Current Bears News and Events

Current Bears News and Events, Bears News Articles.
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Animal evolution -- glimpses of ancient environments
Zoologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the discovery of a trove of fossil fly larvae, and an intriguing caterpillar, encapsulated in samples of amber that are tens of millions of years old. (2021-02-19)

Wet and wild: There's lots of water in the world's most explosive volcano
Conditions inside the Shiveluch volcano include roughly 10%-14% water by weight (wt%), according to research from Washington University in St. Louis. Most volcanoes have less than 1% water. For subduction zone volcanoes, the average is usually 4%, rarely exceeding 8 wt%, which is considered superhydrous. (2021-01-22)

Alcohols exhibit quantum effects
Skoltech scientists and their colleagues from the Russian Quantum Center revealed a significant role of nuclear quantum effects in the polarization of alcohol in an external electric field. The new research provides insight into the properties of liquid dielectrics. The core assumption of the model pertains to a novel understanding of dielectric polarization phenomena in polar liquids by means of nuclear quantum effects. (2021-01-19)

A new archaeology for the Anthropocene era
Scantily clad tomb raiders and cloistered scholars piecing together old pots - these are the kinds of stereotypes of archaeology that dominate public perception. Yet archaeology in the new millennium is a world away from these images. In a major new report, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History probe a thoroughly modern and scientific discipline to understand how it is helping to address the considerable challenges of the Anthropocene. (2021-01-18)

Cancer cells hibernate like bears to evade harsh chemotherapy
Dr. Catherine O'Brien's study is the first to identify that cancer cells hijack an evolutionary conserved program to survive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the researchers show that novel therapeutic strategies aimed at specifically targeting cancer cells in this slow-dividing state can prevent cancer regrowth. (2021-01-07)

Johns Hopkins Medicine expert weighs devastating impact of COVID-19 on health care workers
During the COVID-19 pandemic, health care workers have been at the forefront of the battle against the life-threatening illness. Sadly, they are not immune to the effects of the disease. Many have contracted COVID-19, and some have died. (2020-12-15)

Possible bittersweet effects of stevia uncovered by Ben-Gurion U. researchers
According to the new study, stevia may disrupt communications between different bacteria in the gut microbiome. While the team found that stevia inhibited these pathways, it did not kill off the bacteria. (2020-12-07)

Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple, scientists say
In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments - home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being. Scientists have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that varies little across the intestinal tract. (2020-11-30)

Scientists map and forecast apex predator populations at unprecedented scale
Findings will help wildlife managers track and predict the dynamics of large carnivore populations. (2020-11-16)

UM research essential to global arctic animal migration archive
Now, scientists can track the movements of thousands of Arctic and sub-Arctic animals over three decades with the new global Arctic Animal Movement Archive. (2020-11-06)

New database shows Arctic animals' changing behavior in face of climate change
Three decades of data on animal migration and movements in the Arctic, tracked through a massive database developed by environmental engineers, shows that animals in one of Earth's coldest regions are shifting their behaviors because of climate change. (2020-11-05)

Archive of animal migration in the Arctic
A global archive with movement data collected across three decades logs changes in the behaviour of Arctic animals (2020-11-05)

New research reports discovery of 5-million-year-old honey badger-like animal
Five million years ago, dangerous carnivores - such as giant wolverines and otters, bears, sabertooth cats, and large hyaenids - prowled the West Coast of South Africa. Today we can confirm that, among them, fearlessly roamed a smaller relative of the living honey badger. (2020-11-02)

Coupling antibiotics with stem cells to fight off bone infections
Researchers from Kanazawa University investigated the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) loaded with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on osteomyelitis caused by implants. By administering ADSC-loaded ciprofloxacin to the site of bone infection in rats, the researchers found a significant improvement of the infection, as shown by reduced soft tissue swelling, abscess formation, and bone degradation. These findings suggest a potential new therapy for implant-related bone infections that have traditionally been difficult to treat with antibiotics. (2020-10-01)

