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Current Binge Drinking News and Events, Binge Drinking News Articles.
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Excessive alcohol consumption during the COVID-19 pandemic
The full impact of COVID-19 on alcohol use is not yet known, but rates have been rising during the first few months of the pandemic. There's an urgent need for public health and medical responses to address harmful alcohol use. (2020-11-02)

Researchers devise new method to get the lead out
Researchers in the lab of Daniel Giammar, in McKelvey School of Engineering have devised a simple, quick and inexpensive way to quantify how much lead is trapped by a water filter. (2020-10-30)

Dartmouth study examines well water testing promotion in pediatric primary care
Findings from a new study conducted by a team of researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published in the journal Preventive Medicine Reports, show that involving pediatric practices in the promotion of private well water testing can influence parental compliance. (2020-10-26)

Fish exposed to even small amounts of estrogen produce fewer males
UC assistant professor Latonya Jackson conducted experiments with North American freshwater fish called least killifish. She found that fish exposed to estrogen in concentrations of 5 nanograms per liter in controlled lab conditions had fewer males and produced fewer offspring. Scientists have found estrogen at as much as 16 times that concentration in streams adjacent to sewage treatment plants. (2020-10-23)

Cognitive behavioral therapy reduces insomnia symptoms among young drinkers
More than half of young adults at risk for alcohol-related harm report symptoms of insomnia. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the first-line treatments for insomnia, but it's never been tested on young adults who are actively drinking. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine evaluated CBT's effect on young adult binge drinkers with insomnia to determine if this treatment can improve their sleep and potentially affect alcohol use outcomes. (2020-10-20)

Drinking green tea and coffee daily linked to lower death risk in people with diabetes
Drinking plenty of both green tea and coffee is linked to a lower risk of dying from any cause among people with type 2 diabetes, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. (2020-10-20)

Study: More than 200 million Americans could have toxic PFAS in their drinking water
A peer-reviewed study by scientists at the Environmental Working Group estimates that more than 200 million Americans could have the toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS in their drinking water at a concentration of 1 part per trillion, or ppt, or higher. Independent scientific studies have recommended a safe level for PFAS in drinking water of 1 ppt, a standard that is endorsed by EWG. (2020-10-16)

Researchers step toward understanding how toxic PFAS chemicals spread from release sites
New lab studies are helping researchers to better understand how so called ''forever chemicals'' behave in soil and water, which can help in understanding how these contaminants spread. (2020-10-15)

Alcohol use changed right after COVID-19 lockdown
One in four adults reported a change in alcohol use almost immediately after stay-at-home orders were issued: 14% reported drinking more alcohol and reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those who did not drink and those whose use stayed the same. The 11% who decreased their drinking also had higher levels of stress and anxiety--suggesting that any change in alcohol use may be associated with mental health issues. (2020-10-13)

KIST addressing algal bloom in conventional water treatment facilities
An algal bloom refers to a phenomenon in which phytoplankton including blue-green algae rapidly proliferate in summer marked by high levels of solar irradiation and water temperature. It has lately been raising concerns due increased frequency of occurrence resulting from abnormally high temperatures and decreases in precipitation caused by climate change. Since there have toxic substances and these substances cannot be easily removed by a general water purification process, additional treatment using advanced water purification facilities and such is essential. (2020-10-12)

Hurricanes, heavy rains are critical for Hawai'i's groundwater supply
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists indicates that rain brought to the islands by hurricanes and Kona storms can often be the most important precipitation for re-supplying groundwater in many regions of the island of O'ahu. (2020-10-12)

How a toxic chromium species could form in drinking water
The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, brought much-needed attention to the problem of potentially toxic metals being released from drinking water distribution pipes when water chemistry changes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have investigated how hexavalent chromium, known as Cr(VI), can form in drinking water when corroded cast iron pipes interact with residual disinfectant. Their findings could suggest new strategies to control Cr(VI) formation in the water supply. (2020-09-30)

