Current Beetle News and Events

Current Beetle News and Events, Beetle News Articles.
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How location dictates biological clocks of species: Study in beetles offers new insights
Biological clocks are ubiquitous in living organisms and govern their behavioral pattern, from sleep-wake cycle to reproduction. Although they are well-understood, how they differ based on geographic location is unclear. In a new study, scientists from Japan report variations in the biological clocks of red flour beetles across the country, offering new insights into how they work. (2021-02-18)

Breakthrough in the fight against spruce bark beetles
For the first time, a research team led by Lund University in Sweden has mapped out exactly what happens when spruce bark beetles use their sense of smell to find trees and partners to reproduce with. The hope is that the results will lead to better pest control and protection of the forest in the future. (2021-02-16)

Combined bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire spell uncertain future for forests
Bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire alone are not a death sentence for Colorado's beloved forests--but when combined, their toll may become more permanent, shows new research from the University of Colorado Boulder. (2021-02-08)

Size matters: How the size of a male's weapons affects its anti-predator tactics
When males have to fight for reproductive rights, having larger weapons such as horns gives them an edge. However, this can also limit their mobility, making them more vulnerable to predators. In a recent study, scientists from Japan proved, for the first time, that males of a species adopt different anti-predator tactics--tonic immobility or escape--based on the size of their weapons, opening doors to a better understanding of the evolution of animal behaviors. (2021-01-28)

Mechanism that produces rapid acceleration in clicking beetles identified
Snap-through unbending movement of the body is the main reason for the clicking beetle's fast acceleration. (2021-01-21)

Beetles reveal how to hide the body
A corpse is a home to the burying beetle, and UConn researchers are learning how this specialist critter keeps its home free of unwanted visitors. (2021-01-20)

Latch, load and release: Elastic motion makes click beetles click, study finds
Click beetles can propel themselves more than 20 body lengths into the air, and they do so without using their legs. While the jump's motion has been studied in depth, the physical mechanisms that enable the beetles' signature clicking maneuver have not. A new study examines the forces behind this super-fast energy release and provides guidelines for studying extreme motion, energy storage and energy release in other small animals like trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimps. (2021-01-18)

Unsure how to help reverse insect declines? Scientists suggest simple ways
Entomologist Akito Kawahara's message is straightforward: We can't live without insects. They're in trouble. And there's something all of us can do to help. (2021-01-12)

Master of disguise is new genus and species of cylindrical bark beetle
A resemblance to moss, lichens and fungi made for fantastic cover by a new genus and species of cylindrical bark beetle described by an Oregon State University College of Science researcher. (2021-01-11)

Discovery: How Colorado potato beetles beat pesticides
New research shows that pesticides alter how Colorado potato beetles manage their DNA. These epigenetic changes were passed down two generations suggesting that rapid resistance to pesticides may not require beetles to evolve their genetic code. Instead they may simply use existing genes to tolerate toxins already found in potatoes. The scientists were surprised that these epigenetic changes, triggered by tiny doses of pesticide, were maintained through multiple rounds of sexual reproduction. (2020-12-21)

NYUAD researchers shed new light on mysteries behind the light emission of fireflies
A team of researchers from the NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) Smart Materials Lab (SML) led by Professor of Chemistry Panče Naumov has conducted a thorough review of the scientific literature surrounding the natural production of light, called bioluminescence, and developed conclusions that will help others in the field direct their research to uncover the mysteries behind this fascinating natural phenomenon. (2020-12-10)

"Helper" ambrosia beetles share reproduction with their mother
A new study shows for the first time that Xyleborus affinis beetles are cooperative breeders, where females disperse to found new nests or stay to help their mother raise siblings, while also reproducing themselves. They grow an asexual Raffaella fungus alongside their nest galleries, apparently their only source of food. (2020-11-04)

Beetles cooperate in brood care
Ambrosia beetles are fascinating: they practice agriculture with fungi and they live in a highly developed social system. Biologist Peter Biedermann has now discovered new facts about them. (2020-11-04)

