Current Bci News and Events

Current Bci News and Events, Bci News Articles.
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When strains of E.coli play rock-paper-scissors, it's not the strongest that survives
What happens when different strains of bacteria are present in the same system? Do they co-exist? Do the strongest survive? In a microbial game of rock-paper-scissors, researchers at the University of California San Diego's BioCircuits Institute uncovered a surprising answer. (2020-12-09)

Studies outline key ethical questions surrounding brain-computer interface tech
Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies are no longer hypothetical, yet there are fundamental aspects of the technology that remain unaddressed by both ethicists and policy-makers. Two new papers address these issues by outlining the outstanding ethical issues, offering guidance for addressing those issues, and offering particular insight into the field of BCI tech for cognitive enhancement. (2020-11-10)

JNIS: brain-computer allows patients with severe paralysis to text, email, bank
Researchers demonstrated the success of a fully implantable wireless medical device, the Stentrode™ brain-computer interface (BCI), designed to allow patients with severe paralysis to resume daily tasks -- including texting, emailing, shopping and banking online -- without the need for open brain surgery. The first-in-human study was published in the (i>Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery™, the leading international peer-reviewed journal for the clinical field of neurointerventional surgery. (2020-10-28)

Research lowers errors for using brain signals to control a robot arm
Brain-computer interfaces have seen a large influx of research in an effort to allow precise and accurate control of physical systems. By measuring brain signals and implementing a clever feedback scheme, researchers from India and the UK have reduced the positional error in brain-controlled robot arms by a factor of 10, paving the way to greatly enhancing the quality of life for people suffering from strokes and neuro-muscular disorders. (2020-10-28)

Are brain-computer interface spellers secure?
Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs), which aim to construct a pathway for people to interact with computers directly by thought, have received great attention in recent years. An electroencephalogram-based BCI speller, which allows the user to input text to computer using brain signals, is one of the most popular BCI systems. However, researchers in China show that these BCI spellers can be easily attacked, exposing a critical security concern in EEG-based BCI systems. (2020-10-03)

Meditation for mind-control
Carnegie Mellon Biomedical Engineering Department Head Bin He and his team have discovered that mindful meditation can help subjects learn and improve the ability to mind-control brain computer interfaces (BCIs). (2020-09-23)

First 'plug and play' brain prosthesis demoed in paralyzed person
In a significant advance, researchers working towards a brain-controlled prosthetic limb at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences have shown that machine learning techniques helped a paralyzed individual learn to control a computer cursor using their brain activity without requiring extensive daily retraining, which has been a requirement of all past brain-computer interface (BCI) efforts. (2020-09-07)

Machine learning, meet human emotions: How to help a computer monitor your mental state
An international team of scientists has tested state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms for the challenging tasks of determining the mental workload and affective states of a human brain. Their software can help design smarter brain-computer interfaces for applications in medicine and beyond. In the next steps, researchers plan to use more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) methods, especially deep learning, which allow us to detect very tiny changes in brain signals or brain patterns. (2020-08-19)

How the brain's internal states affect decision-making
By recording the activity of separate populations of neurons simultaneously, researchers have gained an unprecedented insight into how the 'waxing and waning' of our mental state influences the decisions we make. (2020-08-17)

Phantom-limb pain reduced through brain power
Osaka University researchers have used a brain-computer-interface to reduce phantom-limb pain after only three days of training. In a random crossover trial, patients with phantom-limb pain used brain power related to their intact hand to open and close a virtual hand. Reduction in phantom-limb pain after three days of training remained significant five days after training was complete. (2020-07-16)

Unravelling the circuitry that controls cancer growth and spread
Research led by Queen Mary University of London has revealed novel insights into the molecular circuitry controlling cancer cell growth and spread. The findings highlight new pathways involved in these key processes of cancer progression that may represent targets for therapies. (2020-06-23)

