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Current Behaviour News and Events, Behaviour News Articles.
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First Australian night bees recorded foraging in darkness
Australian bees are known for pollinating plants on beautiful sunny days, but a new study has identified two species that have adapted their vision for night-time conditions for the first time. The study by a team of ecology researchers has observed night time foraging behaviour by a nomiine (Reepenia bituberculata) and masked (Meroglossa gemmata) bee species, with both developing enlarged compound and simple eyes which allow more light to be gathered when compared to their daytime kin. (2020-10-30)

Should I run, or should I not? The neural basis of aggression and flight
Researchers in the Gross group at EMBL Rome have investigated the mechanism behind defensive behaviour in mice. They have identified a specific area of the brain that encodes both spatial and threat cues to drive location-specific defensive responses. (2020-10-29)

Brainstem neurons control both behaviour and misbehaviour
A recent study at the University of Helsinki reveals how gene control mechanisms define the identity of developing neurons in the brainstem. The researchers also showed that a failure in differentiation of the brainstem neurons leads to behavioural abnormalities, including hyperactivity and attention deficit. (2020-10-29)

Unravelling the origins of autoimmune psychosis
Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is an autoimmune brain illness that is often mistaken by a psychiatric disorder since it causes psychoses and other behaviour alterations. Despite having these similarities, the illness does not respond to common antipsychotic treatments. (2020-10-29)

Nudges fail more often than is reported, experts warn
Research led by Queen Mary University of London has shown that despite the widespread use of behavioural interventions across society, failed interventions are surprisingly common. (2020-10-28)

Judges' decisions in sport focus more on vigour than skill
Researchers from the University of Plymouth analysed almost 550 men's and women's mixed martial arts contests, using data collated for the Ultimate Fighting Championship, and found the rate at which competitors fight is more likely to result in judges awarding victory than the skill with which they attack their opponents. (2020-10-27)

Shifts in flowering phases of plants due to reduced insect density
A research group of the University of Jena and the iDiv has discovered that insects have a decisive influence on the biodiversity and flowering phases of plants. If there is a lack of insects where the plants are growing, their flowering behaviour changes. This can result in the lifecycles of the insects and the flowering periods of the plants no longer coinciding. If the insects seek nectar, some plants will no longer be pollinated. (2020-10-26)

Scientists develop genetic 'monitors' that detect when genes are active
Genetic sensors that can detect the activity from genes, rather than just the genes themselves, have been developed by a team led by University of Warwick scientists. (2020-10-26)

Citizens themselves contribute to political mistrust
People have a special ability to detect and disseminate information about egotistic and selfish leaders. In this way, citizens themselves contribute greatly to the proliferation of voter apathy and mistrust of politicians, according to a new study from Aarhus BSS at Aarhus University. (2020-10-20)

Nanodevices show how living cells change with time, by tracking from the inside
For the first time, scientists have introduced minuscule tracking devices directly into the interior of mammalian cells, giving an unprecedented peek into the processes that govern the beginning of development. (2020-10-20)

HKU physicist joins international effort to unveil the behavior of "strange metals"
An international joint research team including Dr Zi Yang MENG, Associate Professor of Department of Physics at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), has solved the puzzle of the NFL behaviour in interacting electrons systems, and provided a protocol for the establishment of new paradigms in quantum metals, through quantum many-body computation and analytical calculations. The findings have recently been published in Npj Quantum Materials. (2020-10-19)

Lie detection -- Have the experts got it wrong?
Researchers led by the University of Portsmouth carried out a critical analysis of the Model Statement lie detection technique and the results have been published today in the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling. There are concerns that the use of the technique is dangerous in the pursuit of criminal justice and researchers are calling for an urgent review of its practice. (2020-10-15)

Wolves attached - Adult wolves miss their human handler in separation similar to dogs
One key feature of the dog's success is that they show attachment towards their owners. The origin of the ability to form these interspecific bonds is still unclear. It is widely accepted that the common ancestor of the dog and the grey wolf probably was a highly social species, that had an important role during domestication. By studying the dog's closest living relative, the grey wolf, we can have an insight how early domestication process of the dog was affected. (2020-10-14)

