Current Beetles News and Events

Current Beetles News and Events, Beetles News Articles.
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Mechanism that produces rapid acceleration in clicking beetles identified
Snap-through unbending movement of the body is the main reason for the clicking beetle's fast acceleration. (2021-01-21)

Beetles reveal how to hide the body
A corpse is a home to the burying beetle, and UConn researchers are learning how this specialist critter keeps its home free of unwanted visitors. (2021-01-20)

Latch, load and release: Elastic motion makes click beetles click, study finds
Click beetles can propel themselves more than 20 body lengths into the air, and they do so without using their legs. While the jump's motion has been studied in depth, the physical mechanisms that enable the beetles' signature clicking maneuver have not. A new study examines the forces behind this super-fast energy release and provides guidelines for studying extreme motion, energy storage and energy release in other small animals like trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimps. (2021-01-18)

Master of disguise is new genus and species of cylindrical bark beetle
A resemblance to moss, lichens and fungi made for fantastic cover by a new genus and species of cylindrical bark beetle described by an Oregon State University College of Science researcher. (2021-01-11)

Discovery: How Colorado potato beetles beat pesticides
New research shows that pesticides alter how Colorado potato beetles manage their DNA. These epigenetic changes were passed down two generations suggesting that rapid resistance to pesticides may not require beetles to evolve their genetic code. Instead they may simply use existing genes to tolerate toxins already found in potatoes. The scientists were surprised that these epigenetic changes, triggered by tiny doses of pesticide, were maintained through multiple rounds of sexual reproduction. (2020-12-21)

Miniature guttural toads on Mauritius and Réunion stun researchers
Researchers from the DSI/NRF Center for Invasion Biology at Stellenbosch University in South Africa have found that, scarcely a hundred years after Guttural Toads were introduced to the islands of Mauritius and Réunion, their overall body size has been reduced by up to a third compared to their counterparts in South Africa. (2020-12-08)

"Helper" ambrosia beetles share reproduction with their mother
A new study shows for the first time that Xyleborus affinis beetles are cooperative breeders, where females disperse to found new nests or stay to help their mother raise siblings, while also reproducing themselves. They grow an asexual Raffaella fungus alongside their nest galleries, apparently their only source of food. (2020-11-04)

Beetles cooperate in brood care
Ambrosia beetles are fascinating: they practice agriculture with fungi and they live in a highly developed social system. Biologist Peter Biedermann has now discovered new facts about them. (2020-11-04)

This beetle can survive getting run over by a car. Engineers are figuring out how.
Getting run over by a car is not a near-death experience for the diabolical ironclad beetle. How the beetle survives could inspire the development of new materials with the same herculean toughness, engineers show in a paper published Wednesday (Oct. 21) in Nature. (2020-10-21)

Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change
New research shows that as species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change. (2020-10-19)

Bark beetle outbreaks benefit wild bee populations, habitat
Researchers found significant increases in floral abundance and wild bee diversity in outbreak-affected forests, compared to similar, undisturbed forest. (2020-10-15)

University of Guam part of international effort to understand cycad pollinators
The Guam team's 2017 discovery of the new Cycadophila samara beetle and its pollination of cycads is now contributing to an international effort to more fully understand the intimate relationship between plant and insect. (2020-10-13)

A new species of Darwin wasp from Mexico named in observance of the 2020 quarantine period
Scientists at the Autonomous University of Tamaulipas in Mexico recently discovered five new species of parasitoid wasps in Mexico, but the name of one of them is quite striking: covida. Described in a new paper, published in the peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal ZooKeys, the new to science Darwin wasp was identified during the 2020 global quarantine period, imposed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-10-08)

Scientists reconstruct beetles from the Cretaceous
An international research team led by the University of Bonn (Germany) and Palacky University (Czech Republic) has examined four newly found specimens of the Mysteriomorphidae beetle using computer tomography and has been able to reconstruct them. The results allow to draw conclusions about the evolution of the species during the Cretaceous period. The study has been published in the journal ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-10-08)

"Immortal" in tree resin
The phenomenon of using DNA from old fossils preserved in amber already inspired Hollywood - in the film Jurassic Park, scientists reproduce the DNA of dinosaurs extracted from a fossil mosquito and thereby resurrect them. In reality, however, all previous studies in which researchers took DNA samples from insects enclosed in tree resin were useless under the scientific method. Researchers now detected DNA from ambrosia beetles that were trapped in recent tree resin. (2020-09-30)

Halt post-disturbance logging in forests
Please do not disturb: After forest fires, bark beetle infestations and other damage, the affected forests should not be cleared. (2020-09-23)

Natural pest control saving billions
Biological control of insect pests - where 'natural enemies' keep pests at bay - is saving farmers in Asia and the Pacific billions of dollars, according to University of Queensland-led research. Dr Kris Wyckhuys from UQ's School of Biological Sciences said biological control involved the careful release of an exotic natural enemy from a pest's native habitat. (2020-09-03)

Species competition and cooperation influence vulnerability to climate change
Organisms need to work together to adapt to climate change, especially in the presence of competitors, suggests a new study published today in eLife. (2020-08-18)

Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology. (2020-08-13)

An insect species can actively escape from the vents of predators via the digestive system
Some prey species can escape from inside a predator after a successful attack. Kobe University ecologist Sugiura Shinji has found that the aquatic beetle Regimbartia attenuata can actively escape from the vent of the frog Pelophylax nigromaculatus via the digestive system. This is the first time that research has documented the active escape of prey from the body of a predator after being eaten. (2020-08-03)

Pine beetles successful no matter how far they roam -- with devastating effects
Whether they travel only a few metres or tens of kilometres to a new host tree, female pine beetles use different strategies to find success--with major negative consequences for pine trees, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2020-07-16)

