Current Baseball News and Events

Current Baseball News and Events, Baseball News Articles.
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Presidential inaugurations boost tourism, but not this year
While new research from West Virginia University economists finds that presidential inaugurations have gained popularity as must-see tourist events in recent years, major security threats will keep visitors away for the inauguration of President-Elect Joe Biden. (2021-01-14)

Breakthrough optical sensor mimics human eye, a key step toward better AI
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Researchers at Oregon State University are making key advances with a new type of optical sensor that more closely mimics the human eye's ability to perceive changes in its visual field. (2020-12-08)

Head in the game
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba find that blind soccer players rotate their heads downward when trapping an incoming pass. This work may lead to an improved understanding of the sensory changes that can manifest in visually impaired individuals. (2020-11-24)

Plasma treatments quickly kill coronavirus on surfaces
Researchers from UCLA believe using plasma could promise a significant breakthrough in the fight against the spread of COVID-19. In Physics of Fluids, modeling conducted showed strains of the coronavirus on surfaces like metal, leather, and plastic were killed in as little as 30 seconds of treatment with argon-fed, cold atmospheric plasma. The researchers used an atmospheric pressure plasma jet they built with a 3D printer to spray surfaces that were treated with SARS-CoV-2 cultures. (2020-11-10)

Monkey see others, monkey do: How the brain allows actions based on social cues
Researchers at the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan have shown that when monkeys make decisions based on social cues provided by other monkeys, information flow from one part of the brain (the ventral premotor cortex) to another (medial prefrontal cortex) is vital. When this neuronal pathway is silenced temporarily, monkeys cannot catch the social cues and end up behaving like autistic monkeys. (2020-11-02)

Buzz kill: Ogre-faced spiders 'hear' airborne prey with their legs
In the dark of night, ogre-faced spiders with dominating big eyes dangle from a silk frame to cast a web and capture their ground prey. But these spiders also can capture insects flying behind them with precision, and Cornell University scientists have now confirmed how. (2020-10-29)

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications. (2020-10-22)

Fans arrive like butterflies: Pearl Jam concerts drive tourism, hotel demand
A pair of Pearl Jam concerts made a case that larger, one-off events tend to generate more hotel and tax revenues than sporting events, according to new research from West Virginia University economist Josh Hall. (2020-10-01)

New perception metric balances reaction time, accuracy
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new metric for evaluating how well self-driving cars respond to changing road conditions and traffic, making it possible for the first time to compare perception systems for both accuracy and reaction time. (2020-09-09)

CU Anschutz researchers shed light on split-second decision making
A little understood region of the cerebellum plays a critical role in making split-second 'go-no go' decisions, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-08-31)

How kirigami can help us study the muscular activity of athletes
Scientists devise an elastic and durable skin-contact patch for measuring the electromyographic activity of the palm muscle inspired by ancient Japanese paper crafts. (2020-02-12)

Resale ticket markets benefit sports teams and fans
New research co-authored by Yanwen Wang, an assistant professor in the UBC Sauder School of Business, reveals that the resale ticket market also appeals to sports fans who normally buy season tickets. (2020-01-14)

Not all changeups are created equal; seam shifted wake baffles hitters
While changing the rotation rate/axis of a thrown baseball has long been a weapon in a pitcher's arsenal, some pitchers, like Washington Nationals star Stephen Strasburg, manipulate the baseball's wake to create unexpected movement from a familiar delivery (his changeup). (2019-11-24)

The secret to sneaky float serves
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba performed wind tunnel experiments to determine the role of asymmetry caused by the orientation of a volleyball on its aerodynamic characteristics. They found that switching from the standard panel arrangement to a hexagonal or dimpled pattern may improve the consistency of flight, with many potential applications in aviation. (2019-10-10)

For young athletes, sport specialization means increased risk of injury
Specialization in a chosen sport is associated with a higher volume of activity -- and it could increase young athletes' risk of sustaining both traumatic- and overuse-based injuries, new study says. (2019-09-23)

Electric tech could help reverse baldness
Reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (2019-09-19)

Mortality rates of major league baseball players
Major league baseball (MLB) players had lower death rates overall and from many underlying causes of death compared with men in the general US population, differences that could be associated in part with the physical fitness required for their jobs. This research letter reports on an analysis of mortality rates among 10,451 baseball players who debuted in the MLB from 1906 through 2006, including differences in mortality rates by position and career length. (2019-07-22)

Outcomes of non-operatively treated elbow ulnar in professional baseball players
Professional baseball players with a low-grade elbow injury that occurs on the humeral side of the elbow have a better chance of returning to throw and returning to play, and a lower risk of ulnar collateral ligament surgery than players who suffered more severe injuries on the ulnar side of the elbow. The research was presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine. (2019-07-13)

Does autograft choice in ACL reconstruction affect recurrent ACL revision rates
Young athletes who have anterior cruciate ligament surgery are more likely to need an additional surgery if they received a hamstring graft compared to a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was conducted by group of clinicians led by Dr. Christopher C. Kaeding of Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. (2019-07-12)

Concussion is a leading cause of injury for children in recreational sports
In a two-year study of children between ages 5-11 who play recreational sports, more suffered concussions than most any other sports-related injury. (2019-06-03)

Wearable motion detectors identify subtle motor deficits in children
A wristwatch-like motion-tracking device can detect movement problems in children whose impairments may be overlooked by doctors and parents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2019-06-03)

