Current Basis News and Events

Current Basis News and Events, Basis News Articles.
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New molecular structures associated with ALS
Researchers from the University of Seville and the University of Pavia have identified a link between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and the accumulation of DNA-RNA hybrids in the genome. The accumulation of these hybrids causes increased genomic damage and boosts genetic instability. This finding will make it possible to better understand the molecular basis of the disease, as well as to propose new solutions to curb it. (2021-01-13)

Scientists present a comprehensive physics basis for a new fusion reactor design
As part of the Journal of Plasma Physics' continuing focus on the scientific progress in fusion physics, the journal editors and Cambridge University Press are proud to present an important Special Issue of JPP, the 'Status of the SPARC Physics Basis'. (2020-09-29)

Marine heatwaves like 2015's Pacific "blob" attributable to anthropogenic climate warming
Severe marine heatwaves, like 2015's Pacific ''blob,'' are far more likely to occur now than before human-induced global warming began, according to a new study. (2020-09-24)

New dating of Nebra sky disk
Until now the Nebra sky disk was deemed to be from the Early Bronze Age and therefore the world's oldest depiction of the cosmos. Archaeologists from Goethe University Frankfurt and Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich have now reanalysed diverse data on the reconstruction of the discovery site and surrounding circumstances of the find. Their findings are that the disk must be dated in the Iron Age, making it about 1,000 years younger than previously assumed. This makes all previous astronomical interpretations obsolete. (2020-09-03)

Bioactive natural compounds for the fight against cancer
Phytoalexins are bioactive phytochemicals that have attracted much attention in recent years due to their health-promoting effects in humans and their vital role in plant health. TUD-Chemists have now developed a new and very efficient synthesis for these substances. With the new method, they are paving the way for a simpler production of phytoalexins and thus for large-scale investigations into their effects, especially with regard to their positive influence in the fight against cancer. (2020-06-25)

Advances in nanoparticles as anticancer drug delivery vector: Need of this century
This review article provides a summary of current advances in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) as anticancer drug-delivery vectors. (2020-06-04)

NUI Galway study establishes how cognitive intelligence is a whole brain phenomenon
An international collaborative study led by researchers from the NUI Galway provides findings on the neural basis of intelligence, otherwise known as general cognitive ability (IQ). (2020-03-26)

Research brief: Origin of deadly wheat pathogen revealed
A team of researchers has uncovered the basis of stem rust pathogen Ug99's wide virulence, attacking a direct threat to the world wheat supply. (2019-11-07)

HTA in the European network: Osteoporosis screening without proof of benefit
For the first time, IQWiG was in charge of a health technology assessment for the European network EUnetHTA. According to the conclusion, the benefit of osteoporosis screening is not proven. (2019-09-17)

Nordic researchers: A quarter of the world's population at risk of developing tuberculosis
A new study from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University, Denmark, has shown that probably 1 in 4 people in the world carry the tuberculosis bacterium in the body. The disease tuberculosis is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, which affects more than 10 million people every year, and kills up to 2 million, making it the most deadly of the infectious diseases. (2019-08-02)

Understanding why virus can't replicate in human cells could improve vaccines
The identification of a gene that helps to restrict the host range of the modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) could lead to the development of new and improved vaccines against diverse infectious agents, according to a study published May 30, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bernard Moss of the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues. (2019-05-30)

Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week. (2019-05-17)

How the olfactory brain affects memory
How sensory perception in the brain affects learning and memory processes is far from fully understood. Two neuroscientists of Ruhr-Universität Bochum have discovered a new aspect of how the processing of odours impacts memory centres. They showed that the piriform cortex -- a part of the olfactory brain -- has a direct influence on information storage in our most important memory structure, the hippocampus. (2019-04-29)

Listeners immerse themselves in audiobooks in very different ways
In the future, a new brain research method could be used to study creativity. (2019-04-12)

Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers
Scientists assessed the seed microbiomes of two successive plant generations for the first time and discovered that seeds are an important vector for transmission of beneficial endophytes across generations. (2019-03-25)