Some polar bears in far north are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice
The small subpopulation of polar bears in Kane Basin were doing better, on average, in recent years than in the 1990s. The bears are experiencing short-term benefits from thinning and shrinking multiyear sea ice that allows more sunlight to reach the ocean surface, which makes the system more ecologically productive. (2020-09-23)

How a giant short-faced bear reached the California Channel Islands
Researchers at the University of Oklahoma, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, University of Oregon, and others report the unexpected discovery of an isolated short-faced bear toe bone from California's Channel Islands, presenting a puzzling scenario for how the largest mammalian carnivore to ever walk North America ended up in an island cave. (2020-09-16)

Benefits likely outweigh costs for national monuments in the American west
New peer-reviewed research describes the history of the 1906 Antiquities Act (used to create national monuments), the controversies that have swirled around monument designation, and findings in the peer-reviewed literature about their impacts on surrounding communities. (2020-09-08)

Consumption of products derived from vulnerable wildlife species pervasive in Laos
A new study of wildlife consumption in northern Laos by San Diego Zoo Global researchers found widespread use of products made from sun bears, Asiatic bears and serows--goat-like mammals found throughout Asia--among other vulnerable species. The findings indicate that efforts are needed to reduce the unsustainable harvest of bears and serows, in particular, 'before this demand becomes a significant conservation challenge,' the authors wrote. (2020-07-01)

Researchers discover unknown consumer base for unsustainable bear product use
A team of researchers led by San Diego Zoo Global made an unexpected discovery: the use of bear bile and body parts in traditional remedies consumed by new and pregnant mothers. The use of traditional medicines derived from bear bile and gallbladders by young and expecting mothers for ailments related to pregnancy had not been previously documented. With populations of wildlife -- including bears -- in decline across Southeast Asia, understanding this large consumer base could inform conservation efforts in the region. (2020-06-29)

Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'
Sledge dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought. In a new study from the QIMMEQ project, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show that ancestors of modern sledge dogs have worked and lived with humans for over 9,500 years. (2020-06-25)

Sunnier but riskier
Conservation efforts that open up the canopy of overgrown habitat for threatened timber rattlesnakes are beneficial to snakes but could come at a cost, according to a new study. (2020-06-24)

The Kerguelen oceanic plateau sheds light on the formation of continents
How did the continents form? Although to a certain extent this remains an open question, the oceanic plateau of the Kerguelen Islands may well provide part of the answer, according to a French-Australian team led by the Géosciences Environnement Toulouse laboratory (CNRS/Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier/IRD/CNES). (2020-06-19)

Feeding habits differ by age and sex in Asian black bears: Data may help wildlife experts better manage bears' habitats
A ten-year study shows that Asian black bears' diets vary greatly depending on sex, stage of life, and resource availability, providing important information on foraging strategy according to age-sex classes. Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan published their findings on April 15 in Mammal Study. (2020-06-09)

Mars: Where mud flows like lava
An international research team including recreated martian conditions in a low-pressure chamber to observe the flow of mud. These experiments showed that the mud can behave in the same way as certain lava flows on Earth that are called pahoehoe and are characterised by numerous lobes. (2020-05-18)

Evolutionary adaptation helped cave bears hibernate, but may have caused extinction
A study published in Science Advances reveals a new hypothesis that may explain why European cave bears went extinct during past climate change periods. (2020-04-01)

'Fatal attraction': Small carnivores drawn to kill sites, then ambushed by larger kin
University of Washington researchers have discovered that large predators play a key yet unexpected role in keeping smaller predators and deer in check. Their 'fatal attraction' theory finds that smaller predators are drawn to the kill sites of large predators by the promise of leftover scraps, but the scavengers may be killed themselves if their larger kin return for seconds. (2020-03-18)

Actively engaging local people could make grizzly conservation policies more bearable
Western Canada hosts a significant portion of North America's grizzly bears, and declining bear numbers have led to various conservation efforts. However, conservation policies frequently cause controversy. A new study examining the perspectives of local officials and residents in Alberta, Canada, suggests that locals feel excluded from decision-making processes underlying conservation policy, and have practical concerns with its implementation. Involving local people in designing conservation projects could help avoid such frustrations. (2020-03-11)