Beetle larvae think with a brain 'under construction'
In human brains, hundreds of billions of nerve cells are interconnected in the most complicated way. This is no different for insects, although their brains 'only' have up to one million nerve cells. To a large extent, the brain develops in the embryo, but in many animals it is completed only after birth. Biologists from Göttingen University found that beetle larvae start using their brains, although still 'under construction'. Results were published in PLOS Biology. (2020-11-01)

Soil fungi act like a support network for trees, study shows
University of Alberta research is first to show that growth rate of adult trees is linked to fungal networks colonizing their roots. (2020-10-22)

The effects of wildfires and spruce beetle outbreaks on forest temperatures
Results from a study published in the Journal of Biogeography indicate that wildfires may play a role in accelerating climate-driven species changes in mountain forests by compounding regional warming trends. (2020-10-21)

UCI materials scientists discover design secrets of nearly indestructible insect
Materials science researchers at the University of California, Irvine conducted a nanoscopic examination of the diabolical ironclad beetle, a species native to the Southwestern US, to learn what makes it so tough and crush resistant. Their results are the subject of a new study in Nature. (2020-10-21)

This beetle can survive getting run over by a car. Engineers are figuring out how.
Getting run over by a car is not a near-death experience for the diabolical ironclad beetle. How the beetle survives could inspire the development of new materials with the same herculean toughness, engineers show in a paper published Wednesday (Oct. 21) in Nature. (2020-10-21)

Bark beetle outbreaks benefit wild bee populations, habitat
Researchers found significant increases in floral abundance and wild bee diversity in outbreak-affected forests, compared to similar, undisturbed forest. (2020-10-15)

University of Guam part of international effort to understand cycad pollinators
The Guam team's 2017 discovery of the new Cycadophila samara beetle and its pollination of cycads is now contributing to an international effort to more fully understand the intimate relationship between plant and insect. (2020-10-13)

Scientists reconstruct beetles from the Cretaceous
An international research team led by the University of Bonn (Germany) and Palacky University (Czech Republic) has examined four newly found specimens of the Mysteriomorphidae beetle using computer tomography and has been able to reconstruct them. The results allow to draw conclusions about the evolution of the species during the Cretaceous period. The study has been published in the journal ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-10-08)

Coconut rhinoceros beetle makes unexpected 'host shift' to Guam's cycad trees
Researchers at the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam have documented what biologists call a ''host shift'' of the coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam. The beetle, first documented as an invasive species in Guam in 2007, has been devastating the island's ubiquitous coconut trees and is now also burrowing into Guam's endangered native cycad tree, Cycas micronesica. (2020-09-16)

Species competition and cooperation influence vulnerability to climate change
Organisms need to work together to adapt to climate change, especially in the presence of competitors, suggests a new study published today in eLife. (2020-08-18)

An insect species can actively escape from the vents of predators via the digestive system
Some prey species can escape from inside a predator after a successful attack. Kobe University ecologist Sugiura Shinji has found that the aquatic beetle Regimbartia attenuata can actively escape from the vent of the frog Pelophylax nigromaculatus via the digestive system. This is the first time that research has documented the active escape of prey from the body of a predator after being eaten. (2020-08-03)

Where are arctic mosquitoes most abundant in Greenland and why?
Bzz! It's mosquito season in Greenland. June and July is when Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) are in peak abundance, buzzing about the tundra. While Arctic mosquitoes serve as an important food source to other animals, they are notorious for their role as pests to humans and wildlife. Yet, these mosquitoes spend most of their lives in an aquatic environment in shallow, tundra ponds. A Dartmouth study finds that Arctic mosquito populations appear to be driven by food quality rather than predator density. (2020-07-23)

A new species of darkling beetle larvae that degrade plastic
POSTECH Professor Hyung Joon Cha's research team confirms biodegradation of polystyrene using darkling beetle larvae found in Korea. (2020-07-20)

Pine beetles successful no matter how far they roam -- with devastating effects
Whether they travel only a few metres or tens of kilometres to a new host tree, female pine beetles use different strategies to find success--with major negative consequences for pine trees, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2020-07-16)

