Current Bicycle Helmets News and Events

Current Bicycle Helmets News and Events, Bicycle Helmets News Articles.
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Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

Eggs reveal what may happen to brain on impact
Our brains consist of soft matter bathed in watery cerebrospinal fluid inside a hard skull, and in Physics of Fluids, researchers describe studying another system with the same features, an egg, to search for answers about concussions. Considering that in most concussive brain injuries, the skull does not break, they wanted to find out if it was possible to break or deform the egg yolk without breaking the eggshell. (2021-01-19)

Disposable helmet retains cough droplets, minimizes transmission to dentists
Dentists and otolaryngologists are at particular risk of infection of COVID-19, since they need direct access to the mouth, nose, and throat of patients. The current solutions are expensive, not highly effective, and not very accessible. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss their design of an open-faced helmet that is connected to a medical-grade air filtration pump from the top that creates a reverse flow of air to prevent cough droplets from exiting the helmet. (2021-01-12)

Study: in social media safety messages, the pictures should match the words
When using social media to nudge people toward safe and healthy behaviors, it's critical to make sure the words match the pictures, according to a new study. After looking at social media posts, parents of young children were better able to recall safety messages such as how to put a baby safely to sleep when the images in the posts aligned with the messages in the text. (2020-12-31)

Despite decrease in recent years, rate of sledding-related injuries still concerning
A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 220,488 patients were treated in U.S. emergency departments for injuries related to sledding from 2008 through 2017. Nearly 70% of these patients were children age 19 years and younger. (2020-12-16)

New findings for viral research on bicycle crashes at railroad crossings
Professor Chris Cherry's new work, ''A jughandle design will virtually eliminate single bicycle crashes at a railway crossing,'' provides a unique opportunity to assess the before and after safety performance of fixing a skewed rail crossing for single bicycle crashes. (2020-11-06)

Liquid nanofoam: A game changer for future football helmets
A liquid nanofoam liner undergoing testing could prolong the safe use of football helmets, says a Michigan State University researcher. (2020-10-28)

Exercise induces secretion of biomarkers into sweat
The aim was to reveal the potential of microRNAs in sweat extracellular vesicles in monitoring exercise performance. (2020-08-12)

Do bicycles slow down cars on low speed, low traffic roads? Latest research says 'no'
The new article Evidence from Urban Roads without Bicycle Lanes on the Impact of Bicycle Traffic on Passenger Car Travel Speeds published in Transportation Research Record, the Journal of the Transportation Research Board, demonstrates that bicycles do not significantly reduce passenger car travel speeds on low speed, low volume urban roads without bicycle lanes. The research shows that differences in vehicle speeds with and without cyclists were generally on the order of 1 mph or less - negligible from a practical perspective. (2020-07-23)

Researchers simulate, assess damage to brain cells caused by bubbles during head trauma
Researchers led by Nicole Hashemi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University, are using their expertise with the manufacture of microstructures to study how the collapse of microbubbles within the skull can damage brain cells. Their research, which is supported by the Office of Naval Research, could lead to the design of better helmets. (2020-07-22)

POSTECH solves the durability issue of hydrogen cars
Professor Yong-Tae Kim's research team improves the durability of automotive fuel cells through selective electro-catalysis. (2020-07-13)

Shock-dissipating fractal cubes could forge high-tech armor
3D printed cubes,with intricate fractal voids efficiently dissipate shockwaves, potentially leading to new types of lightweight armor and materials to better withstand explosions and impacts. (2020-07-07)

Study looks at the impact of gendar bias in helmet regulations for lacrosse players
According to a new study, high school girls' lacrosse players who may, but are not required to, wear flexible headgear are at a higher risk of getting a concussion from a stick or ball impact than boys' lacrosse players, who are required to wear a hard shell helmet with a full face mask. (2020-06-25)

Researchers create a photographic film of a molecular switch
Molecular switches are the molecular counterparts of electrical switches and play an important role in many processes in nature. Nanotechnologist now produced a photographic film at the atomic level and thus tracked the motion of a molecular building block. The result was a light-controlled 'pedalo-type motion', going forward and backward. The study has been published in the ''The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters''. (2020-06-18)