STAT3 identified as important factor in emotional reactivity
In a study published in leading journal ''Molecular Psychiatry'', MedUni Vienna researchers led by Daniela Pollak from the Division of Neurophysiology and Neuropharmacology showed that STAT3 plays an important role in the serotonergic system as a molecular mediator for controlling emotional reactivity, thereby establishing a mechanistic link between the immune system, serotonergic transmission and affective disorders such as depression. (2020-10-14)

Online horse race bettors are less keen to gamble after a losing day
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a bettor likely stays away from betting for a 27% longer time after a losing day than after a day on which they won or broke even. The study looked at how losing or winning on the previous betting day predicts how long it takes from a bettor to return to the next session of online horse race betting. (2020-10-14)

Mental accounting is impacting sustainable behavior
Human beings tend to create separate mental budget compartments where specific acts of consumption and payments are linked. This mechanism can be counter-productive when it comes to energy consumption and can have a negative impact on attempts to reduce carbon emissions. Psychologists from the University of Geneva, have linked theories and research on mental accounting to energy and sustainability behaviour, proposing concrete strategies to improve the impact of climate-control measures. (2020-10-13)

The black hole always chirps twice: New clues deciphering the shape of black holes
A team of gravitational-wave scientists led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) reveal that when two black holes collide and merge, the remnant black hole 'chirps' not once, but multiple times, emitting gravitational waves--intense ripples in the fabric space and time--that inform us about its shape. Today the study has been published in Communications Physics (from the prestigious Nature journal). (2020-10-08)

Hunger encourages risk-taking
An insufficient food supply causes animals to engage in higher-risk behaviour: the willingness to take risks rises by an average of 26 per cent in animals that have experienced hunger earlier in their lives. That reveals a metaanalysis of scientists from the universities of Bielefeld and Jena (Germany). They evaluated experimental studies involving more than 100 animal species. (2020-10-05)

Could a poo transplant one day be the secret of eternal youth?
Poo transplants could one day be used to restore cognitive decline among the elderly - according to new research. A new study published today shows how faecal transplants from older to younger mice altered their gut microbiome, which in turn impacted their spatial learning and memory. The research team hope the reverse could also be true, and one day used as a therapy to restore cognitive function in older people. (2020-10-02)

COVID-19: Social dilemmas about protective measures
We need to understand how protective actions against contagious diseases are adopted to define the correct preventive approaches. A research team of the University of Geneva collected data about the adoption of protective measures. They analysed how the behaviour of others influences individual decision-making. The people least likely to adopt these measures are those who believe that the precautions taken by others mean that they do not need to take their own. (2020-10-02)

University of Ottawa study finds self-harm may be socially contagious among adolescents
A new study led by University of Ottawa epidemiologist Dr. Ian Colman suggests non-suicidal self-injury--behaviours like cutting oneself without the intent to die--may be contagious among teenagers, who are more likely to harm themselves when they know someone who has. (2020-10-01)

Girls benefit from doing sports
Extracurricular sport in middle childhood diminishes subsequent ADHD symptoms in girls, but not in boys, a new study suggests. (2020-09-29)

Driving behavior less 'robotic' thanks to new Delft model
Researchers from TU Delft have now developed a new model that describes driving behaviour on the basis of one underlying 'human' principle: managing the risk below a threshold level. This model can accurately predict human behaviour during a wide range of driving tasks. In time, the model could be used in intelligent cars, to make them feel less 'robotic'. The research will be published in Nature Communications on Tuesday 29 September 2020. (2020-09-29)

Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behaviour more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense. Described as 'unethical amnesia' by scientists, it is generally explained by self-image maintenance. But could these selective oversights, not necessarily conscious, have a more strategic aim? To find out, a team of behavioural economists from the CNRS recruited 1322 volunteers in an online experiment which took place over two sessions. (2020-09-29)