Genetic tricks of rabbits resistant to fatal viral disease
Underlying genetic variation in the immune systems of rabbits allowed them to rapidly evolve genetic resistance to the myxoma virus, a deadly rabbit pathogen introduced into Europe and Australia during the 1950s, according to a new study. (2019-02-14)

Basis of efficient blue-green light harvesting and photoprotection in diatoms revealed
Diatoms are abundant photosynthetic organisms in aquatic environments; they contribute 20 percent of global primary productivity. Their fucoxanthin (Fx) chlorophyll (Chl) a/c-binding proteins (FCPs) have exceptional light harvesting and photoprotection capabilities. However, the structure of the FCP proteins and arrangement of pigments within them remain unknown. A research team from the Key Laboratory of Photobiology, Institute of Botany solved the crystal structure of an FCP protein from a marine pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. (2019-02-11)

Computers can 'spot the difference' between healthy brains and the brains of people with DID
Machine-learning and neuroimaging techniques have been used to accurately distinguish between individuals with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) and healthy individuals, on the basis of their brain structure, in new research part funded by the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre and published in The British Journal of Psychiatry. (2018-12-06)

Individual metering of heating consumption could lead to savings of up to 20 percent
The UPV/EHU's ENEDI group has conducted a detailed study of the changes in habits brought about by individual metering and charging of heating and domestic hot water in a community of residents in Bilbao, a measure that is due to become compulsory once a Royal Decree currently being drawn up has been passed. As has been seen, this change could lead to savings of 20 percent, similar to ones found in similar studies focused on northern climates. (2018-09-03)

Unprecedented study identifies 44 genetic risk factors for major depression
A global research project has mapped out the genetic basis of major depression, identifying 44 genetic variants which are risk factors for depression, 30 of which are newly discovered. The study, by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium and co-led in the UK by King's College London, is the largest study to-date of genetic risk factors for major depression. (2018-04-26)

UK regional weather forecasts could be improved using jet stream data
Weather forecasters could be able to better predict regional rainfall and temperatures by using North Atlantic jet stream data, according to new research. Climate scientists examined the relationship between changes in North Atlantic atmospheric circulation -- or jet stream -- and UK regional weather variations during summer and winter months over the past 65 years, and found that the jet stream changes were significantly associated with variations in regional rainfall and temperatures. (2018-01-30)

Dengue 'Achilles heel' insight offers hope for better vaccines
Researchers have new insights into how protective antibodies attack dengue viruses, which could lead to more effective dengue fever vaccines and drug therapies. The University of Queensland and China's ZhuJiang Hospital collaboratively led the study which identified an antibody that binds to, and kills, all four types of dengue virus. (2017-12-18)

Fipronil in foods containing eggs: Estimations of maximum tolerable daily consumption
The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment has prepared a health risk assessment based on limited available data on fipronil levels in foods (containing eggs) in Germany. (2017-08-18)

A uranium-based compound improves manufacturing of nitrogen products
EPFL scientists have developed a uranium-based complex that can allow nitrogen fixation reactions to take place in ambient conditions. The work overcomes one of the biggest difficulties to building more efficient industrial-scale nitrogen products like ammonia. (2017-07-19)

Genetic differences across species guide vocal learning in juvenile songbirds
Juvenile birds discriminate and selectively learn their own species' songs even when primarily exposed to the songs of other species, but the underlying mechanism has remained unknown. A new study, by researchers at Uppsala University, shows that song discrimination arises due to genetic differences between species, rather than early learning or other mechanisms. The results are published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2017-06-12)

Urine test finds what makes people say no to blood pressure lowering pills
University of Manchester researchers together with their UK and overseas collaborators have found out that more than one-third of 1,400 people with high blood pressure have not been taking their blood pressure medication. (2017-05-19)

