Current Biochemistry News and Events

Current Biochemistry News and Events, Biochemistry News Articles.
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Researchers solve riddle of plant immune system
How do plants build resilience? An international research team led by the University of Göttingen studied the molecular mechanisms of the plant immune system. They were able to show a connection between a relatively unknown gene and resistance to pathogens. The results of the study were published in the journal The Plant Cell. (2021-02-16)

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex
Researchers at University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have developed a method for determining the arrangement and density of individual proteins in cells. In this way, they were able to prove the existence of an adhesion complex consisting of three proteins. (2021-02-15)

Iron release may contribute to cell death in heart failure
A process that releases iron in response to stress may contribute to heart failure, and blocking this process could be a way of protecting the heart, suggests a study in mice published today in eLife. (2021-02-02)

Basis for the essential cellular powerhouses
Researchers have solved the operating mode of the barrel pore protein assembly in the mitochondrial outer membrane (2021-01-15)

Switching DNA functions on and off by means of light
Biochemists at Münster University have developed a new strategy for controlling the biological functions of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) by means of light and therefore provide a tool to investigate processes which take place in cells. The results have been published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-12-28)

Clemson researcher identifies gene teams working in subregions of brain
You must first understand how something works normally before you can figure out why it's broken. Clemson University researcher Yuqing ''Iris'' Hang has identified six mini gene co-expression networks for a normally functioning brain. That will allow researchers to test each of the gene teams to see if gene pairs are changing in brain tumors or people with intellectual disabilities. (2020-12-16)

Arctic ground squirrels recycle nutrients to endure deep hibernation
By studying the body chemistry of hibernating Arctic ground squirrels, researchers have found that the animals are able to recycle their body's own nutrients to survive during a long, inactive winter. A University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study monitored ground squirrels in a laboratory environment for two years, measuring the almost undetectable flow of nutrients through their hibernating bodies. Researchers found that the animals were able to convert the free nitrogen they were creating into amino acids. (2020-12-07)

A recipe for protein footprinting
By publishing their method in the journal Nature Protocols, chemists have opened doors for fellow scientists to better address research questions related to Alzheimer's disease, the COVID-19 pandemic and more. (2020-12-07)

Identifying markers of COVID-19 infection using blood tests
This study identifies the values for six biochemical biomarkers that indicate a patient may be infected with SARS-COV-2 (COVID-19). The key novelty of this study lies in the fact that it was carried out using a blood test and can provide a determination in about 60 minutes. (2020-12-04)

RUDN University medics created a wound-healing gel with metabolic products of trichoderma
Researchers from the Department of Biochemistry of RUDN University developed a wound-healing gel based on a substance that is produced by Trichoderma fungi. (2020-12-04)

Protein molecules in cells function as miniature antennas
Researchers led by Josef Lazar from IOCB Prague have demonstrated that molecules of fluorescent proteins act as antennas with optical properties (i.e. the ability to absorb and emit light) dependent on their spatial orientation. First discovered in jellyfish, fluorescent proteins are nowadays widely used in studies of molecular processes in living cells and organisms. The newly described properties of these molecules will find applications in basic biological research as well as in novel drug discovery. (2020-12-02)

Researchers peer inside deadly pathogen's burglary kit
The bacterium that causes the tick-borne disease tularemia is a lean, mean infecting machine. It carries a relatively small genome, and a unique set of infectious tools, including a collection of chromosomal genes called 'the pathogenicity island.' Structural insights from Cryo-EM microscopy, appearing Nov. 19 in Molecular Cell, point to a way in which the bacterium's unique infectious machinery might be blocked. (2020-11-19)

Graz researchers identify biomarker for cardiovascular diseases
The role of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 3 in the blood pressure-regulating renin-angiotensin system was investigated in the inter-university cooperation project BioTechMed-Graz. The results could pave the way for new therapies for cardio-renal diseases. (2020-11-05)

