Current Bilingual News and Events

Current Bilingual News and Events, Bilingual News Articles.
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Growing up in a bilingual home has lasting benefits
New research has found that growing up in a bilingual home can provide unexpected cognitive benefits later in life. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, demonstrates for the first time that adults who acquired their second language as a young child (early bilinguals) are quicker at shifting attention and quicker at detecting visual changes compared to adults who learnt their second language later in life (late bilinguals). (2021-01-22)

Northern lakes at risk of losing ice cover permanently, impacting drinking water
Close to 5,700 lakes in the Northern Hemisphere may permanently lose ice cover this century, 179 of them in the next decade, at current greenhouse gas emissions, despite a possible polar vortex this year, researchers at York University have found. Those lakes include large bays in some of the deepest of the Great Lakes, such as Lake Superior and Lake Michigan, which could permanently become ice free by 2055. (2021-01-13)

What happens when your brain can't tell which way is up or down?
What feels like up may actually be some other direction depending on how our brains process our orientation, according to psychology researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. In a new study published in PLoS One, researchers at York University's Centre for Vision Research found that an individual's interpretation of the direction of gravity can be altered by how their brain responds to visual information. (2021-01-07)

New research shows masks change the way we process faces
New study finds that our ability to recognize faces is severely impaired by masks, and this decreased face perception is impacting our social interactions with others. (2020-12-21)

Accent perception depends on backgrounds of speaker, listener
Visual cues can change listeners' perception of others' accents, and people's past exposure to varied speech can also impact their perception of accents. Ethan Kutlu will discuss his team's work testing the impact that visual input and linguistic diversity has on listeners' perceived accentedness judgments in two different locations: Gainesville, Florida, and Montreal, Canada. The session will take place Dec. 9 as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-09)

Brains work harder while processing descriptions of motion in other languages
Different languages describe motion differently, according to distinct lexical rules. And though we may not consciously notice those rules, we follow them -- and Georgia State researchers have found they affect how our brains perceive and process descriptions of physical movement. (2020-12-09)

Does your pain feel different in English and Spanish?
In a recent study, University of Miami graduate student Morgan Gianola hoped to clarify how such psychological differences across languages might also relate to changes in physical and emotional experiences, like pain. (2020-11-30)

Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive decline
According to a study led by Marco Calabria, a researcher of the Speech Production and Bilingualism research group and of the Cognitive NeuroLab at the UOC, the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment in Alzheimer patients with a higher degree of bilingualism is delayed. (2020-11-16)

Children misdiagnosed with "impairment of language acquisition"
Around 45% of children in Austrian day nurseries have a first language other than German. Those who our experiencing difficulty in learning the second language are often diagnosed as having a suspected ''impairment of language acquisition''. In fact, this often merely reflects the fact that they have not yet fully acquired the second language. (2020-11-16)

New survey reveals toll Covid-19 is taking on mental health in Wales
A new survey has revealed the extent of the impact Covid-19 has had on mental health in Wales with younger adults, women and people from deprived areas suffering the most. The research carried out by Swansea University' and Cardiff University examines the pandemic's impact on the mental wellbeing of the Welsh population. (2020-11-11)

New education 'hubs' for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close
New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said. (2020-09-24)

New freshwater database tells water quality story for 12K lakes globally
Although less than one per cent of all water in the world is freshwater, it is what we drink and use for agriculture. In other words, it's vital to human survival. York University researchers have just created a publicly available water quality database for close to 12,000 freshwater lakes globally - almost half of the world's freshwater supply - that will help scientists monitor and manage the health of these lakes. (2020-09-22)

Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive impairment
A study has shown that Alzheimer's patients with a higher degree of bilingualism receive a later diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (2020-09-18)

Bilingual children may lose less brain matter as they grow up
Children and adolescents who speak more than one language may reach adulthood with better brain structure, according to a new study. (2020-09-02)

Yale trial addresses health disparities in alcohol treatment
Yale researchers are completing a first-of-its-kind clinical trial to test the efficacy of an automated bilingual alcohol screening and intervention tool for use in emergency departments (EDs). The computerized tool, administered to English- and Spanish-speaking Latino patient volunteers, is designed to address health disparities in the treatment of alcohol use disorders. (2020-09-01)