Undergraduate student discovers 18 new species of aquatic beetle in South America
Rachel Smith has published a description of 18 new species of aquatic water beetle from the genus Chasmogenus in the peer-reviewed journal ZooKeys. (2020-06-22)

How the beetle got its bang
Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J. show how the bombardier beetle concocts its deadly explosives and in the process, learn how evolution gave rise to the beetle's remarkable firepower. (2020-06-16)

Versatile symbionts: Reed beetles benefit from bacterial helpers through all life stages
Researchers have investigated the contributions that symbiotic bacteria make to the unusual life cycle and diet of reed beetles. (2020-06-12)

CABI confirms presence of devastating date pest the red palm weevil on Socotra Island
CABI scientist Dr Arne Witt has led an international team of researchers who have confirmed for the first time the presence of the date pest red palm weevil on Socotra Island, Yemen, putting the livelihoods of residents at risk. The researchers say more surveys are needed to determine the exact distribution of the palm pest on Socotra and what impact current invasions are having on date production. (2020-06-11)

Superworms digest plastic, with help from their bacterial sidekicks
Resembling giant mealworms, superworms (Zophobas atratus) are beetle larvae that are often sold in pet stores as feed for reptiles, fish and birds. In addition to their relatively large size (about 2 inches long), these worms have another superpower: They can degrade polystyrene plastic. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have linked this ability to a strain of bacteria that lives in the larvae's gut. (2020-05-27)

Scientists find genes to save ash trees from deadly beetle
An international team of scientists have identified candidate resistance genes that could protect ash trees from the emerald ash borer (EAB), a deadly pest that is expected to kill billions of trees worldwide. (2020-05-25)

Parasitic wasp discovery offers chemical-free pest control for growers
A species of parasitic wasp discovered by chance could provide growers with a chemical-free way of controlling a major pest. (2020-05-22)

Peculiar behavior of the beetle Toramus larvae
When studying the larval morphology of Toramini (Coleoptera: Erotylidae) we found that larvae of the genus Toramus attach their exuviae to their distal abdomen, with each exuvia from the preceding instar attached to the next to form a vertical pile. Exuvial attachment is facilitated by modified hook-like setae with flattened shafts inserted into the exuvia of the previous instar. We discuss the possibility that the exuvial attachment serves as a kind of autotomy -- ''exuvial autotomy''. (2020-05-21)

True colors: Using X-rays to trace the evolution of insects' structural colors
A team of researchers has used ultra-bright X-rays to analyze 13,000-year-old fossilized beetle wings to learn more about the evolution of structural colors. (2020-05-15)

Light sensors detect larval pests munching on date palms
Optical fibers wrapped around date palm trunks could help detect this tree's most destructive pest early enough to save it. (2020-05-06)

Humble bug holds key to relieving millions of allergy sufferers in Europe
Dr. Urs Schaffner, lead author of study in Nature Communications, says the leaf beetle Ophraella communa can significantly reduce pollen -- which causes a range of symptoms from sneezing to itchy eyes and aggravates conditions such as asthma and eczema -- from common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). The interdisciplinary study -- the first to quantify the economic benefits of biological control in Europe -- also argues that the costs inflicted by invasive species in Europe are 'most probably seriously underestimated.' (2020-04-21)

Got seasonal allergies? Beetles could help
Allergies caused by the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, impact millions, and in Europe alone, around 13.5 million people suffer with symptoms, resulting in 7.4 billion Euros worth of health costs per year, according to the research. The study suggests the leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, could reduce the number of people affected by the pollen and the associated economic impacts, since the beetle -- itself a recent arrival in Europe -- loves to munch on the invasive plant. (2020-04-21)

Rare South American ground beetles sport unusual, likely multi-purpose antennal cleaners
After 157 years since the description of the South American genus of strange-combed beetles, Nototylus, a second specimen finally has been discovered. Published in the open-access scholarly journal ZooKeys as a species new to science, the beetle comes to address some over a century-old debates, including whether or not strange-combed beetles possess a feature distinct for ground beetles, why that might be, and whether or not they are indeed ground beetles at all. (2020-04-20)

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