UMD researchers develop tools to sharpen 3D view of large RNA molecules
University of Maryland scientists developed a method for generating high resolution 3D images of RNA, overcoming challenges limiting 3D analysis and imaging of RNA to only small molecules and pieces of RNA for the past 50 years. Published in Science Advances, the new method, which expands the scope of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, will enable researchers to understand the shape and structure of RNA molecules and learn how they interact with other molecules. (2020-10-07)

Cooked carrots can trigger allergic reactions
The consumption of raw carrots triggers allergic reactions in many people. Contrary to popular belief, cooked carrots can also have this effect. This was recently discovered by a research team at the University of Bayreuth. (2020-09-24)

Soil bogging caused by climate change adds to the greenhouse effect, says a RUDN University soil sci
A soil scientist from RUDN University studied soil samples collected at the Tibetan Plateau and discovered that high soil moisture content (caused by the melting of permafrost and glaciers) leads to further temperature increase. Therefore, the rate of soil bogging should be held back in order to slow down global warming. (2020-09-19)

FSU researchers develop new X-ray detection technology
Florida State University researchers have developed a new material that could be used to make flexible X-ray detectors that are less harmful to the environment and cost less than existing technologies. (2020-08-31)

Unlocking the cell enhances student learning of the genetic code
An open-source educational biotechnology called the 'Genetic Code Kit' allows students to interact with the molecular process inside cells in new ways. Researchers show that adapting state-of-the-art biotechnology for the classroom could transform how biology and biochemistry are taught to high school and undergraduate students. (2020-08-19)

COVID-19 research: Anti-viral strategy with double effect
When the SARS-CoV-2 virus penetrates human cells, it lets the human host cell produce proteins for it. One of these viral proteins, called PLpro, is essential for the replication and rapid spread of the virus. An international team of researchers led by Goethe University and University Hospital Frankfurt has now discovered that the pharmacological inhibition of this viral enzyme not only blocks virus replication but also strengthens the anti-viral immune response at the same time. (2020-07-29)

Green is more than skin-deep for hundreds of frog species
The through-and-through greenness of hundreds of frog species that can be found deep in their lymphatic fluid, soft tissues and even bones, comes from a clever biochemical workaround that combines a normally virus-fighting type of protein with a toxic byproduct of blood breakdown. The camouflage innovation has happened at least 40 times across 11 families of frog and toad. (2020-07-13)

Malaria's secret to surviving in the blood uncovered
New research from the Francis Crick Institute has found how the malaria parasite protects itself from toxic compounds in red blood cells. (2020-06-30)

Earth's species have more in common than previously believed
In the largest mapping of proteins ever to be conducted across different species, an international team of researchers have analysed and compared the proteins of 100 animal, plant and bacterial species. The different life forms appear to have remarkable similarities when looking at their proteins. The new study has also doubled the number of experimentally confirmed proteins. (2020-06-17)

Two anti-inflammatory drugs found that inhibit the replication of the COVID-19 virus
Researchers at the URV have used computer techniques to analyse whether 6,466 drugs authorized by various drug agencies for both human and veterinary use could be used to inhibit the M-pro enzyme. The study demonstrates that a human and a veterinary anti-inflammatory drug - Carprofen and Celecoxib - inhibit a key enzyme in the replication and transcription of the virus responsible for COVID-19. The results of the work have been validated by the initiative COVIDMoonshot. (2020-05-27)

Researchers find one-two punch may help fight against Salmonella
Researchers found that dephostatin does not kill Salmonella or stop it from growing. Instead, dephostatin prevents Salmonella from causing infection in two ways: it blocks its ability to resist being killed by immune cells and it enhances its sensitivity to colistin. (2020-05-14)

Scientists shed light on essential carbon-fixing machinery in bacteria
Scientists have been studying cyanobacteria and its many potential applications for decades, from cutting CO2 emissions to creating a substitute for oil-based plastics, but there wasn't a deep understanding of the full life cycle and metabolism of specialized compartments within these common bacteria -- until now. (2020-05-06)