When it comes to conservation, ditch the 'canary in the coal mine'
With habitat loss threatening the extinction of an ever-growing number of species around the world, many wildlife advocates and conservation professionals rely on the proverbial 'canary in the coal mine'--monitoring and protecting a single representative species--to maintain healthy wildlife biodiversity. But new research from UBC's Okanagan campus suggests that habitats are better served if conservation efforts focus on a collection of species rather than a single 'canary.' (2020-02-25)

Shrinking sea ice is creating an ecological trap for polar bears
The decision of each individual bear to stay on the ice or to move to land appears to be linked to the energetic cost or benefit of either option, and the potential of having to swim to reach land. (2020-02-25)

Polar bears in Baffin Bay skinnier, having fewer cubs due to less sea ice
Satellite tracking of adult females and visual monitoring of polar bears in Baffin Bay show changes from the 1990s to the period from 2009 to 2015. Bears in Baffin Bay are getting thinner and adult females are having fewer cubs than when sea ice was more available. (2020-02-12)

Does news coverage of crashes affect perceived blame?
Despite an ever-rising number of pedestrian and bicyclist deaths on US roads each year, there's no widespread public pressure to improve road safety -- a situation influenced by how news articles about auto-pedestrian/bicyclist crashes are written, said Tara Goddard, Texas A&M assistant professor of urban planning. (2020-01-28)

Plane travel destroys polar bear habitat
A group of polar bear researchers wants you to do more than worry about the fate of these beautiful animals. They've calculated how much summer sea ice is melted per metric ton of CO2 emissions. Then you can decide if the flight you're planning to take is worth destroying polar bear habitat. (2020-01-23)

Learning from the bears
Grizzly bears spend many months in hibernation, but their muscles do not suffer from the lack of movement. In the journal 'Scientific Reports', a team led by MDC researcher Michael Gotthardt reports on how they manage to do this. The grizzly bears' strategy could help prevent muscle atrophy in humans as well. (2019-12-30)

Asian black bears' smart strategy for seasonal energy balance
A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered that daily energy balance of Asian black bears exhibited seasonal change with a twin-peak pattern: up in spring, down to the lowest point in summer, and up again in autumn. From spring to summer, the energy balance is surprisingly negative. Interestingly, bears obtain about 80% of the energy they need in a year by eating acorns in autumn. (2019-12-23)

Falcons see prey at speed of Formula 1 car
Extremely acute vision and the ability to rapidly process different visual impressions -- these 2 factors are crucial when a peregrine falcon bears down on its prey at a speed that easily matches that of a Formula 1 racing car: Over 350 kilometers per hour. (2019-12-20)

Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon
A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon. Most of these bears, also known as grizzlies, are dipping into small streams to capture their iconic prey. (2019-12-19)

Why are giant pandas born so tiny?
Born pink, blind, and helpless, giant pandas typically weigh about 100 grams at birth -- the equivalent of a stick of butter. Their mothers are 900 times more massive than that. That raises a question that has vexed biologists: why the disparity? No one knows the answer, but by comparing bone growth across newborn bears, dogs and other animals, scientists find that one idea doesn't hold up. (2019-12-13)

Why polar bears at sea have higher pollution levels than those staying on land
As the climate changes, myriad animal populations are being impacted. In particular, Arctic sea-ice is in decline, causing polar bears in the Barents Sea region to alter their feeding and hunting habits. Bears that follow sea-ice to offshore areas have higher pollutant levels than those staying on land -- but why? A new study in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology reports the likely reasons. (2019-12-11)

Study of elephant, capybara, human hair finds that thicker hair isn't always stronger
Despite being four times thicker than human hair, elephant hair is only half as strong -- that's just one finding from researchers studying the hair strength of many different mammals. Their work, appearing in a paper publishing Dec. 11 in the journal Matter, shows that thin hair tends to be stronger than thick hair because of the way that it breaks. (2019-12-11)

Details of dental wear revealed
The teeth of mammals experience constant wear. However, the details of these wear processes are largely unknown. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now demonstrated that the various areas of herbivores' teeth differ in how susceptible they are to dental wear, detailing an exact chronology. (2019-10-08)

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