Current Bioethics News and Events

Current Bioethics News and Events, Bioethics News Articles.
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If healthy people are purposefully infected with COVID-19 for the sake of science, they should be paid
Multidisciplinary team of international experts suggests participants should receive a ''substantial'' amount, be paid ethically. (2021-02-05)

Free all non-violent criminals jailed on minor drug offences, say experts
Non-violent offenders serving time for drug use or possession should be freed immediately and their convictions erased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed The American Journal of Bioethics. (2021-01-07)

College football players underestimate risk of injury and concussion
College football players may underestimate their risk of injury and concussion, according to a new study published today in JAMA Network Open. Christine Baugh, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and member of the CU Center for Bioethics and Humanities, is the corresponding author of the article, ''Accuracy of US College Football Players' Estimates of Their Risk of Concussion or Injury.'' (2020-12-29)

The ethics of human challenge trials
The first human challenge trial to test COVID-19 treatments and vaccines is set to begin in January in the United Kingdom. Daniel Hausman, a research professor at Rutgers Center for Population-Level Bioethics discussed the findings of his recently published paper in the Journal of Medicine & Philosophy examining ethical issues of challenge trials. (2020-12-09)

Accounting for 'research fatigue' in human studies
An article published in Bioethics examines the topic of research fatigue--or psychological and emotional exhaustion both towards and as a result of participating in research. The article is meant to initiate a conversation about research fatigue experienced by marginalized communities and how the research community should respond to it. (2020-11-18)

New method developed by Lithuanian scientists can reach 90% accuracy in detecting melanoma
A team of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences proposed a non-invasive method for detection of melanoma. A patented computer-aided diagnostic system developed by Lithuanian scientists proved to be more than 90% accurate in detecting malignancy in diagnostic images of skin lesions acquired from 100 patients. (2020-11-09)

As genome-editing trials become more common, informed consent is changing
As public interest and expanded research in human genome editing grows, many questions remain about ethical, legal and social implications of the technology. People who are seriously ill may overestimate the benefits of early clinical trials while underestimating the risks. This makes properly understanding informed consent, the full knowledge of risks and benefits of treatments, especially important. (2020-10-12)

Unknowns and uncertainties raise ethical concerns for UK egg freezing
A lack of clear, accessible, and transparent data creates a series of ethical issues for egg freezing, according to a new briefing note from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. (2020-09-29)

CU researchers call for national ethics guidelines when student health surveys uncover suicide-risk
In a report published today in the highly influential American Journal of Bioethics, the researchers describe a student health survey team that discovered a Colorado school with extremely high rates of suicide risk, and a lack of ethical guidance on whether or how to intervene. The researchers are calling for national ethics guidelines when student health surveys uncover suicide-risk ''hot spots.'' (2020-09-18)

New in the Hastings Center Report: Ethical challenges of the opioid crisis
The nationwide surge in drug abuse predates the Covid-19 pandemic but has risen to new highs during it. Causes of the crisis--physician prescribing habits and societal problems like poverty and joblessness--and the implications solutions may have for pain treatment, are explored in three essays. (2020-09-01)

Lottery for ventilators
In times of acute shortages, the orthodoxy in healthcare is for scarce resources to be allocated based on who has the best chance of survival. However, Dr Diego Silva, from the University of Sydney, argues this simple utility calculus is unjust because it exacerbates existing social inequities. In a paper published in Chest Journal, Dr Silva proposes a radical departure from current convention by arguing ventilators should be allocated to COVID-19 patients via a lottery. (2020-08-05)

Tackling the bioethics challenges raised by COVID-19
The diverse situations experienced by health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic often present serious ethical challenges. From the allocation of resources and triage protocols to health-care worker and patient rights and the management of clinical trials, new ethical questions have come to the forefront of today's global public health emergency. (2020-08-03)

How should hospitals ask patients for donations?
A new study looks for the first time at patients' views of hospital fundraising, including legally allowable practices that encourage physicians to work with their hospital's fundraising professionals. (2020-07-21)

Ethical recommendations for triage of COVID-19 patients
An international expert group led by Mathias Wirth, Professor of Systematic Theology and Ethics at the University of Bern, has developed recommendations for avoiding triage of COVID-19 patients in extreme situations. The recommendations should support medical personnel in difficult decisions during a second wave of the infection and ensure better patient care. (2020-07-16)

Experts, advocates publish guidance for research on HIV, co-infections in pregnancy
Changing practices in the HIV/co-infections research community so that women, providers, and policy makers can make evidence-informed decisions around the use of medications during pregnancy is the goal of the new report, Ending the Evidence Gap for Pregnant Women around HIV and Co-infections: A Call to Action, issued today by the Pregnancy and HIV/AIDS: Seeking Equitable Study (PHASES) Working Group - an international and interdisciplinary team of 26 experts. (2020-07-10)

Is COVID-19 widening the gender gap in academic medicine?
A new study finds that fewer women were first authors on COVID-19-related research papers published in the first half of this year. The findings suggest a worsening gender gap in academic medicine as women are already underrepresented among authors of medical research. (2020-07-09)

Does genomics perpetuate inequality?
A new Hastings Center special report takes a critical look at the role of genomics in perpetuating racism and inequality. (2020-07-08)

Social distancing and dying alone
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to drastic changes in how hospitals provide end-of-life care to patients and their families. With strict no-visiting limitations in place in an effort to stem contagion, patients have been dying alone. (2020-06-29)

Nation must prepare for COVID-19 related drug shortages
A new paper published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the nation's current shortage of vitally needed medications, and how this dangerous situation is being made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors provide recommendations on how clinicians and institutions might address potential scarcities of essential medications during the current public health crisis. (2020-06-11)