Drink coffee after breakfast, not before, for better metabolic control
The new study looked at the combined effects of disrupted sleep and caffeine on our metabolism - with surprising results. (2020-09-30)

Alcohol consumption rises sharply during pandemic shutdown
Anecdotal information has suggested that people are buying and consuming more alcohol during the pandemic shutdown. Now some of the first survey-based information shows that American adults have sharply increased their consumption of alcohol during the pandemic, with women increasing their heavy drinking episodes (four or more drinks within a couple of hours) by 41%. (2020-09-29)

ASU study finds association between screen time use, diet and other health factors
In a study recently published in BMC Public Health, Arizona State University researchers found that heavy users of screens -- defined as those who use screens an average of 17.5 hours per day -- reported the least healthful dietary patterns and the poorest health-related characteristics compared with moderate and light users, who averaged roughly 11.3 and 7 hours of screen use per day, respectively. (2020-09-28)

Low level alcohol use during pregnancy can impact child's brain development
A new study finds any alcohol use during pregnancy, even low levels, is associated with subtle, yet significant behavioural and psychological effects in children including anxiety, depression and poor attention. (2020-09-25)

Three genes predict success of naltrexone in alcohol dependence treatment
Of patients who seek treatment for alcohol use disorder, 60% to 80% relapse within a year. Taking the medication naltrexone reduces this number by a third. Yet only 20% of patients receive medications because they do not work well for everyone. Medical University of South Carolina researchers report in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research that measuring variants in just three brain genes makes it is possible to predict who will benefit from naltrexone. (2020-09-23)

Coffee associated with improved survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients
In a large group of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, consumption of a few cups of coffee a day was associated with longer survival and a lower risk of the cancer worsening, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report in a new study. (2020-09-17)

Vaping, marijuana use in 2019 rose in college-age adults
Vaping marijuana and vaping nicotine rose sharply in the past three years among college-age (19-22 years old) adults, according to 2019 survey results from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study. The percentage of college students who said they vaped marijuana in the past 30 days rose from 5.2% in 2017 to 14% in 2019. The corresponding percentages for their non-college-attending peers increased from 7.8% in 2017 to 17% in 2019. (2020-09-15)

Weight stigma predicts emotional distress and binge eating during COVID-19
New research from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the University of Minnesota shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the pandemic have higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress, eating as a coping strategy, and are more likely to binge-eat during COVID-19 compared to those who haven't experienced weight stigma. (2020-09-10)

Binge-drinkers' brains have to work harder to feel empathy for others
New research shows that binge-drinkers' brains have to put more effort into trying to feel empathy for other people in pain. (2020-09-10)

More than one drink a day may raise high blood pressure risk in adults with Type 2 diabetes
In a large study of adults with Type 2 diabetes, moderate drinking (defined as eight or more alcoholic beverages a week) was associated with a 60% or higher increased risk of high blood pressure. The severity of high blood pressure also increased with eight or more drinks per week. (2020-09-09)

New process for efficient removal of steroid hormones from water
Micropollutants contaminate the water worldwide. Among them are steroid hormones that cannot be eliminated efficiently by conventional processes. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed an innovative filtration system that combines a polymer membrane with activated carbon. The improved method is reported in Water Research (DOI:10.1016/j.watres.2020.116249). (2020-09-07)

Regional variations in freshwater overconsumption
Freshwater -- which falls to the earth as precipitation or exists beneath the surface as groundwater -- is desperately needed to sustain people, plants and animals. With an ever-increasing human population, water shortages are already occurring in many areas are only expected to get worse. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have estimated the freshwater supply and demand of about 11,000 water basins across the globe, determining that one-fourth of freshwater consumption exceeds regional capacities. (2020-09-02)

Legal performance-enhancing substances associated with future problematic alcohol use
A new study published in the journal Pediatrics found that young adults aged 18-26 who used legal performance-enhancing substances were significantly more likely to report several problematic alcohol use and drinking-related risk behaviors seven years later. This relationship was especially strong among men. (2020-09-01)