Repeated coughing seriously degrades face mask efficiency
Face masks are thought to slow the spread of viruses, including the COVID-19 virus, but little is known about how well they work. In Physics of Fluids, researchers use computer models to map expected flow patterns of droplets released when a mask-wearing person coughs repeatedly. Previous work showed droplets can travel 18 feet when an unmasked person coughs. This work used an extended model to consider the effect of masks and multiple cycles of coughing. (2020-06-16)

Researchers develop 3D-printable material that mimics biological tissues
University of Colorado Denver researchers are the first to 3D print a complex, porous lattice structure using liquid crystal elastomers creating devices that can mimic cartilage and other biological tissues. (2020-06-08)

Youth-inspired program increases bike helmet use by urban children
To reduce the number of traumatic brain injuries in children, a team of health care professionals at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is urging emergency room physicians to help ensure that youngsters are thoroughly educated on the proper use of bike helmets, especially in urban environments where most severe head injuries occur. (2020-06-05)

The death marker protein cleans up your muscles after exercise
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports have demonstrated that physical activity prompts a clean-up of muscles as the protein Ubiquitin tags onto worn-out proteins, causing them to be degraded. This prevents the accumulation of damaged proteins and helps keep muscles healthy. (2020-05-28)

Study shows uptick in at-home pediatric fractures during COVID-19 pandemic
COVID-19 social distancing measures, including the closure of schools and parks and the indefinite cancellation of team sports, have led to a nearly 60% decrease overall in pediatric fractures but an increase in the proportion of fractures sustained at home, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The findings, published in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, suggest a need for increased awareness of at-home safety measures. (2020-05-28)

Cardiorespiratory fitness assessment improves accuracy of health predictions
According to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published by Elsevier, taking cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) into account along with traditional risk factors such as age, sex, blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking, improves the accuracy of mortality risk assessment. (2020-04-30)

How mistakes help us recognize things
When we look at the same object in quick succession, our second glance always reflects a slightly falsified image of the object. Guided by various object characteristics such as motion direction, colour and spatial position, our short-term memory makes systematic mistakes. Apparently, these mistakes help us to stabilise the continually changing impressions of our environment. This has been discovered by scientists at the Institute of Medical Psychology at Goethe University. (2020-04-28)

Portland State study finds bike lanes provide positive economic impact
Despite longstanding popular belief, bicycle lanes can actually improve business. At worst, the negative impact on sales and employment is minimal, according to a new study from Portland State's Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC). Researchers studied 14 corridors in 6 cities -- Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Memphis, Minneapolis and Indianapolis -- and found such improvements had either positive or non-significant impacts on sales and employment. Essentially, adding improvements like bike lanes largely boosted business and employment in the retail and food service sectors. (2020-04-22)

Alarming abusive head trauma revealed in computational simulation impact study
Abusive head trauma (AHT), like that of Shaken Baby Syndrome, is the leading cause of fatal brain injuries in children under two. While children can suffer permanent neurological damage, developmental delay, and disability, the long-term effects of AHT are difficult to diagnose and predict. Now, researchers at New York Institute of Technology have developed computational simulations to help clinicians and caregivers better understand the impact of these injuries. (2020-04-09)

Safe tackling, padded helmets lower head injuries in youth football
Middle school football players greatly reduce the chance of head injuries if they wear padded helmets and use safe tackling and blocking techniques, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-03-04)

Future soldiers may get improved helmet padding
Army researchers and industry partners recently published a study showing how they developed new materials and manufacturing methods to create higher performing helmet padding that reduces the likelihood of head injury in combat and recreational helmets. (2020-02-19)

WWI helmets protect against shock waves just as well as modern designs
Biomedical engineers have demonstrated that, despite significant advancements in protection from ballistics and blunt impacts, modern military helmets are no better at protecting from shock waves than their World War I counterparts. One model in particular, the French Adrian helmet, actually performed better than modern designs. The research could help improve the blast protection of future helmets through choosing different materials, layering multiple materials of different acoustic impedance, or altering their geometry. (2020-02-14)

Dancing matter: New form of movement of cyclic macromolecules discovered
Employing a computer simulation, physicists Maximilian Liebetreu and Christos Likos have shown a unique dynamic behavior of cyclic polymers. Their motion can be distinguished into phases, and the scientists were able to observe the so-called ''inflation phase'' for the first time. During this new phase, they observed swelling and self-stabilization of the polymers. The results have been published in the first volume of new journal Nature Communications Materials. (2020-02-11)

