Current Big Data News and Events

Current Big Data News and Events, Big Data News Articles.
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Study finds COVID risk communication targeting younger adults may have biggest impact
A study of adults in the United States finds that - broadly speaking - the older you are, the more concerned you are about COVID-19, and the more steps you take to reduce your risk from COVID-19. The study suggests that the biggest boost in risk reduction would stem from communication efforts aimed at raising awareness of COVID-19 risks among U.S. adults under the age of 40. (2021-02-23)

The effects of antidepressant drugs evaluated through the analysis of patients' tweet
Scientists have identified behavioural and linguistic changes in tweets in Spanish published by users suffering from depression and who are taking medication to treat this disease. (2021-02-12)

How elephants evolved to become big and cancer-resistant
In this new study, 'We explored how elephants and their living and extinct relatives evolved to be cancer-resistant,' says University at Buffalo biologist Vincent Lynch. He adds, regarding the findings, 'Elephants have lots and lots and lots of extra copies of tumor suppressor genes, and they all contribute probably a little bit to cancer resistance.' (2021-02-04)

Microbiome Search Engine 2 helps researchers explore microbiome space
To correlate the newly developed microbiomes with existing data sets, researchers from the Qingdao Institute of BioEnergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and their collaborators developed the Microbiome Search Engine 2 (MSE 2). (2021-01-22)

Researchers speed up analysis of Arctic ice and snow data through AI
Professors at University of Maryland, Baltimore County have developed an artificial intelligence technique to quickly analyze newly collected data based on Arctic ice and snow thickness. Researchers previously analyzed these data manually; this AI will assist them by automating how they detect and analyze patterns in the thickness of the ice. Climate change necessitates a rapid understanding of new developments in the Arctic ice, and this tool provides a faster solution. (2021-01-12)

Eurasian eagle owl diet reveals new records of threatened giant bush-crickets
Bird diets provide a real treasure for research into the distribution and conservation of their prey, conclude scientists after studying the Eurasian Eagle Owl in southeastern Bulgaria. In their paper, published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal Travaux du Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle ''Grigore Antipa'', they report the frequent presence of the threatened Big-Bellied Glandular Bush-Cricket, and conclude that studies on the Eurasian Eagle Owl could be used to identify biodiversity-rich areas in need of protection. (2021-01-05)

'Boss' genes could save human hearts - and the reef
UQ researchers have revealed rare decision-making genes in cells, which control how cells develop and respond to stress caused by disease or their environment. Researchers hope that in the future, they may be able to block a cell's bad decisions to prevent disease. (2020-12-13)

UMBC researchers use machine learning to develop more accurate COVID-19 diagnostic tool
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a method of generating high-quality chest X-ray images that can be used to diagnose COVID-19 more accurately than current methods. (2020-12-10)

Big data saves lives, and patient safeguards are needed
The use of big data to address the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts poses ethical concerns that could undermine its benefits without clear governance guidelines that protect and respect patients and society, a University of Massachusetts Amherst study concludes. (2020-11-30)

Towards 6G wireless communication networks: vision, enabling technologies, and new paradigm shifts
Recently, a long-form review titled ''Towards 6G wireless communication networks: vision, enabling technologies, and new paradigm shifts'' was published in SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences Vol. 64, No.1. This article, co-authored by 50 researchers from 24 scientific research institutes, colleges, and companies both at home and abroad, provides a comprehensive survey of the latest progress and developmental trends about 6G networks. (2020-11-25)

Study reveals true origin of oldest evidence of animals
Two teams of scientists have resolved a longstanding controversy surrounding the origins of complex life on Earth. The joint studies found molecular fossils extracted from 635-million-year-old rocks aren't the earliest evidence of animals, but instead common algae. (2020-11-23)

New understanding of mobility paves way for tomorrow's transport systems
Researchers at DTU and the University of Copenhagen have developed a ground-breaking model that provides a completely new understanding of our movement patterns. The model can come to play an important role when designing tomorrow's green modes of transport and has just been published in Nature. (2020-11-18)

Keep the data coming
A continuous data supply ensures data-intensive simulations can run at maximum speed. (2020-11-09)

Ecological "big-data" reveals insights into a changing arctic
The Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA) - a new ecological dataset, which combines three decades of animal tracking studies from across the Arctic - provides a powerful new ecological tool to understand the rapidly changing region better. (2020-11-05)

Smaller earthquakes "with ambition" produce the most ground shaking
An earthquake of magnitude 8.0 or larger will almost always cause strong shaking, but a new study suggests that smaller earthquakes--those around magnitude 5.5 or so--are the cause of most occurrences of strong shaking at a 60-kilometer (37-mile) distance. (2020-11-04)

A.I. tool provides more accurate flu forecasts
Yue Ning and her team at Stevens Institute of Technology trained their A.I. tool using real-world state and regional data from the U.S. and Japan, then tested its forecasts against historical flu data. By incorporating location data, the A.I. system is able to outperform other state-of-the-art forecasting methods, delivering up to an 11% increase in accuracy and predicting influenza outbreaks up to 15 weeks in advance. (2020-11-02)

Where you get depression care matters, study finds
Research shows that collaborative care programs in which primary-care providers work with a depression care manager and a designated psychiatric consultant can more than double the likelihood of improving depression outcomes. But a new study published in Health Affairs shows that not all care is equal. (2020-11-02)

Researchers present findings on role of google search early in COVID-19 pandemic
A team from the George Washington University will present at the American College of Emergency Physicians annual conference, on results of their study exploring the role of Google searches during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. (2020-10-26)

New global temperature data will inform study of climate impacts on health, agriculture
A new data set provides high-resolution, daily temperatures from around the globe that could prove valuable in studying human health impacts from heat waves, risks to agriculture, droughts, potential crop failures, and food insecurity. (2020-10-13)

