Current Barium Titanate News and Events

Current Barium Titanate News and Events, Barium Titanate News Articles.
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Plant-based magnetic nanoparticles with antifungal properties
A team of researchers from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University obtained magnetic nanoparticles using sweet flag (Acorus calamus). Both the roots and the leaves of this plant have antioxidant, antimicrobial, and insecticide properties. (2021-02-10)

Focusing on field analysis
One potential approach to developing a low-cost portable microscopy system is to use transparent microspheres in combination with affordable low-magnification objective lenses to increase image resolution and sensitivity. (2021-01-27)

Optical scanner design for adaptive driving beam systems can lead to safer night driving
In a recent study published in the Journal of Optical Microsystems, researchers from Japan have come up with an alternative to conventional adaptive driving beam systems: a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) optical scanner that relies on the piezoelectric effect of electrically induced mechanical vibrations. (2021-01-27)

Boosted photocatalysis for hydrogen evolution: Reactant supply thru phosphonate groups
Water splitting research for solar hydrogen production has focused on physical processes inside the semiconductor, such as light absorption, charge separation, and chemical processes on the surface that are highly complex and rely on the development of new materials. The concept proposed in this study is design of the electrolyte-photocatalyst interface. The approach of immobilizing functional groups near the solid-liquid interface can be a broad-ranging methodology that is effective regardless of the materials used. (2021-01-20)

Scientists have synthesized an unusual superconducting barium superhydride
A new exotic compound, BaH12, has been discovered by experiment and theory. Unusually, it is a molecular metal and demonstrates the superconducting transition around 20?K at 140?GPa (2021-01-12)

New analysis highlights importance of groundwater discharge into oceans
An invisible flow of groundwater seeps into the ocean along coastlines all over the world. Scientists have tended to disregard its contributions to ocean chemistry, focusing on the far greater volumes of water and dissolved material entering the sea from rivers and streams, but a new study finds groundwater discharge plays a more significant role than had been thought. (2021-01-08)

Record-setting thermoelectric figure of merit achieved for metal oxides
Scientists at Hokkaido University have developed a layered cobalt oxide with a record-setting thermoelectric figure of merit, which can be used to enhance thermoelectric power generation. (2020-12-22)

Researchers invent method to 'sketch' quantum devices with focused electrons
A technique created by researchers out of the Department of Physics and Astronomy enables them to ''sketch'' patterns of electrons into a programmable quantum material--lanthanum aluminate/strontium titanate or ''LAO/STO''. (2020-12-21)

New type of ultrahigh piezoelectricity in hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics
A new strategy is proposed to generate ultra-high piezoelectric coefficients, and many hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics (e.g., organic PhMDA) can be ideal candidates owing to the specific features of hydrogen bonding. Their Curie temperature can be approximately doubled upon a tensile strain as low as 2 %, which can be tuned exactly to room-temperature by fixing a strain in one direction, and in another direction, an unprecedented ultra-high piezoelectric coefficient can be obtained. (2020-11-20)

A filter for environmental remediation
Scientists at Osaka University discovered a new method for producing sodium titanate mats nanostructured in a seaweed-like morphology for filtering heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from water. This work may lead to advances in treating contaminated wastewater. (2020-11-19)

Researchers prove titanate nanotubes composites enhance photocatalysis of hydrogen
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from National Taiwan University examined the photocatalytic performances of titanate nanotubes (TNTs) against commonly-used titanium dioxide (TiO2) and discovered superior performance of TNTs. (2020-10-27)

Well-formed disorder for versatile light technologies
Researchers at ETH have managed to make an efficient material for broadband frequency doubling of light using microspheres made of disordered nanocrystals. The crucial idea for the method arose during a coffee break. In the future, the new approach could be used in lasers and other light technologies. (2020-10-13)

New anode material could lead to safer fast-charging batteries
Scientists at UC San Diego have discovered a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles. Known as a disordered rocksalt, the new anode is made up of earth-abundant lithium, vanadium and oxygen atoms arranged in a similar way as ordinary kitchen table salt, but randomly. It is promising for commercial applications where both high energy density and high power are desired, such as electric cars, vacuum cleaners or drills. (2020-09-02)

Researchers demonstrate fundamentally new approach to ultrasound imaging
Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for creating ultrasound images. The new approach is substantially simpler than existing techniques and could significantly drive down technology costs. (2020-08-13)