Get easily out of breath? It may be because you were small at birth, study finds
Babies born with low birth weights are more likely to have poor cardiorespiratory fitness later in life than their normal-weight peers. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal JAHA. The findings underscore the importance of prevention strategies to reduce low birth weights even among those carried to at term delivery. (2020-01-31)

If it takes a hike, riders won't go for bike sharing
Even a relatively short walk to find the nearest bicycle is enough to deter many potential users of bike sharing systems, new Cornell research suggests. (2020-01-30)

Increasing opportunities for sustainable behavior
To mitigate climate change and safeguard ecosystems, we need to make drastic changes in our consumption and transport behaviors. A new IIASA study shows how even minor changes to available infrastructure can trigger tipping points in the collective adoption of sustainable behaviors. (2020-01-24)

Study provides the first data on concussion risk in youth football
'These are the first biomechanical data characterizing concussion risk in kids,' said Steve Rowson, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics and the director of the Virginia Tech Helmet Lab. 'Children aren't just scaled-down adults: Differences in anatomy and physiology, like head-neck proportions and brain development, contribute to differences in tolerance to head impact. These results can lead to data-driven interventions to reduce risk in youth sports.' (2020-01-21)

Urban health scare: E-scooters show alarming spike in injuries
Electric scooters are increasingly part of the crowded urban landscape, but a UC San Francisco study has found a major surge of injuries related to scooters, particularly among young adults. (2020-01-08)

Maximizing bike-share ridership: New research says it's all about location
The popularity of bike-share systems has grown in popularity thanks to the younger, more environmentally conscious generation. While they have garnered considerable attention in cities from Paris to Washington, D.C., their promise of urban transformation is far from being fully realized. (2020-01-06)

How minds make meaning
Meaning is central to language. But how do we combine the building blocks of thought and language to compose meaning? A special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, edited by Andrea E. Martin from the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics and Giosuè Baggio from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, brings together fifteen contributions from the fields of linguistics, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and computer science to answer this age-old question. (2019-12-16)

New study looks at motorized scooter injuries
More than half of people who received X-rays or CT scans after electric scooter accidents were found to have injuries, most commonly to the upper extremities, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings underscore the need for more public education on the use of these scooters. (2019-12-03)

New pads absorb shock better than foam with air flow and easy manufacture
HRL Laboratories has published test results showing shock-absorbing pads made from HRL's microlattice material had up to 27% higher energy absorption efficiency than the current best-performing expanded polystyrene foam when sustaining a single impact and up to 35% higher energy absorption efficiency than state-of-the-art vinyl nitrile foam when impacted repeatedly. Microlattice could replace current foams in protective packaging, shock isolators for electronics, vehicle interiors, and helmet padding from football to children's bicycle helmets. (2019-11-27)

Material for safer football helmets may reduce head injuries
Scientists at the University of California Santa Barbara, HRL Laboratories LLC, and the US Army Research Laboratory have developed elastic microlattice pads that can withstand both single hits and a series of impacts better than existing state-of-the-art foams used in football helmets. Their research, publishing Nov. 27 in the journal Matter, suggests that the material may pave the way for helmets that better protect football players from brain injuries caused by repeated head hits. (2019-11-27)

Multifunctional small brains
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience in Amsterdam, discovered that not only the cerebral cortex is responsible for higher perceptual abilities but that the cerebellum also plays a role. This discovery can help understand the consequences of damage to the small brain, since not only motoric impairment will appear, but also social cognition can be altered. The study was published today in the prominent scientific journal Brain. (2019-11-21)

Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries are on the rise, Rutgers study finds
Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries among older riders are on the rise. (2019-10-29)

Are some urban settings riskier for traffic injury or death? We know less than you think
How risky is travel in the US? It gets tricky. Despite a lot of research on the dangers of traffic injury and death, there's a lack of clarity on the role of the built environment (roadway designs and adjoining development) and its risk effects. Before we can know how risky a given built environment is, we have to know how many people are traveling there, and in many cases, for pedestrians and cyclists, this data is not available. (2019-10-15)

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