New in Ethics and Human Research
Covid-19: Why Challenge Trials of Vaccines Could be Ethical, Despite Severe Risks, Equitably Sharing the Benefits and Burdens of Research. Early-view articles and the May-June 2020 issue. (2020-06-10)

Responding to COVID-19: New early-view articles in the Hastings Center report
Responding to COVID-19: Vaccine rationing and social justice; ethical challenges for nurses; and more. Early-view essays in the Hastings Center Report. (2020-06-04)

As hospitals walk the tightrope of patient data-sharing, one system offers a new balance
Every major medical center in America sits on a gold mine of patient data that could be worth millions of dollars to companies that could use it to develop new treatments and technologies. A new framework could help them do so more responsibly, going beyond the minimum legal requirements and respecting patients by giving them more say in how their individual data may be used. (2020-05-28)

COVID-19 could spell the end of an egalitarian National Health Service
A return to the principles of equality and universality of care that informed the NHS 70 years ago could be impossible. (2020-04-27)

University of the Witwatersrand publishes first clinical data on COVID-19 in South Africa
Health professionals will face difficult ethical decisions when it comes to dealing with COVID-19 patients. (2020-04-27)

Is it wrong to prioritize younger patients with COVID-19?
With services overburdened, healthcare professionals are having to decide who should receive treatment. But is it wrong to prioritise younger patients with COVID-19? Two experts debate the issue in The BMJ this week. (2020-04-22)

Action needed to ensure research is carried out ethically in global health emergencies
Governments, funders, and research bodies must take action to ensure that research is undertaken ethically during global health emergencies, says a new report from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. (2020-01-27)

Moral distress and moral strength among clinicians in health care systems
Nurse burnout impacts both nurses and patients, and significantly influences the retention of nurses in the healthcare setting, research shows. But could burnout be a symptom of something larger? (2019-09-23)

Overweight Danes are more likely to have overweight dogs according to new research
A new study from the University of Copenhagen reports that the prevalence of overweight dogs is markedly larger among overweight owners than among normal weight owners. Part of the explanation lies in whether treats are used as training tools or ''hygge-snacks''. It is the first major study on canine obesity in Denmark. (2019-09-19)

Gender equality report card reveals systematic underrepresentation of women in STEM
The New York Stem Cell Foundation and the University of Michigan have used the NYSCF Institutional Report Card for Gender Equality to evaluate the representation of women in STEM across more than 500 institutions. NYSCF designed and collected the Report Cards and the University of Michigan analyzed the over 1,200 Report Cards received. Findings indicate that promotion, recruitment, and retention of women to senior roles are lacking, as are policies to support women in science. (2019-09-05)

NZ researchers call for gender binary in elite sports to be abandoned
Existing gender categories in sport should perhaps be abandoned in favor of a more 'nuanced' approach in the new transgender era, University of Otago researchers say. (2019-07-22)

Yale-developed scorecard promotes better clinical trial data sharing
A tool developed by researchers at Yale, Stanford, and Bioethics International can promote greater sharing of clinical trial data by pharmaceutical companies. While nearly one-third of the companies that the researchers assessed met standards for sharing data, others could be more transparent to the benefit of science and the public, the researchers said. (2019-07-10)

People using third-party apps to analyze personal genetic data
The burgeoning field of personal genetics appeals to people who want to learn more about themselves, their family and their propensity for diseases. More and more consumers are using services like 23andMe to learn about their genetic blueprint. (2019-06-13)

When science and politics collide: Support for enhancing FDA independence
A new paper by Eli Y. Adashi, Rohit Rajan, and I. Glenn Cohen appears in Science this week and picks up where those papers left off. Adashi, Rajan, and Cohen write that the crucial mission of the FDA, which has been to make science-based decisions about drug and medical device safety since 1938, has recently been undermined and threatened by politically motivated interference from congressional legislators. (2019-05-16)

Nursing home cameras aim to protect the vulnerable but present ethical dilemmas
With reports of crimes against nursing home residents gaining media attention around the country, seven states have passed laws regulating the use of cameras in care facilities. An assistant professor in the University of Washington School of Social Work outlines the list of legal and moral issues that surveillance raises. (2019-05-07)

Pig experiment raises ethical questions around brain damage
The brain is more resilient than previously thought. In a groundbreaking experiment published in this week's issue of Nature, neuroscientists created an artificial circulation system that successfully restored some functions and structures in pig brains. The result challenges the notion that mammalian brains are fully and irreversibly damaged by a lack of oxygen. (2019-04-18)

Scientists restore some functions in a pig's brain hours after death
Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death, Yale scientists report April 18 in the journal Nature. (2019-04-17)

Government and NHS leaders could do more to encourage collaborative relationships between healthcare
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has published a briefing note outlining the factors that can contribute to disagreements between parents and healthcare staff about the care and treatment of critically ill babies and young children. It concludes that the Government and NHS leaders could do more to foster good, collaborative relationships between parents and healthcare staff across the UK. (2019-04-03)

New in Ethics & Human Research, March-April 2019
Anticipatory waivers of consent for pediatric biobanking, a case study of unethical US experiments in Guatemala, and more in the current issue of Ethics & Human Research. (2019-03-25)

Researchers key to advance care planning with cancer clinical trial patients
Cancer clinical trials are an important option for patients with cancer. Yet, once a trial ends, patients still need care plans. Little is known at what point during clinical trial transitions to initiate advance planning discussions or how to educate research teams to communicate with and prepare patient-participants and their families for the next steps after they leave a cancer clinical trial. (2019-02-19)

Cell lines deserve unique considerations when creating research protections, authors say
New rules recently went into effect, seeking to protect patients who donate tissue samples for research in the age of genetic sequencing. But this rule could have unintended consequences for certain critical types of biospecimens. (2019-01-31)

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