About 94 per cent of wild bee and native plant species networks lost, York study finds
Climate change and an increase in disturbed bee habitats from expanding agriculture and development in northeastern North America over the last 30 years are likely responsible for a 94 per cent loss of plant-pollinator networks, York University researchers found. The researchers, corresponding author Professor Sandra Rehan of the Faculty of Science and grad student Minna Mathiasson of the University of New Hampshire, looked at plant-pollinator networks from 125 years ago through present day. (2020-07-14)

York study: European ancestry plays role in 'killer' honey bees' aggressiveness
What causes African hybrid honey bees (AHB) or killer bees to be highly defensive and aggressive? York University researchers found it was the mixing of African and European genetics that led to hyper-aggression in this invasive strain of honey bees. Researchers in Brazil imported a honey bee subspecies from South African in the 1950s and bred them with European-derived honey bees, but bees escaped and mated with the local bees - an experiment gone wrong. (2020-07-05)

Putting COVID-19 diagnostic tests to the 'test' -- how do they hold up?
As SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to mutate, it is important to check the efficacy of current diagnostic tests, say York University researchers, who found seven out of 27 methods had potential sequence mismatch issues that may lead to underperforming or false-negative COVID-19 test results. (2020-06-09)

Infants have a basic knowledge of the role and limitations of language
Marc Colomer and Núria Sebastián Gallés, members of the Speech Acquisition and Perception (SAP) research group of the Center for Brain and Cognition (CBC) at UPF have investigated whether 14 month-old infants understand that language is a communication tool for transmitting information between speakers of the same language. The study is published in the advanced online edition of the journal Cognition. (2020-06-08)

Study shows some infants can identify differences in musical tones at six months
New research from neuroscientists at York University suggests the capacity to hear the highs and lows, also known as the major and minor notes in music, may come before you take a single lesson; you may actually be born with it. The study examined the capacity of six-month-old infants to discriminate between a major and a minor musical tone sequence with a unique method that uses eye movements and a visual stimulus. (2020-06-04)

Ozone-depleting chemical alternatives getting into our food and water
An international environmental agreement to regulate the use of chemicals depleting the ozone layer may have inadvertently allowed higher levels of other harmful chemicals to flourish, new research co-led by York University and Environment and Climate Change Canada has found. These replacement compounds degrade into products that do not break down in the environment and have instead continually increased in the Arctic since about 1990. (2020-05-14)

SUTD research shows evidence that bilingualism delays the brain's aging process
SUTD study found that seniors who speak two languages actively tend to maintain specific executive control abilities against natural age-related declines. (2020-05-04)

Gender bias in commenting poses barriers to women scholars: York University sociologist
Women academics are less likely than men to comment on published research, limiting scholarly debate, a new study co-authored by York University sociologist Professor Cary Wu, shows. According to the study, women are also relatively less likely to comment on their male counterparts, published research. Wu and his co-authors reviewed comments in two major scientific journals for this study. (2020-04-02)

How well do you know the back of your hand, really?
Many of us are spending a lot of time looking at our hands lately and we think we know them pretty well. But research from York University's Centre for Vision Research shows the way our brains perceive our hands is inaccurate. (2020-03-24)

York University researchers one step closer to creating organic batteries
York University researchers have discovered a way to make Lithium-powered batteries more environmentally friendly while retaining performance, stability and storage capacity. Their latest breakthrough is the creation of a new carbon-based organic molecule that can replace the cobalt now used in cathodes or positive electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. The new material addresses the shortcomings of the inorganic material while maintaining performance. (2020-03-05)

Bilingualism acts as a cognitive reserve factor against dementia
The conclusions of a study carried out by Víctor Costumero, as the first author, Marco Calabria and Albert Costa (died in 2018), members of the Speech Production and Bilingualism (SPB) group at the Cognition and Brain Center (CBC) of the Department of Information Technology and the Communications (DTIC) of the UPF, together with researchers from the Universities of Jaume I, Valencia, Barcelona and Jaén; IDIBELL, Hospital La Fe (Valencia) and Grupo Médico ERESA (Valencia). (2020-03-04)