Study analyzes mortality risks among pro athletes
A first-of-its-kind comparison between elite pro athletes suggests higher overall mortality among NFL players compared with MLB players. NFL players also appear to have higher risk of dying from cardiovascular and neurodegenerative causes compared with MLB peers.The differences warrant further study of sport-specific mechanisms of disease development. Clinicians treating current and former NFL players should be vigilant about the presence of cardiovascular and neurologic symptoms and promptly treat risk factors such as sleep apnea, obesity, hypertension. (2019-05-24)

Moneyball advantage peters out once everyone's doing it: Rotman paper
Sixteen years after author Michael Lewis wrote the book Moneyball, every Major League Baseball (MLB) team uses the technique. But a new study shows that while the tool can help a club create a stronger team -- at a lower cost -- it loses its edge once everyone's on to it. (2019-04-08)

NJIT mathematical sciences professor releases major league baseball predictions
NJIT Mathematical Sciences Professor and Associate Dean Bruce Bukiet has published his model's projections of how the standings should look at the end of Major League Baseball's regular season in 2019. (2019-03-28)

Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you
It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern that can replicate the experience in the laboratory. (2019-02-21)

The science of team sports
Joint successes in the past increase the chances of winning. This has now been statistically proven in a variety of different team sports. (2018-12-03)

In team sports, chemistry matters
Northwestern Engineering's Noshir Contractor and researchers analyzed game statistics across major sports and online games, revealing that past shared success among teammates improves their team's odds of winning future games. (2018-12-03)

Is your office messy? If so, you may be seen as uncaring, neurotic
An extremely messy personal space seems to lead people to believe the owner of that space is more neurotic and less agreeable, say University of Michigan researchers. (2018-11-27)

Putting a face on a cell surface
With the help of machine learning, ETH researchers have been able to thoroughly describe the repertoire proteins on the cell surface for the first time. The latest findings are opening up new approaches in pharmaceutical research. (2018-11-21)

Explaining a fastball's unexpected twist
An unexpected twist from fastball can make the difference in winning or losing the World Series. However, 'some explanations regarding the different pitches are flat-out wrong,' said Barton Smith, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Utah State University who considers himself a big fan of the game. He and Nazmus Sakib are conducting experiments to explain how baseballs move. Sakib and Smith will present at the Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting, Nov. 18-20. (2018-11-18)

Laser blasting antimatter into existence
Antimatter is an exotic material that vaporizes when it contacts regular matter. If you hit an antimatter baseball with a bat made of regular matter, it would explode in a burst of light. It is rare to find antimatter on Earth, but it is believed to exist in the furthest reaches of the universe. Amazingly, antimatter can be created out of thin air... (2018-11-05)

Research supports the ump, distance to a close play is critical in making the right call
New research from Arizona State University is showing that when it comes to the bang-bang plays in baseball viewing distance from the play is critical for judging what actually happened. In other words, the umpire being much closer to the action is in a better position to make the right call compared to a fan in the stands 100 or 200 feet away. (2018-10-23)

The short, tumultuous working life of a major league baseball pitcher
There are pitchers in Major League Baseball (MLB) who have had 30-year careers, but as UC Riverside demographer David Swanson points out, these are extreme outliers and often the stars of the game who receive most of the media's attention. The reality for most pitchers in baseball is that their professional working lives are surprisingly short--3.99 years on average--according to a new method of calculating working life expectancies. (2018-07-22)

Why did home runs surge in baseball? Statistics provides twist on hot topic
Around the middle of the 2015 season, something odd started happening in Major League Baseball (MLB): Home runs surged. They surged again in 2016 and then again in 2017. Statistician Jason Wilson provides this explanation. The quality of pitching between 2015 and 2017 had gotten worse if one breaks a pitch down into measurable components and then measured pitching quality over time. Wilson called this measure ''Quality of Pitch'' (QOP). (2018-07-22)

Are star players over-rated in MLB? A key statistic doesn't stand up to scrutiny
Assessing play quality In baseball is complicated. ''Wins above replacement player'' (WARP) aggregate a player's total contribution to their team--offense and defense and primary position--into one easily understood statistics. But does it actually measure--or even roughly estimate--player value? Ph.D. student Austin Brown investigated the 2014-2017 MLB seasons and didn't find that WARP was related to wins. (2018-07-22)

For professional baseball players, faster hand-eye coordination linked to batting performance
Professional baseball players who score higher on a test of hand-eye coordination have better batting performance -- particularly in drawing walks and other measures of 'plate discipline,' reports a study in the July issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-07-17)

Can watching pro sports on tv prevent crime?
The entertainment provided by televised sporting events has a significant effect on crime in Chicago, reducing the number of violent, property and drug crime reports by as much as 25 percent during the hours of a given game, according to a study by the UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program. (2018-06-13)

Spooky quantum particle pairs fly like weird curveballs
Some particles that can be in two places at the same time and are not just particles but also waves, in this case, fermions, appear to move in even weirder ways than previously thought. Theoretical physicists at Georgia Tech applied extreme computing power for a week to predict the movements of fermions by including quantum optics, or light-like, ideas in their mathematical, theoretical modeling. (2018-06-04)

New study finds pitcher injuries increase as pitch count rises
More than half of high school baseball pitchers report experiencing pain in their throwing arm during the season. To better understand the cause of these injuries, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to determine when and why overuse injuries were occurring. (2018-06-01)

For high school baseball pitchers, extra throws on game day add up but go uncounted
For high school baseball pitchers, limiting throws during a game helps to prevent fatigue and injuries. But nearly half the number of pitches -- ones thrown during warm-ups and in the bullpen -- are typically not counted, adding significantly to a pitcher's risk of injury, new findings by University of Florida Health researchers show. (2018-05-01)

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