New biofuel cell with energy storage
Researchers have developed a hybrid of a fuel cell and capacitor on a biocatalytic basis. With the aid of enzymatic processes, what's known as a biosupercapacitor efficiently generates and stores energy. The trick: the enzymes are embedded in a stable polymer gel, which can store a large amount of energy. The scientists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Swedish Malmö University describe their development in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2016-11-15)

Study finds variable accuracy of wrist-worn heart rate monitors
In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Marc Gillinov, M.D., of the Cleveland Clinic, and colleagues assessed the accuracy of four popular wrist-worn heart rate monitors under conditions of varying physical exertion. (2016-10-12)

Mosquito preference for human versus animal biting has genetic basis
Mosquitoes are more likely to feed on cattle than on humans if they carry a specific chromosomal rearrangement in their genome. This reduces their odds of transmitting the malaria parasite, according to a University of California, Davis, study published Sept. 15 in the journal PLOS Genetics. (2016-09-15)

A chromosome anomaly may cause malaria-transmitting mosquito to prefer feeding on cattle
Mosquitoes are more likely to feed on cattle than on humans if they carry a specific chromosomal rearrangement in their genome, reducing their odds of transmitting the malaria parasite, reports Bradley Main at the University of California, Davis in a study published Sept. 12, 2016, in PLOS Genetics. (2016-09-12)

Large investment into brain research at Umeå University
Dr. Anna Rieckmann at Umeå University in Sweden has been awarded an ERC Starting Grant by the European Research Council. The awarded €1.5 million will allow her to spend five years researching the neural basis of cognitive functions. (2016-09-02)

Recharge with sleep: Pediatric sleep recommendations promoting optimal health
For the first time, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine has released official consensus recommendations for the amount of sleep needed to promote optimal health in children and teenagers to avoid the health risks of insufficient sleep. (2016-06-13)

New approach to nuclear structure, freely available
The atomic nucleus is highly complex. Understanding this complexity often requires a tremendous amount of computational power. In a new study published in EPJ A, Susanna Liebig from Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany, and colleagues propose a new approach to nuclear structure calculations. The results are freely available to the nuclear physicists' community so that other groups can perform their own nuclear structure calculations, even if they have only limited computational resources. (2016-06-01)

A new look at caspase 12 research
Inflammasomes are assemblies that are central to inflammatory responses. Dr. Lieselotte Vande Walle, Daniel Jiménez Fernández, colleagues from Professor Mo Lamkanfi's group (VIB/UGent), shed new light on function of caspase 12. They have rid the field of a stubborn dogma, which held that caspase 12 was a negative regulator of inflammasomes. These novel insights pave the way for researchers to break from route of existing research and identify the real physiological functions of caspase 12. (2016-06-01)

Is educational neuroscience a waste of money?
Educational neuroscience has little to offer schools or children's education, according to new research from the University of Bristol, UK. (2016-03-09)

Where is the oil in the gulf? FSU researcher takes a look
A Florida State University researcher and his team have developed a comprehensive analysis of oil in the Gulf of Mexico and determined how much of it occurs naturally and how much came from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill. And more importantly, their data creates a map, showing where the active natural oil seeps are located. (2016-01-25)

Tall and slim: They go together, genetic study shows
University of Queensland scientists have found a genetic basis for height and body mass differences between European populations. (2015-09-14)

Blood and teeth samples accurately predict a criminal's age
Forensic biomedical scientists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have developed a test to predict individuals' age on the basis of blood or teeth samples. This test may be particularly useful for the police, as it can help track down criminals or identify human remains. (2015-09-08)

A clear look at an efficient energy converter
Xiaochun Qin and colleagues have provided a high-resolution crystal structure of a plant protein supercomplex critical to photosynthesis, shedding new light on how this extremely effective solar energy converter achieves its impressive performance. (2015-05-28)

How does evolution work?
Professor Juliette de Meaux from the Botanical Institute of the University of Cologne has received a Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council for her project AdaptoSCOPE, which explores the molecular basis of Darwinian adaptation. The project will run for five years and receive up to 1.6 million euros in funding. (2015-02-11)

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