Anode material for safe batteries with a long cycle life
Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Jilin University in Changchun/China investigated a highly promising anode material for future high-performance batteries - lithium lanthanum titanate with a perovskite crystal structure (LLTO). As the team reported in the Nature Communications journal, LLTO can improve the energy density, power density, charging rate, safety, and cycle life of batteries without requiring a decrease of the particle size from micro to nano scale. (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-17233-1) (2020-08-06)

New chemical analyzes: What did Danes and Italians in the Middle Ages have in common?
Chemists have analyzed bones from a Danish and an Italian cemetery, casting light on the lives of nobles and common people in the north and the south of Europe. (2020-07-15)

New materials of perovskite challenge the chemical intuition
Materials scientists have synthesized a new type of perovskite--one of the most common crystal structures of materials deployed for a range of uses, from superconductors to photovoltaics--that goes against conventional thinking about how such structures behave at extreme pressures such as those that exist deep in the Earth. (2020-06-30)

'Ironing' out the differences: Understanding superconductivity in ultrathin FeSe
Scientists at Tokyo Tech elucidate the underlying cause behind the different critical transition temperatures reported for ultrathin iron selenide (FeSe) superconductors. Their results clarify why the interface between the first FeSe layer and its substrate play an essential role in superconductivity, giving new insights into a long-standing puzzle in this field. (2020-06-24)

A blue spark to shine on the origin of the Universe
An interdisciplinary team of scientists led by researchers from DIPC, Ikerbasque and UPV/EHU, has demonstrated that it is possible to build an ultra-sensitive sensor based on a new fluorescent molecule able to detect the nuclear decay key to knowing whether or not a neutrino is its own antiparticle. The results of this study, published in the prestigious journal Nature, have great potential to determine the nature of the neutrino and thus answer fundamental questions about the origin of the Universe. (2020-06-23)

Diabetic mice improve with retrievable millimeter-thick cell-laden hydrogel fiber
Researchers from The University of Tokyo developed a novel fiber-shaped hydrogel transplant for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. They showed that pancreatic cells encapsulated in 1.0-mm-thick hydrogel fibers normalized blood glucose levels in diabetic mice while being protected from foreign body reactions. These findings help facilitate cell-based therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus. (2020-06-15)

Solar hydrogen production: Splitting water with UV is now at almost 100% quantum efficiency
Scientists in Japan successfully split water into hydrogen and oxygen using light and meticulously designed catalysts, and they did so at the maximum efficiency meaning there was almost no loss and undesired side reactions. This latest breakthrough in solar hydrogen production makes the likelihood of scalable, economically viable hydrogen production more than likely, paving the way for humanity to make the switch to clean energy. (2020-06-03)

UCLA physicists develop world's best quantum bits
A team of researchers at UCLA has set a new record for preparing and measuring the quantum bits, or qubits, inside of a quantum computer without error. The techniques they have developed make it easier to build quantum computers that outperform classical computers for important tasks, including the design of new materials and pharmaceuticals. (2020-05-18)

To make an atom-sized machine, you need a quantum mechanic
Here's a new chapter in the story of the miniaturisation of machines: researchers in a laboratory in Singapore have shown that a single atom can function as either an engine or a fridge. Such a device could be engineered into future computers and fuel cells to control energy flows. (2020-05-04)

User research at BESSY II: How new materials increase the efficiency of direct ethanol fuel cells
A group from Brazil and an HZB team have investigated a novel composite membrane for ethanol fuel cells. It consists of the polymer Nafion, in which nanoparticles of a titanium compound are embedded by the rarely explored melt extrusion process. At BESSY II they were able to observe in detail, how the nanoparticles in the Nafion matrix are distributed and how they contribute to increase proton conductivity. (2020-05-04)

Environment-friendly compound shows promise for solar cell use
In research published today in Advanced Functional Materials, a team of engineers, material scientists, and physicists demonstrated how a new material -- a lead-free chalcogenide perovskite -- that hadn't previously been considered for use in solar cells could provide a safer and more effective option than others that are commonly considered. (2020-04-24)

Skoltech and MIPT scientists find a rule to predict new superconducting metal hydrides
The search for coveted high-temperature superconductors is going to get easier with a new 'law within a law' discovered by Skoltech and MIPT researchers and their colleagues, who figured out a link between an element's position in the Periodic Table and its potential to form a high-temperature superconducting hydride. (2020-04-16)