Harnessing big data and artificial intelligence to predict future pandemic spread
During COVID-19, artificial intelligence (AI) has been used to enhance diagnostic efforts, deliver medical supplies and even assess risk factors from blood tests. Now, artificial intelligence is being used to forecast future COVID-19 cases. (2020-09-29)

Gravity causes homogeneity of the universe
Gravity can accelerate the homogenization of space-time as the universe evolves. This insight is based on theoretical studies of the physicist David Fajman of the University of Vienna. The results have been published in the journal 'Physical Review Letters'. (2020-09-24)

Biggest fish in the sea are girls
Female whale sharks grow more slowly than males but end up being larger, research suggests. (2020-09-16)

KU astronomer helps confirm first-ever planet found orbiting white dwarf
A University of Kansas astronomer played a key role on the team that today announced the first-ever discovery of a planet orbiting a white dwarf. The finding, published in Nature, shows the likely presence of a Jupiter-sized planet, named WD 1856 b, orbiting the smaller star remnant every 34 hours. (2020-09-16)

Ocean carbon uptake widely underestimated
The world's oceans soak up more carbon than most scientific models suggest, according to new research. (2020-09-04)

All that glitters is not gold: Misuse of AI by big tech can harm developing countries
The debate on the risks and benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still ongoing, but one thing is certain: without appropriate regulatory measures, AI is potentially dangerous. A recent study explores how AI can be a threat to the society, especially developing nations, if left unregulated. The study also talks about why AI should comply with the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, to ensure that it benefits the society as a whole. (2020-08-27)

Shrinking Tasmanian tigers: Resizing an Australian icon
The thylacine, that famous extinct Australian icon colloquially known as the Tasmanian Tiger, is revealed to have been only about half as big as once thought - not a ''big'' bad wolf after all. (2020-08-18)

Classifying galaxies with artificial intelligence
Astronomers have applied artificial intelligence (AI) to ultra-wide field-of-view images of the distant Universe captured by the Subaru Telescope, and have achieved a very high accuracy for finding and classifying spiral galaxies in those images. This technique, in combination with citizen science, is expected to yield further discoveries in the future. (2020-08-11)

Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence
Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former partners. The study analyzed the responses of more than 570,000 women from the National Crime Victimization Survey from 1994-2015. Women from small towns were 27% more likely to be victims of intimate partner violence than women from the center of big cities and 42% more likely than suburban women. (2020-08-06)

Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem
A new algorithm developed in the lab of Jr-Shin Li at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis provides a framework for solving complex linear inverse problems that doesn't require a supercomputer and also enhances security and privacy. (2020-08-04)

NASA sun data helps new model predict big solar flares
Using data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, scientists have developed a new model that successfully predicted seven of the Sun's biggest flares from the last solar cycle, out of a set of nine. With more development, the model could be used to one day inform forecasts of these intense bursts of solar radiation. (2020-07-31)

Surprisingly young galaxy breaks low-oxygen record
A galaxy in the constellation Hercules that only recently started making stars has broken the record for having the lowest level of oxygen ever seen in a young galaxy. Astronomers used two Maunakea Observatories combined with machine learning to find the rare object. (2020-07-31)

Report provides new framework for understanding climate risks, impacts to US agriculture
A new USDA report focuses on how agricultural systems are impacted by climate change and offers a list of 20 indicators that provide a broad look at what's happening across the country. (2020-07-29)

Growing up trilobite
If you've ever held a trilobite fossil, seen one in a classroom, or walked by one in a store, chances are it was Elrathia kingii, one of the most common and well-recognized trilobites. New work describes the development and growth rate of Elrathia kingii--only the second such dataset to be compiled for a trilobite--allowing for the first comparison among trilobite species. (2020-07-15)

AI model to forecast complicated large-scale tropical instability waves in Pacific Ocean
Prof. LI Xiaofeng from the Institute of Oceanology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCAS) and his collaborators from Ministry of Natural Resources and Shanghai Ocean University studied this type of complex oceanic phenomena through artificial intelligence (AI) technologies. (2020-07-15)

New research highlights potential cardiovascular risk of novel anti-osteoporotic drug
Research presents new evidence which strengthens the plausibility that treatment with the novel anti-osteoporotic medicine, romosozumab, may lead to excess cardiovascular complications. Writing in Science Translational Medicine, the authors, from the University of Oxford's Big Data Institute and the Nuffield Department of Population Health, report that by combining data across clinical trials of romosozumab, there is some evidence that use of this drug leads to increased cardiovascular risk. (2020-06-24)

Scientists create program that finds synteny blocks in different animals
Scientists developed a software tool that makes it possible to quickly and efficiently find similar parts in the genomes of different animals, which is essential for understanding how closely related two species are, and how far they have evolved from their common ancestor. The research was published in Giga Science. (2020-06-23)

Fish evolution in action: Land fish forced to adapt after leap out of water
Many blennies - a remarkable family of fishes - evolved from an aquatic 'jack of all trades' to a 'master of one' upon the invasion of land, a new study led by UNSW scientists has shown. (2020-06-17)

New study finds surface disturbance can limit mule deer migration
Researchers used 145 migrations from 56 individual deer to examine disturbance effects at various scales. Results consistently showed that mule deer use of migration corridors steeply declined when surface disturbance from roads and well pads surpassed 3%. Mule deer were able to migrate through areas where surface disturbance was lower. (2020-06-10)

Big vegetarians of the reef drive fish evolution
New research finds fish diets, not geography, dictate how fast species evolve. (2020-06-01)

New study finds cannibalism in predatory dinosaurs
Big theropod dinosaurs such as Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus ate pretty much everything -- including each other, according to a new study. (2020-05-28)

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