Bilingual mash ups: Counterintuitive findings from sociolinguistics
A new study exposes the fallacy of relying on pronunciation as a measure of linguistic proficiency. The study, 'Revisiting phonetic integration in bilingual borrowing', by Shana Poplack, Suzanne Robillard, Nathalie Dion (all from the University of Ottawa), and John. C. Paolillo (University of Indiana Bloomington) will be published in March 2020 issue of the scholarly journal Language. (2020-02-26)

Babies from bilingual homes switch attention faster
Babies born into bilingual homes change the focus of their attention more quickly and more frequently than babies in homes where only one language is spoken, according to new research published in the journal Royal Society Open Science. (2020-02-25)

How language proficiency correlates with cognitive skills
An international team of researchers carried out an experiment at HSE University demonstrating that knowledge of several languages can improve the performance of the human brain. In their study, they registered a correlation between participants' cognitive control and their proficiency in a second language. (2020-02-18)

Can bilingualism protect the brain even with early stages of dementia?
A study by York University psychology researchers provides new evidence that bilingualism can delay symptoms of dementia. Researchers found bilingualism provides the brain with greater cognitive reserve, delaying onset of symptoms. (2020-02-13)

Mind the trust gap: it's wider than you think
The regional gap in trust is not a result of the higher percentage of Black Americans -- who tend to have lower trust - living in the south, York University sociologist Prof. Cary Wu, who conducted the study said. Instead, the distrust is deeply rooted in the unique social and political culture shaped by the defeat in the Civil War, history of slavery, poverty, and prominence of religion in the southern United States. (2020-02-12)

UW research expands bilingual language program for babies
A study by the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) shows that a bilingual language program for babies can reach more families, and instructors, through online training for teachers. (2020-01-23)

'Bilingual' molecule connects two basic codes for life
'Much like a translator enables communication between two people from different regions of the world, we envision that our bilingual molecule will enable us to mediate new forms of communications between nucleic acids and proteins in the cellular environment,' says Jennifer Heemstra, associate professor of chemistry at Emory University. (2020-01-09)

Bilingual children are strong, creative storytellers, study shows
Bilingual children use as many words as monolingual children when telling a story, and demonstrate high levels of cognitive flexibility, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists. (2019-12-19)

Inter faculty -- Journal of Interdisciplinary Research in Human and Social Sciences, Vol.9
Volume 9 of Inter Faculty takes up the theme of patterns of confluence and influence in the context of the movements of history. (2019-11-29)

Disclaimers on retouched photos don't solve problem of negative body image
Labels that warn an image has been altered or enhanced do nothing to mitigate women's negative perceptions of their appearance, according to a study published in Body Image this week. More importantly, some disclaimers heightened and even harmed body dissatisfaction in at-risk women, the study showed. (2019-11-28)

York University vision scientists disprove 60-year-old perception theory
Vision researchers at York University have disproved a long-standing theory of how the human vision system processes images, using computational models and human experiments. The findings could have implications for the understanding of human vision and diagnosis of vision anomalies. (2019-10-24)

Read to kids in Spanish; it'll help their English
Immigrant parents worry their children will struggle with reading and fret that as non-English speakers, they can't help. A new study in the journal Child Development shows that's simply not true. Reading to a young child in any language will help them learn to read in English. (2019-10-15)

Scientists set to start $10M project to create health diagnosis tool for bees
With Canada's honey bees dying, beekeepers and government regulators have been left struggling to find ways to quickly diagnose, manage and improve bee health. The solution could be a new bee health diagnosis tool being created as part of a research project led by bee genomics expert Associate Professor Amro Zayed, of York University, along with Professor Leonard Foster, of the University of British Columbia. The $10 million is set to start on Oct. 1. (2019-09-18)

Scientists measure precise proton radius to help resolve decade-old puzzle
York University researchers have made a precise measurement of the size of the proton -- a crucial step towards solving a mystery that has preoccupied scientists around the world for the past decade. The world's physicists have been scrambling to resolve the proton-radius puzzle. Now, a study to be published in the journal Science finds a new measurement for the size of the proton at 0.833 femtometers, which is just under one trillionth of a millimeter. (2019-09-05)

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