Researchers restore injured man's sense of touch using brain-computer interface technology
On April 23 in the journal Cell, a team of researchers report that they have been able to restore sensation to the hand of a research participant with a severe spinal cord injury using a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. The technology harnesses neural signals that are so minuscule they can't be perceived and enhances them via artificial sensory feedback sent back to the participant, resulting in greatly enriched motor function. (2020-04-23)

Stabilizing brain-computer interfaces
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) have published research in Nature Biomedical Engineering that will drastically improve brain-computer interfaces and their ability to remain stabilized during use, greatly reducing or potentially eliminating the need to recalibrate these devices during or between experiments. (2020-04-20)

Brain mapping study suggests motor regions for the hand also connect to the entire body
In a paper publishing March 26 in the journal Cell, investigators report that they have used microelectrode arrays implanted in human brains to map out motor functions down to the level of the single nerve cell. The study revealed that an area believed to control only one body part actually operates across a wide range of motor functions. It also demonstrated how different neurons coordinate with each other. (2020-03-26)

How does an intersex bee behave?
A group of scientists and students working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Barro Colorado Island studied the circadian rhythm of a bee gynandromorph: a rare condition that results in the expression of both male and female characteristics. (2020-03-18)

Surprising beauty found in bacterial cultures
Researchers at University of California San Diego have discovered that when certain microbes pair up, stunning floral patterns emerge. (2020-01-14)

How does your body respond to feelings of moral outrage? It depends on your politics
USC study finds that liberals and conservatives feel moral violations in different areas of their bodies, interpret them as distinct complex feelings and make different moral and political judgments. (2020-01-08)

Brain enlightens the origin of human hand's skill
Dr. Jinung An explores the human brain to discover the origin of 'human hand motor skill.' (2019-11-10)

Can our thoughts alter our brains?
Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) can measure changes in electrical brain activity that just by thinking about performing a task. These changes can be converted into signals via machine learning, which can operate a computer or a prosthesis. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences and TU Berlin demonstrated that after just one hour's training with a BCI there were significant changes in the brain's structure and function. (2019-11-07)

Imagined movements can alter our brains
Brain-computer interfaces have a structural impact on brain substance. (2019-11-07)

How your brain remembers motor sequences
Researchers at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Japan, and Western University, Canada, have succeeded in visualizing how information is represented in a widespread area in the human cerebral cortex during a performance of skilled finger movement sequences. The results uncovered the first detailed map of cortical sequence representation in the human brain. (2019-08-28)

First-ever successful mind-controlled robotic arm without brain implants
A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University has made a breakthrough in the field of noninvasive robotic device control. Using a noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI), researchers have developed the first-ever successful mind-controlled robotic arm exhibiting the ability to continuously track and follow a computer cursor. (2019-06-19)

Research moves closer to brain-machine interface autonomy
A University of Houston biomedical engineer reports in eNeuro that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons. The work represents a significant step forward for prosthetics that perform more naturally. (2019-06-11)

Pitt and CMU researchers discover how the brain changes when mastering a new skill
Researchers have discovered what happens in the brain as people learn how to perform tasks, which could lead to improved lives for people with brain injuries. The study, led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University, revealed that new neural activity patterns emerge with long-term learning and established a causal link between these patterns and new behavioral abilities. (2019-06-10)

Neurofeedback gets you back in the zone
Columbia Engineering researchers have shown--for the first time--that they can use online neurofeedback to modify an individual's arousal state to improve performance in a demanding sensory motor task, such as flying a plane or driving in suboptimal conditions. (2019-03-12)

Brain-computer interface enables people with paralysis to control tablet devices
Three clinical trial participants with paralysis chatted with family and friends, shopped online and used other tablet computer applications, all by just thinking about pointing and clicking a mouse. (2018-11-21)

