Current Beach News and Events

Current Beach News and Events, Beach News Articles.
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Tourism mainly responsible for marine litter on Mediterranean beaches
A study by the ICTA-UAB warns that tourism generates 80% of the marine litter accumulating on the beaches of the Mediterranean islands in summer. For researchers, the global COVID19 pandemic may be an opportunity to rethink the model of sustainable tourism. (2021-02-08)

Stanford: forecasting coastal water quality
Using water samples and environmental data gathered over 48 hours or less, Stanford engineers develop a new predictive technique for forecasting coastal water quality, a critical step in protecting public health and the ocean economy. (2021-01-21)

Geologic history written in garnet sand
Syracuse University researchers probe deep secrets of trapped inclusions in garnet sand from Papua New Guinea (2021-01-14)

Surveys identify relationship between waves, coastal cliff erosion
Researchers have always known that waves were an important part of the cliff erosion process, but they haven't been able to separate the influence of waves and rain before. After decades of debate over the differing roles that both play, new findings provide an opportunity to improve forecasts. (2020-12-28)

A day at the beach helps model how sound moves through coastal areas
At a North Carolina beach, researchers have been poking and prodding the sand to study how moisture levels affect sounds as they move across the environment. Over short distances, even moderately wet sand reflects sound more like water does than as a solid surface does. Faith Cobb and her team are looking into if the same is true for long-range sound propagation. Their findings will be presented as a part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-10)

New program for African American couples leads to stronger relationships, improved health
For individuals looking to improve their health in 2021, strengthening your couple relationship may be part of the answer, according to findings from a recent University of Illinois study. The study examined long-term changes in partners' health after participating in a new program for two-parent African American families. (2020-12-09)

Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture. As an adult, that's not hard to do. But a new study shows that, even when told to pay attention to the mountain, preschool children focus so much on the cat that they won't later recognize the same mountain. (2020-11-30)

Smaller earthquakes "with ambition" produce the most ground shaking
An earthquake of magnitude 8.0 or larger will almost always cause strong shaking, but a new study suggests that smaller earthquakes--those around magnitude 5.5 or so--are the cause of most occurrences of strong shaking at a 60-kilometer (37-mile) distance. (2020-11-04)

Sea turtle nesting season winding down in Florida, some numbers are up and it's unexpected
Florida's sea turtle nesting surveying comes to a close on Halloween and like everything else in 2020, the season was a bit weird. The number of green sea turtle nests on central and southern Brevard County, Florida beaches monitored by University of Central biologists were way up during a year they should have been down based on nearly 40 years of historical data. (2020-10-28)

Coastal permafrost more susceptible to climate change than previously thought
Research led by Micaela Pedrazas, who earned her masters at The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences working with Professor Bayani Cardenas, has found permafrost to be mostly absent throughout the shallow seafloor along a coastal field site in northeastern Alaska. That means carbon can be released from coastline sources much more easily than previously thought. (2020-10-23)

Diagnosing Parkinson's disease with skin samples could lead to earlier detection
New research shows a simple skin test can accurately identify Parkinson's disease, which could lead to earlier detection of the disease and better outcomes for patients. Currently, Parkinson's disease is diagnosed by clinical signs and symptoms but only definitively diagnosed at autopsy. The researchers conducted a blinded study of 50 skin samples using an assay originally designed to detect mad cow disease. (2020-10-21)

Tracking sea turtle egg traffickers with GPS-enabled decoy eggs
By placing 3D-printed and GPS-enabled decoy sea turtle eggs into nests on the beach, it's possible to gather key evidence needed to expose rampant illegal trade of the eggs, suggests a study publishing in the journal Current Biology on October 5, 2020. The researchers specifically tested how well the decoy eggs work and their safety for the endangered turtles. (2020-10-05)

Ice Age manatees may have called Texas home
Manatees don't live year-round in Texas, but these gentle sea cows are known to occasionally visit, swimming in for a 'summer vacation' and returning to warmer waters for the winter. New research has found fossil evidence for manatees along the Texas coast dating back to the most recent ice age. The discovery raises questions about whether manatees have been visiting for thousands of years, or if ice age manatees once called Texas home. (2020-10-01)