Yale trial addresses health disparities in alcohol treatment
Yale researchers are completing a first-of-its-kind clinical trial to test the efficacy of an automated bilingual alcohol screening and intervention tool for use in emergency departments (EDs). The computerized tool, administered to English- and Spanish-speaking Latino patient volunteers, is designed to address health disparities in the treatment of alcohol use disorders. (2020-09-01)

College students access eating disorders therapy via phone app
Studying college women with eating disorders, a team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that a phone-based app that delivers a form of cognitive behavioral therapy was an effective means of intervention in addressing specific disorders. (2020-08-31)

Imaging an estrogen related enzyme may help to predict obesity, self-control issues
Findings to be published in PNAS from a positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging study of the amygdala reveals that low levels of the enzyme aromatase, which catalyzes estrogen biosynthesis, are associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) and lower self-control, as measured by a standard personality test. (2020-08-31)

A coffee and catnap keep you sharp on the nightshift
A simple coffee and a quick catnap could be the cure for staying alert on the nightshift as new research from the University of South Australia shows that this unlikely combination can improve attention and reduce sleep inertia. (2020-08-28)

Premature deaths from alcoholic liver disease rising as gap between men and women narrows
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine identifies emerging patterns in the rate of and age at premature death from alcoholic (alcohol-associated) liver disease (ALD) in the US over the last two decades. Significantly, the study documents that since the early 2000s, ALD death rates among non-Hispanic whites, particularly women, have increased more rapidly than rates among non-Hispanic blacks. (2020-08-27)

Your in-laws' history of drinking problems could lead to alcohol issues of your own
A study of more than 300,000 couples in Sweden finds marriage to a spouse who grew up exposed to parental alcohol misuse increases a person's likelihood of developing a drinking problem. (2020-08-20)

Words used to describe alcohol intoxication may give clues to drinking habits
Penn State research suggests the language young adults use to describe the effects they feel from drinking may give insight into their drinking habits. (2020-08-19)

Smartphones can tell when you're drunk by analyzing your walk
Your smartphone can tell when you've had too much to drink by detecting changes in the way you walk, according to a new study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (2020-08-18)

Face mask insert could help diagnose conditions
Given current events, many people are wearing face masks to protect themselves and others. But that same face mask could someday also collect useful health information. Researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have demonstrated that a fiber inserted into an ordinary N95 face mask can collect compounds in exhaled breath aerosols for analysis. The new method could allow screening for disease biomarkers on a large scale. (2020-08-12)

Miscarriage risk increases each week alcohol is used in early pregnancy
Each week a woman consumes alcohol during the first five to 10 weeks of pregnancy is associated with an incremental 8% increase in risk of miscarriage, according to a study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers. (2020-08-10)

Absorbed plant MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication
In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. Drinking of HD accelerate the negative conversion of COVID-19 patients. (2020-08-05)

A practicable and reliable therapeutic strategy to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection
In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. Drinking of HD accelerate the negative conversion of COVID-19 patients. (2020-07-28)

Lead white pigments on Andean drinking vessels provide new historical context
Researchers studying lead white pigments on Andean ceremonial drinking vessels known as qeros have found new similarities among these artifacts that could help museums, conservators, historians and scholars better understand the timeline and production of these culturally significant items during the colonial period (1532-1821). (2020-07-27)

Lithium in drinking water linked with lower suicide rates
Naturally occurring lithium in public drinking water may have an anti-suicidal effect - according to a new study from Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) and the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London. Published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, the study collated research from around the world and found that geographical areas with relatively high levels or concentration of lithium in public drinking water had correspondingly lower suicide rates. (2020-07-27)

Fewer hip fractures may be associated with reductions in smoking, heavy drinking
A new study, which analyzed 40 years of Framingham Heart Study data, found an association between lowered rates of hip fractures and decreases in smoking and heavy drinking. These results indicate that modifiable lifestyle factors, along with treatments, may be beneficial to bone health. (2020-07-27)

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