documents such as a birth certificates a digital identity could leave them vulnerable to persecution or discrimination, a new study warns. (2019-08-30)

Negative interest rate policies are backfiring -- new research
Negative interest rate policies in Europe and Japan were intended to stimulate flagging economies but research from the University of Bath they may be doing more harm than good. (2019-08-29)

Study reveals school savings accounts can dry up in 'financial deserts'
College of Business Professor studies the impact geography has on San Francisco's Children's Savings Accounts program. (2019-08-14)

Freezing cells made safer thanks to new polymer made at University of Warwick
Cell freezing (cryopreservation) -- which is essential in cell transfusions as well as basic biomedical research -- can be dramatically improved using a new polymeric cryoprotectant, discovered at the University of Warwick, which reduces the amount of 'anti-freeze' needed to protect cells. (2019-07-29)

New time-banking system utilizes blockchain tech to measure one's value to society
Citizens from the island of Aneityum in the Republic of Vanuatu are working with faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York to test their true value as humans. (2019-06-17)

Algorithm to transform investment banking with higher returns
A University of Bath researcher has created an algorithm which aims to remove the elements of chance, bias or emotion from investment banking decisions, a development which has the potential to reduce errors in financial decision making and improve financial returns in global markets. (2019-06-12)

Why you may be prone to hiring a liar, and not even know it
Researchers find that people don't always disapprove of deception. In fact, they perceive the ability to deceive as an asset in occupations that are stereotyped as high in 'selling orientation.' (2019-06-11)

Secure metropolitan quantum networks move a step closer
Successful new field tests of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) system over commercial fiber networks could pave the way to its use in metropolitan areas. That is the key achievement from a joint team of Chinese scientists, published today in Quantum Science and Technology, which demonstrates CV-QKD transmission over commercial deployed fiber link with a distance of 50 kilometers. (2019-05-29)

Medicare spending higher among older adults with disabilities who lack adequate support
A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that more than one in five older adults who were aging in place with a mobility or self-care disability reported experiencing negative consequences such as having to stay in bed or going without eating due to no one being available to help or the activity being too difficult to perform alone. (2019-05-28)

Sex sells: how masculinity is used as currency to buy sperm donors' time
Sperm banks in the United Kingdom and Australia use images and phrases associated with masculinity to attract donors because laws prohibit them from paying for sperm. (2019-05-20)

Early exposure to banking influences life-long financial health
Growing up in a community with or without banks has a long-term effect on how you build and manage credit, according to a new Iowa State University study. The research shows individuals who grow up in what are essentially 'financial deserts' are slow to apply for credit and as adults have lower credit scores and more delinquent accounts. (2019-05-16)

SUTD researchers demystify centralization in cryptocurrency mining
SUTD researchers have developed a novel approach to untangle the centralization phenomena in blockchain mining by employing the rich economic theory of Oceanic Games. The application of this theory in the blockchain ecosystem unveiled incentives for both active and newly entering miners to merge and act as single entities and provides an alternative justification of the centralization and concentration of power in the mining process of major cryptocurrencies. (2019-05-14)

House hunting is a struggle for mixed-race families
Couples with a black partner were significantly more likely to move to a neighborhood that was racially diverse but less affluent. And because schools are generally funded through local property taxes, that means their children get fewer resources for their education. (2019-04-29)

Meal kits and recipe tastings increase healthy food selections among food pantry clients
Food pantry clients are more likely to select nutrient dense products when they are arranged with all ingredients needed to make a meal. These findings can help food pantries maximize the nutritional quality of food available and improve the diets of their clients. (2019-03-19)

Slicing optical beams: Cryptographic algorithms for quantum networks
The mathematical models can be used not only for quantum networks and authentication but also for full-scale quantum computing. Quantum hashing can help protect quantum algorithms against mistakes. Relevant research is currently in progress at Kazan Federal University. (2018-12-13)

Virus- and oncogene-free reprogramming method for the production of iPSCs published in the journal
Regenerative Medicine is delighted to publish open access original research demonstrating the first virus- and oncogene-free induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to produce safer pluripotent stem cells from cord blood and peripheral blood. (2018-12-06)

Hurdles to workers' and capital's flow between firms: The roots of sluggish productivity
Since the financial crisis of 2007, with no seeming reason, productivity growth has been slowing down in all the major economies. Part of the explanation of this productivity puzzle in advanced economies may lie in a generalized difficulty of reallocating resources between firms in the same industry and in the same geographical area, a new study by Gianmarco Ottaviano, Professor of Economics at Bocconi University, and colleagues, finds. (2018-11-09)

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