40% of O'ahu, Hawai'i beaches could be lost by mid-century
The reactive and piecemeal approach historically used to manage beaches in Hawai'i has failed to protect them. If policies are not changed, as much as 40% of all beaches on O'ahu, Hawai'i could be lost before mid-century, according to a new study by researchers in the Coastal Geology Group at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. (2020-09-21)

Animals' magnetic 'sixth' sense may come from bacteria, new paper suggests
A University of Central Florida researcher is co-author of a new paper that may help answer why some animals have a magnetic ''sixth'' sense, such as sea turtles' ability to return to the beach where they were born. The researchers recently authored an article in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B that proposes a hypothesis that the magnetic sense comes from a symbiotic relationship with magnetotactic bacteria. (2020-09-14)

Common sunscreen ingredients prove dangerous for freshwater ecosystems
The results show that long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) filters--including avobenzone, oxybenzone, and octocrylene--is lethal for some organisms living in freshwater environments. One of the largest sources of UV-filter contamination in both marine and freshwater environments is from sunscreen leaching off of the skin while swimming. (2020-09-02)

Failures of Germany's largest cliff coast sensed by seismometers
The ten km long, bright white coast of Germany's largest island, Rügen, is shaped by episodically occurring failures. These failures were typically assumed to happen due to strong rain storms. In a study carried out over more than two years, scientists of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences were able to draw a new and surprisingly detailed picture of coastal cliff failure activity. (2020-08-28)

Clemson doctoral candidate uses rockets to surf the Alaskan sky
Postdoc researcher Rafael Mesquita and a multi-institutional research team documented ''surfer waves'' in the upper atmosphere that create a pipeline of energy between layers in space. (2020-08-11)

"Ample evidence" that Cape Hatteras beach closures benefit birds
The National Park Service (NPS) requested that the American Ornithological Society (AOS) assemble an expert panel to produce an independent report assessing the appropriateness of the current NPS beach management plan for the barrier islands of North Carolina's Cape Hatteras National Seashore. In this new report, AOS finds evidence that, despite complaints from the public, the restrictions on recreational use provide significant benefits for vulnerable beach-nesting birds and sea turtles. (2020-08-06)

IKBFU researchers study the Curonian Spit plants adaptation mechanism
IKBFU Institute of Living Systems biology scientists study protective mechanisms of the Curonian Spit wild plants. The scientists are particularly interested in a beach pea plant (Lathyrus maritimus Bigel). (2020-08-05)

NASA puts visible and water vapor eyes on Tropical Storm Isaias
NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible and water vapor imagery as Tropical Storm Isaias continued moving along the east coast of Florida. On Aug. 3, 2020, warnings and watches stretched from Florida to Maine. (2020-08-03)

Walking along blue spaces such as beaches or lakes benefits mental health
Short, frequent walks in blue spaces--areas that prominently feature water, such as beaches, lakes, rivers or fountains -- may have a positive effect on people's well-being and mood, according to a new study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) and published in Environmental Research. (2020-07-06)

Study confirms ultra music festival likely stressful to fish
A new study published in the Journal Environmental Pollution by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that the Ultra Music Festival was likely stressful to toadfish. (2020-07-01)

World's most complete health analysis of nesting sea turtles conducted in Florida
The most comprehensive health assessment for a green turtle rookery in the world to date is providing critical insights into various aspects of physiology, biology, and herpesvirus epidemiology of this nesting population. Findings are hopeful for this population of green sea turtles in southeastern Florida, offer important data on the profile of health for future comparative investigations, and suggest that viruses are endemically stable in this nesting population. (2020-06-16)

Microplastic background pollution in the Curonian Spit beach
An article written by an international team of scientists was published recently in Marine Pollution Bulletin magazine. The team included representatives of the Russian Academy of Sciences Shirshov Institute of Oceanology Atlantic Department, the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, and the Institute of Baltic Sea Research (Warnemunde, Germany) (2020-06-10)