Undergraduate student discovers 18 new species of aquatic beetle in South America
Rachel Smith has published a description of 18 new species of aquatic water beetle from the genus Chasmogenus in the peer-reviewed journal ZooKeys. (2020-06-22)

How sexual competition and choice could protect species from extinction
New research shows that removing sexual competition and choice through enforced monogamy creates populations that are less resilient to environmental stress, such as climate change. The research team looked at how flour beetles coped with environmental and genetic stress after they had evolved under monogamous versus polyandrous mating patterns. The researchers say that their findings should apply to any species that reproduces sexually, experiences some degree of sexual selection, and faces environmental stress. (2020-06-18)

How the beetle got its bang
Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J. show how the bombardier beetle concocts its deadly explosives and in the process, learn how evolution gave rise to the beetle's remarkable firepower. (2020-06-16)

Versatile symbionts: Reed beetles benefit from bacterial helpers through all life stages
Researchers have investigated the contributions that symbiotic bacteria make to the unusual life cycle and diet of reed beetles. (2020-06-12)

Disjunct distribution across the equator
Podonychus gyobu sp. nov., a second species of the genus Podonychus Jäch & Kodada, 1997, hitherto known only to inhabit Indonesia, is reported to have been found in Kyushu, Japan. The endophallic structures and the larva of P. gyobu sp. nov. are described. (2020-06-08)

Alien frog invasion wreaks havoc on natural habitat
Indiscriminate feeding by an alien population of the carnivorous spotted-thighed frog -- could severely affect the native biodiversity of southern Australia according to a new study by the University of South Australia. (2020-06-04)

Scientists reveal new fundamental principles governing diving in animals
An international team of scientists has examined how metabolic constraints govern the diving performance of air-breathing aquatic species, all of which have evolved to maximise the amount of time they can spend underwater (2020-05-26)

Parasitic wasp discovery offers chemical-free pest control for growers
A species of parasitic wasp discovered by chance could provide growers with a chemical-free way of controlling a major pest. (2020-05-22)

Peculiar behavior of the beetle Toramus larvae
When studying the larval morphology of Toramini (Coleoptera: Erotylidae) we found that larvae of the genus Toramus attach their exuviae to their distal abdomen, with each exuvia from the preceding instar attached to the next to form a vertical pile. Exuvial attachment is facilitated by modified hook-like setae with flattened shafts inserted into the exuvia of the previous instar. We discuss the possibility that the exuvial attachment serves as a kind of autotomy -- ''exuvial autotomy''. (2020-05-21)

Rare South American ground beetles sport unusual, likely multi-purpose antennal cleaners
After 157 years since the description of the South American genus of strange-combed beetles, Nototylus, a second specimen finally has been discovered. Published in the open-access scholarly journal ZooKeys as a species new to science, the beetle comes to address some over a century-old debates, including whether or not strange-combed beetles possess a feature distinct for ground beetles, why that might be, and whether or not they are indeed ground beetles at all. (2020-04-20)

Lacustrine ecosystems needed 10 million years to recover after end-permian mass extinction
A research team led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) found that both lake and peat-forming forest ecosystems probably took as long as 10 million years to recover after the end-Permian mass extinction. (2020-04-03)

Beetles changed their diet during the Cretaceous period
Like a snapshot, amber preserves bygone worlds. An international team of paleontologists from the University of Bonn has now described four new beetle species in fossilized tree resin from Myanmar, which belong to the Kateretidae family. As well as the about 99 million years old insects, the amber also includes pollen. It seems that the beetles helped the flowering plants to victory, because they contributed to their propagation. (2020-03-18)

Common anti-parasite treatments used on cattle have devastating impacts on wildlife
Experts have stressed an urgent need to find alternatives to wormers and anti-ectoparasitic products used widely on cattle, following the findings of a study just published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. (2020-03-17)

Love rivals risk having offspring with a greater number of harmful mutations
Males that face tougher competition for females risk having offspring with a greater number of harmful mutations in their genome than males without rivals. Researchers at Uppsala University have discovered this correlation in the beetle species Callosobruchus maculatus. Their study is published in the scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-03-16)

Older beetle parents 'less flexible'
Older parents are less flexible when it comes to raising their offspring, according to a new study of beetles. (2020-03-06)

Whether horseradish flea beetles deter predators depends on their food plant and their life stage
Horseradish flea beetles use glucosinolates from their host plants for their own defense. They have an enzyme which converts glucosinolates into toxic mustard oils. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, found that while glucosinolates are present in all life stages of the beetle, the enzyme required to convert these into toxic substances is not always active. Although larvae fend off attackers, pupae are predated because they lack enzyme activity. (2020-03-02)

Exceptional catapulting jump mechanism in a tiny beetle could be applied in robotic limbs
The fascinating and highly efficient jumping mechanism in flea beetles is described in a new research article in the open-access journal ZooKeys. Despite having been known since 1929, the explosive jump has not been fully understood. Recently, a team of Chinese and US scientists joined forces to test the existing theories, using micro-computed tomography, 3D reconstructions, high-speed filming and dissection. The team also proposed a design of a bionic limb inspired by their findings. (2020-02-25)

The dangers facing fireflies
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2020-02-24)

Forests bouncing back from beetles, but elk and deer slowing recovery
New research from University of Colorado Boulder reveals that even simultaneous bark beetle outbreaks are not a death sentence to the state's beloved forests. The study, published this month in the journal Ecology, found that high-elevation forests in the southern Rocky Mountains actually have a good chance of recovery, even after overlapping outbreaks with different kinds of beetles. One thing that is slowing their recovery down: Foraging elk and deer. (2020-02-13)

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