Reading the motor intention from brain activity within 100ms
A study by Tokyo Tech researchers has developed a new technique to decode motor intention of humans from Electroencephalography. This technique is motivated by the well documented ability of the brain to predict sensory outcomes of self-generated and imagined actions utilizing so called forward models. The method enabled for the first time, nearly 90% single trial decoding accuracy across tested subjects, within 96 ms of the stimulation, with zero user training, and with no additional cognitive load on the users. (2018-08-03)

A dual-therapy approach to boost motor recovery after a stroke
EPFL scientists have shown that combining a brain-computer interface (BCI) with functional electrical stimulation (FES) can help stroke victims recover greater use of their paralyzed arm -- even years after the stroke. (2018-06-20)

Social media posts may signal whether a protest will become violent
The study also finds that people are more likely to condone using violence to defend their beliefs when they think others share their moral values. (2018-05-23)

Brain-computer interface based on mutual learning helps tetraplegics in avatar race
Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are seen as a potential means by which severely physically impaired individuals can regain control of their environment, but establishing such an interface is not trivial. A study publishing May 10 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by a group of researchers at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Geneva, Switzerland, suggests the most dramatic improvements in computer-augmented performance are likely to occur when both human and machine are allowed to learn. (2018-05-10)

New CMU and Pitt research finds the brain is less flexible than we thought when learning
Nobody really knows how the activity in your brain reorganizes as you learn new tasks, but new research from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh reveals that the brain has various mechanisms and constraints by which it reorganizes its neural activity when learning over the course of a few hours. The new research finds that, when learning a new task, the brain is less flexible than previously thought. (2018-03-12)

First comparison of common breast cancer tests finds varied accuracy of predictions
Commercially available prognostic breast cancer tests show significant variation in their abilities to predict disease recurrence, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London of nearly 800 postmenopausal women. (2018-02-15)

Bats as barometer of change
Bats spend every night hard at work for local farmers, consuming over half of their own weight in insects, many of which are harmful agricultural pests, such as the noctuid moths, corn earworm and fall armyworm. And now they are arriving earlier in the season, and some of them are reluctant to leave. It seems the bats know more about climate change than we had realized. (2018-02-12)

Drug improves PTSD traits in rat model of explosive blasts
Male rats exposed to air blasts designed to mimic those from explosives used in recent military conflicts have symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that are improved by a drug currently being evaluated in humans for treatment-resistant depression and suicidal tendencies. The research, published in eNeuro, provides a new direction for addressing the mental health problems that often arise following a common brain injury in veterans. (2018-01-29)

People with tetraplegia gain rapid use of brain-computer interface
A new approach to calibrating the pioneering BrainGate brain-computer interface allowed three clinical trial participants with tetraplegia to gain control of a computer cursor after just one simple calibration step. (2018-01-24)

Whole-population testing for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations is cost effective
Screening the entire population for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations, as opposed to just those at high-risk of carrying this mutation, is cost effective and could prevent more ovarian and breast cancers than the current clinical approach, according to research published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2018-01-17)

Blue lighting is scientifically proven to help us relax faster than white lighting after an argument
Researchers from the University of Granada say that blue light accelerates the relaxation process after acute psychosocial stress such as arguing with a friend or when someone pressures you to quickly finish some task. (2017-11-10)

Brain Composer: 'Thinking' melodies onto a musical score
TU Graz researchers develop new brain-computer interface application which allows music to be composed by the power of thought. How this works is shown in the current issue of the journal PLOS ONE. (2017-09-11)

Stroke patient improvement with a brain-computer interface
Australian researchers have shown that it is possible for stroke patients to improve motor function using special training involving connecting brain signals with a computer. (2017-08-30)

Use of brain-computer interface, virtual avatar could help people with gait disabilities
Researchers from the University of Houston have shown for the first time that the use of a brain-computer interface augmented with a virtual walking avatar can control gait, suggesting the protocol may help patients recover the ability to walk after stroke, some spinal cord injuries and certain other gait disabilities. (2017-08-23)

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