Domestic coastal and marine tourism could contribute to rebooting activity in the sect
NUI Galway's Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU) has released a report that presents estimates of the value of domestic coastal and marine tourism in the Republic of Ireland. (2020-05-21)

Can't touch this! Video shows blacktip sharks use shallow water to flee huge predators
Aerial drone footage provides the first evidence of adult blacktip sharks using shallow waters as a refuge from a huge predator - the great hammerhead. Before this study, documentation of adult sharks swimming in shallower waters to avoid predation did not exist. Unmanned aerial vehicles enable scientists to unobtrusively observe behaviors in the wild, providing insight into seldom-seen predator-prey interactions. When it comes to sharks, this 'hammerhead' time video proves you 'can't touch this.' (2020-05-13)

Litter problem at England's protected coasts
Beaches in or near England's Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have the same levels of litter as those in unprotected areas, new research shows. (2020-04-07)

Tooth be told: Earless seals existed in ancient Australia
A fossilised seal tooth, dating back approximately three million years, found on a Victorian beach proves earless seals existed in Australia in prehistoric times. Known as monachines, the seals became extinct due to rapid changes in sea level. (2020-04-03)

BU astrophysicist and collaborators reveal a new model of our heliosphere
BU astrophysicist and collaborators reveal a new model of our heliosphere that's shaped somewhere in between a croissant and a beach ball. (2020-03-19)

Study suggests LEGO bricks could survive in ocean for up to 1,300 years
By measuring the mass of individual bricks found on beaches against equivalent unused pieces and the age of blocks obtained from storage, researchers estimated that the items could endure for anywhere between 100 and 1,300 years (2020-03-16)

Why do sea turtles eat ocean plastics? New research points to smell
The findings are the first demonstration that the smell of ocean plastics causes animals to eat them. (2020-03-09)

UCF study: Sea level rise impacts to Canaveral sea turtle nests will be substantial
The study examined loggerhead and green sea turtle nests to predict beach habitat loss at four national seashores by the year 2100. When comparing nesting density with beach loss at the sites, they found nesting habitat loss would not be equal. By 2100, Canaveral would lose about 1 percent of its loggerhead habitat; the others will lose approximately 2.5 to 6.7% each. Canaveral's loss is smaller, but the impact greater because of nesting density. (2020-03-04)

Consumers value products more on sunny and snowy days but not when it rains
Weather is an ever-present force in consumers' daily lives, yet there is little marketing research on how it affects consumers and businesses. A new UBC Sauder School of Business study reveals that sunny and snowy conditions trigger consumers to mentally visualize using products associated with the respective weather, which leads to consumers placing a higher value on them. Researchers also found the link between weather and higher product valuation only works for products that are related to being outside. (2020-02-27)

Explained: Why water droplets 'bounce off the walls'
University of Warwick researchers can now explain why some water droplets bounce like a beach ball off surfaces, without ever actually touching them. Now the design and engineering of future droplet technologies can be made more precise and efficient. (2020-02-26)

Sound of music: How melodic alarms could reduce morning grogginess
New research suggests melodic alarms could improve alertness, with harsh alarm tones linked to increased levels of morning grogginess. (2020-02-03)

Upper-plate earthquakes caused uplift along New Zealand's Northern Hikurangi Margin
Earthquakes along a complex series of faults in the upper plate of New Zealand's northern Hikurangi Subduction Margin were responsible for coastal uplift in the region, according to a new evaluation of local marine terraces. (2020-01-28)

Recreational fishers catching more sharks and rays
Recreational fishers are increasingly targeting sharks and rays, a situation that is causing concern among researchers. (2020-01-27)

New study debunks myth of Cahokia's Native American lost civilization
A UC Berkeley archaeologist has dug up ancient human feces, among other demographic clues, to challenge the narrative around the legendary demise of Cahokia, North America's most iconic pre-Columbian metropolis. (2020-01-27)

Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction, PSU study finds
Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new Portland State University study. (2020-01-17)

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