Current Bicycle News and Events

Current Bicycle News and Events, Bicycle News Articles.
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In Ethiopia, mother's wealth more protective against child marriage than father's
For a girl in Ethiopia, her mother's wealth can protect her from becoming a child bride - but if a father prefers child marriage, his own wealth may increase the likelihood that she will be married before 18, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study. (2021-02-04)

Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

New findings for viral research on bicycle crashes at railroad crossings
Professor Chris Cherry's new work, ''A jughandle design will virtually eliminate single bicycle crashes at a railway crossing,'' provides a unique opportunity to assess the before and after safety performance of fixing a skewed rail crossing for single bicycle crashes. (2020-11-06)

Exercise induces secretion of biomarkers into sweat
The aim was to reveal the potential of microRNAs in sweat extracellular vesicles in monitoring exercise performance. (2020-08-12)

Do bicycles slow down cars on low speed, low traffic roads? Latest research says 'no'
The new article Evidence from Urban Roads without Bicycle Lanes on the Impact of Bicycle Traffic on Passenger Car Travel Speeds published in Transportation Research Record, the Journal of the Transportation Research Board, demonstrates that bicycles do not significantly reduce passenger car travel speeds on low speed, low volume urban roads without bicycle lanes. The research shows that differences in vehicle speeds with and without cyclists were generally on the order of 1 mph or less - negligible from a practical perspective. (2020-07-23)

POSTECH solves the durability issue of hydrogen cars
Professor Yong-Tae Kim's research team improves the durability of automotive fuel cells through selective electro-catalysis. (2020-07-13)

Researchers create a photographic film of a molecular switch
Molecular switches are the molecular counterparts of electrical switches and play an important role in many processes in nature. Nanotechnologist now produced a photographic film at the atomic level and thus tracked the motion of a molecular building block. The result was a light-controlled 'pedalo-type motion', going forward and backward. The study has been published in the ''The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters''. (2020-06-18)

Youth-inspired program increases bike helmet use by urban children
To reduce the number of traumatic brain injuries in children, a team of health care professionals at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is urging emergency room physicians to help ensure that youngsters are thoroughly educated on the proper use of bike helmets, especially in urban environments where most severe head injuries occur. (2020-06-05)

The death marker protein cleans up your muscles after exercise
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports have demonstrated that physical activity prompts a clean-up of muscles as the protein Ubiquitin tags onto worn-out proteins, causing them to be degraded. This prevents the accumulation of damaged proteins and helps keep muscles healthy. (2020-05-28)

Study shows uptick in at-home pediatric fractures during COVID-19 pandemic
COVID-19 social distancing measures, including the closure of schools and parks and the indefinite cancellation of team sports, have led to a nearly 60% decrease overall in pediatric fractures but an increase in the proportion of fractures sustained at home, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The findings, published in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, suggest a need for increased awareness of at-home safety measures. (2020-05-28)

Cardiorespiratory fitness assessment improves accuracy of health predictions
According to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published by Elsevier, taking cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) into account along with traditional risk factors such as age, sex, blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking, improves the accuracy of mortality risk assessment. (2020-04-30)

How mistakes help us recognize things
When we look at the same object in quick succession, our second glance always reflects a slightly falsified image of the object. Guided by various object characteristics such as motion direction, colour and spatial position, our short-term memory makes systematic mistakes. Apparently, these mistakes help us to stabilise the continually changing impressions of our environment. This has been discovered by scientists at the Institute of Medical Psychology at Goethe University. (2020-04-28)

Portland State study finds bike lanes provide positive economic impact
Despite longstanding popular belief, bicycle lanes can actually improve business. At worst, the negative impact on sales and employment is minimal, according to a new study from Portland State's Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC). Researchers studied 14 corridors in 6 cities -- Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Memphis, Minneapolis and Indianapolis -- and found such improvements had either positive or non-significant impacts on sales and employment. Essentially, adding improvements like bike lanes largely boosted business and employment in the retail and food service sectors. (2020-04-22)

Dancing matter: New form of movement of cyclic macromolecules discovered
Employing a computer simulation, physicists Maximilian Liebetreu and Christos Likos have shown a unique dynamic behavior of cyclic polymers. Their motion can be distinguished into phases, and the scientists were able to observe the so-called ''inflation phase'' for the first time. During this new phase, they observed swelling and self-stabilization of the polymers. The results have been published in the first volume of new journal Nature Communications Materials. (2020-02-11)

Get easily out of breath? It may be because you were small at birth, study finds
Babies born with low birth weights are more likely to have poor cardiorespiratory fitness later in life than their normal-weight peers. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal JAHA. The findings underscore the importance of prevention strategies to reduce low birth weights even among those carried to at term delivery. (2020-01-31)

If it takes a hike, riders won't go for bike sharing
Even a relatively short walk to find the nearest bicycle is enough to deter many potential users of bike sharing systems, new Cornell research suggests. (2020-01-30)

Increasing opportunities for sustainable behavior
To mitigate climate change and safeguard ecosystems, we need to make drastic changes in our consumption and transport behaviors. A new IIASA study shows how even minor changes to available infrastructure can trigger tipping points in the collective adoption of sustainable behaviors. (2020-01-24)

Maximizing bike-share ridership: New research says it's all about location
The popularity of bike-share systems has grown in popularity thanks to the younger, more environmentally conscious generation. While they have garnered considerable attention in cities from Paris to Washington, D.C., their promise of urban transformation is far from being fully realized. (2020-01-06)

How minds make meaning
Meaning is central to language. But how do we combine the building blocks of thought and language to compose meaning? A special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, edited by Andrea E. Martin from the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics and Giosuè Baggio from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, brings together fifteen contributions from the fields of linguistics, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and computer science to answer this age-old question. (2019-12-16)