Discovery offers new avenue for next-generation data storage
The demands for data storage and processing have grown exponentially as the world becomes increasingly connected, emphasizing the need for new materials capable of more efficient data storage and data processing. An international team of researchers, led by physicist Paul Ching-Wu Chu, is reporting a new compound capable of maintaining its skyrmion properties at room temperature, offering promise for commercial applications. (2020-04-14)

Cold sintering produces capacitor material at record low temperatures
Barium titanate is an important electroceramic material used in trillions of capacitors each year and found in most electronics. Penn State researchers have produced the material at record low temperatures, and the discovery could lead to more energy efficient manufacturing. (2020-02-26)

Quantum technologies: New insights into superconducting processes
Superconductors are regarded as promising components for quantum computers, but so far they only function at very low temperatures. Scientists at Münster University (Germany) now demonstrated a so-called energy quantization in nanowires of high-temperature superconductors. The study has been published in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-02-10)

New quasi-particle discovered: The Pi-ton
New particles are usually only found in huge particle accelerators. But something quite similar can be found in a simple lab or in computer simulations: a quasiparticle. It behaves just like a particle, but its existence depends, in some subtle way, on its environment. Scientists in Vienna have now discovered a surprising new quasiparticle called 'pi-ton'. (2020-02-04)

Ecofriendly catalyst for converting methane into useful gases using light instead of heat
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), National Institute for Materials Science, Kochi University of Technology, Shizuoka University, and Kyushu University developed a catalyst to convert abundant methane gas into more useful synthesis gas. Unlike conventional catalysts, this catalyst operates at much lower temperatures by using light, thus saving a tremendous amount of energy in the methane conversion process, and shows much better performance with high stability. (2020-01-27)

Transparency discovered in crystals with ultrahigh piezoelectricity
Use of an AC rather than a DC electric field can improve the piezoelectric response of a crystal. Now, an international team of researchers say that cycles of AC fields also make the internal crystal domains in some materials bigger and the crystal transparent. (2020-01-15)

Exploring the 'dark side' of a single-crystal complex oxide thin film
A new study offers a nanoscopic view of complex oxides, which have great potential for advanced microelectronics. (2020-01-06)

Scientists create thin films with tantalizing electronic properties
Scientists have created thin films made from barium zirconium sulfide (BaZrS3) and confirmed that the materials have alluring electronic and optical properties predicted by theorists. The films combine exceptionally strong light absorption with good charge transport -- qualities that make them ideal for applications such as photovoltaics and LEDs. (2019-12-23)

It's a small (coal-polluted) world, after all
A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry underscores that the release of pollutants in one region can have implications beyond its borders; emphasizing the dire need for global collaboration on environmental issues. (2019-12-20)

Mechanical force as a new way of starting chemical reactions
Researchers have shown mechanical force can start chemical reactions, making them cheaper, more broadly applicable, and more environmentally friendly than conventional methods. (2019-12-19)

Efficient bottom-up synthesis of new perovskite material for the production of ammonia
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) found a way to synthesize a special type of perovskite that promotes the production of ammonia, which has key applications in fertilizer production and hydrogen energy. This new synthesis process can be carried out at temperatures immensely lower than that of traditional methods for the synthesis of perovskite-oxide materials and in much less time, and the produced perovskite outperforms all its competitors for producing ammonia. (2019-11-22)

Research reveals new state of matter: a Cooper pair metal
In a finding that reveals an entirely new state of matter, research published in the journal Science shows that Cooper pairs, electron duos that enable superconductivity, can also conduct electricity like normal metals do. (2019-11-14)

Superconducting wind turbine chalks up first test success
A superconducting rotor has been successfully tested on an active wind turbine for the first time. The EcoSwing consortium designed, developed, manufactured a full-size superconducting generator for a 3.6 megawatt wind turbine, and field-tested it in Thyborøn, Denmark. (2019-11-12)

Upcycling polyethylene plastic waste into lubricant oils
Plastics pervade almost every aspect of modern life, but once they have served their purpose, it's tough to get rid of them. That's because the polymers degrade very slowly in landfills or the environment, and recycling is inefficient. Now researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a catalyst that can transform polyethylene -- the type of plastic used to make grocery bags and other packaging -- into high-quality liquid products, such as motor oils and waxes. (2019-10-23)

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