Insights into why loud noise is bad for your health
Two new mouse studies provide new insight into how noise exposure can lead to high blood pressure and cancer-related DNA damage. (2020-04-27)

Soil in wounds can help stem deadly bleeding
New UBC research shows for the first time that soil silicates--the most abundant material on the Earth's crust--play a key role in blood clotting. (2020-04-27)

Tetracycline-family antibiotics may offer early diagnostic for degenerative eye disease
Utilizing human cadaver retinas containing drusen, the researchers used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to measure the light emission from tetracycline staining within those ocular mineral deposits. (2020-04-21)

New 'toolbox' for urological cancer detection
Researchers from Ghent University, Belgium, together with researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, have developed a new method for biomarker discovery of urological cancers. The method enables timely diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Urological cancers include e.g. prostate, bladder and kidney cancers. (2020-04-16)

Mutation reduces energy waste in plants
In a way, plants are energy wasters: in order to protect themselves from excessive electron transport, they continuously quench light energy and don't use it for photosynthesis and biomass production. A mutation can make them work more efficiently, as was discovered by a team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). (2020-04-08)

Daughter cells carry memory from mother on decision to divide
Researchers at CU Boulder have found that it's actually the mother cell that determines if its daughter cells will divide. The finding, explained in a new study out today in Science, sheds new light on the cell cycle using modern imaging technologies, and could have implications for cancer drug therapy treatments. (2020-04-02)

Scientists reveal how proteins team up to repair DNA
Scientists have revealed an important mechanism in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, according to new research published today in eLife. (2020-03-24)

Coronavirus testing kits to be developed using SFU-invented RNA imaging technology
Simon Fraser University researchers will use their pioneering imaging technology -- called Mango, for its bright color -- to develop coronavirus testing kits. They're among a small set of Canadian researchers who responded to the rapid funding opportunity recently announced by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to help address COVID-19. (2020-03-19)

Removing belly fat before it sticks to you
University of Cincinnati researchers are producing in the lab a human protein tasked with removing triglycerides from the blood stream. Unlocking the secrets of human protein APOA 5 gives us a leg up in treating heart disease. (2020-03-19)

Scientists visualize the structure of a key enzyme that makes triglycerides
The first structure of a lipin enzyme, which carries out an important step in the production of triglycerides, the main reservoir for long-term energy storage, will help scientists to better understand how lipins regulate the production of triglycerides. (2020-03-11)

Researchers make asthma breakthrough
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have made a breakthrough that may eventually lead to improved therapeutic options for people living with asthma. The researchers have uncovered a critical role for a protein (Caspase-11), which had previously never been implicated in the disease, and which may offer a promising target for drug designers. (2020-02-26)

Discovery of entirely new class of RNA caps in bacteria
The group of Dr. Hana Cahová of the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, has discovered an entirely new class of dinucleoside polyphosphate 5'RNA caps in bacteria and described the function of alarmones and their mechanism of function. The discovery was recently published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-02-26)

McMaster researchers uncover hidden antibiotic potential of cannabis
The research team found that CBG had antibacterial activity against drug-resistant MRSA. It prevented the ability of that bacteria to form biofilms, which are communities of microorganisms that attach to each other and to surfaces; and it destroyed preformed biofilms and cells resistant to antibiotics. CBG achieved this by targeting the cell membrane of the bacteria. These findings in the laboratory were supported when mice with an MRSA infection were given CBG. (2020-02-26)

Discovery of bacterial ancestor yields new insight on calcium channels
The discovery of a calcium channel that is likely a 'missing link' in the evolution of mammalian calcium channels has been reported today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-02-25)

Unexpected insights into the dynamic structure of mitochondria
As power plants and energy stores, mitochondria are essential components of almost all cells in plants, fungi and animals. Until now, it has been assumed that these functions underlie a static structure of mitochondrial membranes. Researchers at the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf and the UCLA Los Angeles have now discovered that the inner membranes of mitochondria are not static, but constantly change their structure every few seconds in living cells. (2020-02-18)

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