Multifunctional small brains
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience in Amsterdam, discovered that not only the cerebral cortex is responsible for higher perceptual abilities but that the cerebellum also plays a role. This discovery can help understand the consequences of damage to the small brain, since not only motoric impairment will appear, but also social cognition can be altered. The study was published today in the prominent scientific journal Brain. (2019-11-21)

Are some urban settings riskier for traffic injury or death? We know less than you think
How risky is travel in the US? It gets tricky. Despite a lot of research on the dangers of traffic injury and death, there's a lack of clarity on the role of the built environment (roadway designs and adjoining development) and its risk effects. Before we can know how risky a given built environment is, we have to know how many people are traveling there, and in many cases, for pedestrians and cyclists, this data is not available. (2019-10-15)

Traffic experts, parents don't always see eye to eye on safe cycling routes for children
Parents often disagree with transportation experts over what streets are safe for children to ride bikes, a Rutgers-led study finds. (2019-10-07)

Physical activity and good fitness improve cardiac regulation in children
A recent Finnish study showed that more physically active and fit children have better cardiac regulation than less active and fit children. The study also showed that cardiac regulation was better especially in boys with better aerobic fitness and in girls with lower levels of sedentary time. (2019-10-02)

Over one-fifth of injured US adult cyclists were not wearing a helmet -- new study
Men and ethnic minorities are less likely to wear cycle helmets and more likely to suffer from head and neck injuries in accidents, according to new research published in Brain Injury. (2019-09-13)

Exercising at home has a positive effect on Parkinson's patients
In a large double-blind study, Radboud university medical center researchers show that patients in the early stages of Parkinson's disease can exercise regularly at home for 6 months. This regular exercise has a positive effect on their motor disability comparable to the effect of conventional Parkinson's medication. (2019-09-12)

It is best not to fly to conferences
The political scientist Sebastian Jäckle develops a climate-friendly concept for international conference tourism. (2019-09-04)

Drug use, excess alcohol and no helmet common among US injured eScooter users
A significant proportion of eScooter injuries in the US seem to be occurring while 'drivers' are under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol and almost never wearing a helmet, suggests a study of admissions to three US major trauma centres, published online in Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open. (2019-08-29)

Take a break! Brain stimulation improves motor learning
In a joint study, Jost-Julian Rumpf from the University of Leipzig and Gesa Hartwigsen from MPI CBS suggest the process of motor learning probably already begins during short interruptions of practice. Further, the solidification process can be improved with brain stimulation. (2019-08-09)

Nearly three-quarters of traumatic brain injuries in under-19s caused by consumer products
A vast report, looking at the products and activities associated with non-fatal traumatic brain injuries for youngsters aged up to 19, in 66 US hospitals' emergency departments, has revealed that floors, beds and American football are posing some of the greatest risks. (2019-07-29)

Study finds nearly half of shared e-scooters being ridden illegally
A QUT observational study of electric scooter riding in central Brisbane has found nearly half of shared e-scooters were being ridden illegally. (2019-07-11)

To increase bike commuters, look to neighborhoods
People agree that bike commuting improves health, reduces air pollution and eases traffic, a recent survey suggests. But that wasn't enough to get most people to commute by bike. New research indicates that a person's neighborhood may play a large role in influencing the decision to commute by bike. (2019-06-26)

On your bike?
A James Cook University researcher says a lack of suitable roads is a big reason why cycling participation rates in Australia and Queensland are so low. (2019-06-13)

Sweating for science: A sauna session is just as exhausting as moderate exercise
Your blood pressure does not drop during a sauna visit - it rises, as well as your heart rate. This increase is even comparable to the effect of a short, moderate workout. This is the result of a new study conducted by researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Medical Center Berlin (MCB). For their study, the researchers placed their participants both in a sauna and on a bicycle ergometer. (2019-06-12)

Cycling lanes, not cyclists, reduce fatalities for all road users
The most comprehensive study of bicycle and road safety to date finds that building safe facilities for cyclists is one of the biggest factors in road safety for everyone. Bicycling infrastructure -- specifically, separated and protected bike lanes -- leads to fewer fatalities and better road-safety outcomes for all road users. New study published in Journal of Transport & Health. (2019-05-29)

Nearly 1 in 5 parents say their child never wears a helmet while riding a bike
Despite evidence that helmets are critical to preventing head injuries, not all children wear them while biking, skateboarding and riding scooters, a new national poll finds. (2019-05-20)

Children who walk to school less likely to be overweight or obese, study suggests
Children who regularly walk or cycle to school are less likely to be overweight or obese than those who travel by car or public transport, a new study suggests. (2019-05-19)

More than a strip of paint needed to keep cyclists safe
On-road marked bicycle lanes are not the optimal solution to keeping cyclists safe, new research by Monash University has found. (2019-04-10)

Nanotechnology enables engineers to weld previously un-weldable aluminum alloy
Engineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering are using nanotechnology to weld the alloy, known as AA 7075, which has been almost impossible to weld together using the technique commonly used to assemble body panels or engine parts. (2019-02-12)

Fractures, head injuries common in e-scooter collisions, according to UCLA research
UCLA researchers have found that people involved in electric scooter accidents are sometimes injured badly enough -- from fractures, dislocated joints and head injuries -- to require treatment in an emergency department. (2019-02-12)

How exercise reduces belly fat in humans
Some of you may have made a New Year's resolution to hit the gym to tackle that annoying belly fat. But have you ever wondered how physical activity produces this desired effect? A signaling molecule called interleukin-6 plays a critical role in this process, researchers report December 27 in the journal Cell Metabolism. (2018-12-27)

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