Shorebirds more likely to divorce after successful breeding
Research led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath found that a range of factors affected the fidelity and parenting behaviour of plovers, rather than being defined by the species. (2020-09-28)

COVID-19 control rests with human behavior, at least until a vaccine arrives
As the world awaits a COVID-19 vaccine and confirmed cases exceed 30M, Australian and American behavioural researchers say the key to containment rests in understanding human behaviour and how our personalities may influence better cooperative behaviour for the global good. Some countries are more agreeable and compliant than others. (2020-09-28)

Parental touch reduces pain responses in babies' brains
Being held by a parent with skin-to-skin contact reduces how strongly a newborn baby's brain responds to a painful medical jab, finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and York University, Canada. (2020-09-24)

Searching together: A lesson from rats
Concentrate on your own task but also pay attention to others--this is the key rule for success, at least for rats when exploring as a group The rat in a maze might be one of the most classic paradigms in the study of behaviour, but an international team of scientists has put a twist on this experimental motif to push the leading edge of technology and research into search strategies of collectives. (2020-09-24)

New tool mimics human skin to allow detailed study of mosquito biting
Scientists have developed a tool for studying the biting behaviour of common pathogen-carrying mosquitoes, according to new research published this week in eLife. (2020-09-23)

Bristol scientists shine light on tiny crystals behind unexpected violent eruptions
In a new study of volcanic processes, Bristol scientists have demonstrated the role nanolites play in the creation of violent eruptions at otherwise 'calm' and predictable volcanoes. The study, published in Science Advances, describes how nano-sized crystals (nanolites), 10,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair, can have a significant impact of the viscosity of erupting magma, resulting in previously unexplained and explosive eruptions. (2020-09-23)

Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behaviour or attitudes to migration. This is the main finding of a study conducted by Max Schaub (WZB), Johanna Gereke (MZES), and Delia Baldassarri (New York University). In the over 200 East German communities they examined, negative attitudes to migration were widespread. However, the arrival of refugees in the immediate neighbourhood had hardly any influence on these attitudes. (2020-09-22)

Reading in company boosts creativity
Language has evolved as a consequence of social interaction; however, most research is conducted with participants in isolation. What happens in our brain when we read in the company of others? Is it the same as reading alone? Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid and the Carlos III Health Institute have found that company is conducive to a more creative and integrated understanding of language, whereas isolation favours more systematic and automatic language processing. (2020-09-22)

Smart cells: Chemists develop tool with potential to treat illness at the cellular level
New research by an international team of chemists describes a new type of artificial cell that can communicate with other cells within the body--with potential applications in the field of smart pharmaceuticals. (2020-09-22)

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)

Camera monitoring significantly improves safety of HGV driving
A new study has shown HGV drivers drive much more safely when there are cameras in their cabs monitoring their behaviour. (2020-09-15)

TRESK regulates brain to track time using sunlight as its cue
Research from the University of Kent has found that TRESK, a calcium regulated two-pore potassium channel, regulates the brain's central circadian clock to differentiate behaviour between day and night. (2020-09-14)

Food mechanics recipe to serve up healthy food that lasts
Researchers are investigating the science of food drying to design faster, cheaper and better ways to store food. (2020-09-13)

Addicted to the sun? Research shows it's in your genes
Sun-seeking behaviour is linked to genes involved in addiction, behavioural and personality traits and brain function, according to a study of more than 260,000 people led by King's College London researchers. (2020-09-10)

AI used to show how hydrogen becomes a metal inside giant planets
Researchers have used a combination of AI and quantum mechanics to reveal how hydrogen gradually turns into a metal inside giant planets. (2020-09-09)

Suicide on screen: Getting the message right can support better mental health outcomes
In a new paper, University of South Australia researchers have confirmed that portrayals of suicide in moving-image fiction and non-fiction media, such as television and web series, films, and documentaries, has the potential to increase suicidal ideation and behaviour. (2020-09-08)

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