Current Biofilms News and Events

Current Biofilms News and Events, Biofilms News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 15 | 599 Results
CUHK physicists discover new route to active matter self-organisation
An international team led by Professor Yilin Wu, Associate Professor of the Department of Physics at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has made a novel conceptual advance in the field of active matter science. The team discovered a new route in which the self-organisation of active fluids in space and time can be controlled by a single material property called viscoelasticity. (2021-02-20)

Secret to how cholera adapts to temperature revealed
Scientists have discovered an essential protein in cholera-causing bacteria that allows them to adapt to changes in temperature, according to a study published today in eLife. (2021-02-16)

Smectite promotes probiotic biofilm formation in gut for cancer immunotherapy
Orally administrating probiotics is ineffective due to the poor inhabitation of exogenous bacteria in host intestines. Chinese scientists report that smectite, a type of mineral clay and classical anti-diarrhoea drug, can promote the expansion of probiotics in the murine gut that subsequently elicits anti-tumor immune responses. Their findings suggest a novel approach to specifically enrich probiotics in the body, with high translational potential for cancer immunotherapy. (2021-02-10)

Biosensors require robust antifouling protection
Some promising biosensors and medical devices work well within pristine laboratory environments but may stop working once exposed to real-world conditions. A thick layer of foulants will quickly cover biosensors, and there is no good way to revive them once they quit working. Essentially, a biosensor is only as good as its antifouling properties. In APL Materials, researchers review a variety of approaches developed to combat fouling. (2021-02-02)

Iron-carrying extracellular vesicles are key to respiratory viral-bacterial co-infection
The vesicles associate with bacterial cells and supply them with essential nutrients, promoting the growth of expansive bacterial communities. (2021-01-26)

Nanocrystals that eradicate bacteria biofilm
POSTECH-UNIST joint research team finds ways to control the surface texture of nanostructures. (2021-01-08)

Scientists discover slimy microbes that may help keep coral reefs healthy
Microbes living within the slimy biofilms of some coral species may help protect the coral against excess nitrogen levels, according to research from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), in collaboration with colleagues in Cuba. (2021-01-08)

Bacteriophage has important role in agriculture and aquaculture
Crop plants and animals can be infected by bacterial pathogens that reduce yield, cause food wastage, and carry human pathogens that spread disease on consumption. Bacteriophage can play an important role in microbial control (2021-01-04)

Groups of bacteria can work together to better protect crops and improve their growth
Certain bacteria, known as plant-growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), can improve plant health or protect them from pathogens and are used commercially to help crops. To further improve agricultural yields, it is helpful to identify factors that can improve PGPB behavior. (2020-12-28)

Industrial waste is reused to produce alternatives to plastic
Researchers at São Paulo State University reused bacterial cellulose scraps usually thrown away by manufacturers of wound dressings to make strong biodegradable film for food packaging (2020-12-14)

Development of the first biohybrid artificial retina built with silk fibroin and retinal cells.
An international research led by the Complutense University of Madrid has taken a further step to solve Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)-derived blidness problem with the development of the first biohybrid artificial retina built with silk fibroin and retinal cells. (2020-12-11)

Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics
Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most commonly used. Scientists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany have discovered a molecule that influences the antibiotic-resistance of cholera bacteria. They have published their results in the scientific journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-11-27)

Bacilli and their enzymes show prospects for several applications
This publication is devoted to the des­cription of different microbial enzymes with prospects for practical application. The interest in microbial enzymes is due to the inability of animal and plant proteolytic enzymes to fully meet the needs of the global population. Microorganisms are an accessible source of enzymes owing to their wide variety, the safety of handling, ease of cultivation, and genetic transformability. (2020-10-30)

Artificial cyanobacterial biofilm can sustain green ethylene production for over a month
Ethylene is one of the most important and widely used organic chemicals. The research group at the University of Turku led by Associate Professor Yagut Allahverdiyeva-Rinne has designed a thin-layer artificial biofilm with embedded cyanobacterial cell factories which were specifically engineered for photosynthetic production of ''green'' ethylene. The fabricated biofilms have sustained ethylene production for up to 40 days. (2020-10-15)

Evolution: No social distancing at the beginning of life
Bacteria are a dominant form of life that inhabit every environment on Earth. This includes human bodies, where they outnumber our cells and genes and regulate our existence for good or bad. Bacteria are regularly viewed as simple, single-celled organisms. As bacteria are ancient, it is widely accepted that a bacteria-like, unicellular being was the first life. Recent work published in 'Molecular Biology and Evolution' by an international research team challenges these views. (2020-10-13)

Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
Studying bacterial biofilms, EPFL scientists have discovered that mechanical forces within them are sufficient to deform the soft material they grow on, e.g. biological tissues, suggesting a ''mechanical'' mode of bacterial infection. (2020-10-08)

Magnetic 'T-Budbots' made from tea plants kill and clean biofilms (video)
Biofilms -- microbial communities that form slimy layers on surfaces -- are difficult to treat and remove, often because the microbes release molecules that block the entry of antibiotics and other therapies. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made magnetically propelled microbots derived from tea buds, which they call ''T-Budbots,'' that can dislodge biofilms, release an antibiotic to kill bacteria, and clean away the debris. (2020-09-23)

Why do hospital germs bind more strongly to certain surfaces than to others?
Multiresistant bacteria are a serious problem in hospital and healthcare environments. By forming a biofilm, these pathogens can colonize door handles and light switches and their presence on medical implants can lead to serious cases of post-operative infection. A team of physicists at Saarland University has now shown why hospital germs adhere strongly to surfaces from which water simply rolls off, but bind so poorly to surfaces that are easily wetted by water. (2020-09-16)

Stopping tooth decay before it starts -- without killing bacteria
Eating sugar or other carbohydrates after dental cleanings causes oral bacteria to quickly rebuild plaque and to produce acids that corrode tooth enamel, leading to cavities. Today, scientists report a treatment that could someday stop plaque and cavities from forming in the first place, using a new type of cerium nanoparticle formulation. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-17)

Shock to bacteria activates nature's electrical grid
The ocean floor and the ground beneath our feet are riddled with tiny nanowires -- 1/100,000th the width of a human hair -- created by billions of bacteria that can generate electric currents from organic waste. In new research published Aug. 17 in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, Yale researchers describe how this hidden power grid could be activated with a short jolt of electric field. (2020-08-17)

NTU develops peptide that makes drug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again
Scientists at NTU Singapore have developed a synthetic peptide that can make multidrug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again when used together with traditional antibiotics, offering hope for the prospect of a combination treatment strategy to tackle certain antibiotic-tolerant infections. On its own, the synthetic antimicrobial peptide can also kill bacteria that have grown resistant to antibiotics. (2020-08-06)

How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that the bacterium C. perfringens modulates the structure of its biofilm at different temperatures by regulating the expression of the novel extracellular protein BsaA. They showed the number of BsaA-producing cells decreases when the temperature increases from 25°C to 37°C, and BsaA-producing cells cover non-BsaA-producing cells to provide tolerance to external stresses. These findings help us understand how bacteria adapt to their environment to survive. (2020-08-03)

Medieval medicine remedy could provide new treatment for modern day infections
Antibiotic resistance is an increasing battle for scientists to overcome, as more antimicrobials are urgently needed to treat biofilm-associated infections. However scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick say research into natural antimicrobials could provide candidates to fill the antibiotic discovery gap. (2020-07-28)

Metal-breathing bacteria could transform electronics, biosensors, and more
When the Shewanella oneidensis bacterium ''breathes'' in certain metal and sulfur compounds anaerobically, the way an aerobic organism would process oxygen, it produces materials that could be used to enhance electronics, electrochemical energy storage, and drug-delivery devices. The ability of this bacterium to produce molybdenum disulfide -- a material that is able to transfer electrons easily, like graphene -- is the focus of research published in Biointerphases by a team of engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. (2020-07-28)

Where are arctic mosquitoes most abundant in Greenland and why?
Bzz! It's mosquito season in Greenland. June and July is when Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) are in peak abundance, buzzing about the tundra. While Arctic mosquitoes serve as an important food source to other animals, they are notorious for their role as pests to humans and wildlife. Yet, these mosquitoes spend most of their lives in an aquatic environment in shallow, tundra ponds. A Dartmouth study finds that Arctic mosquito populations appear to be driven by food quality rather than predator density. (2020-07-23)

Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections
Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes. (2020-07-23)

Advancing knowledge on archaea
An open-source data platform for researchers studying archaea is paving the way for new insights and educational opportunities. (2020-07-20)

Salmonella biofilm protein causes autoimmune responses -- Possible link with Alzheimer's
Scientists from the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and Temple University (Philadelphia, US) have demonstrated that a Salmonella biofilm protein can cause autoimmune responses and arthritis in animals. (2020-07-09)

Targeting bacterial biofilm lynchpin prevents, treats recalcitrant biofilm-mediated infections
A new study highlights two approaches with substantive efficacy and potential for broad application to combat biofilm-mediated diseases. (2020-07-07)

Harmful microbes found on sewer pipe walls
Can antibiotic-resistant bacteria escape from sewers into waterways and cause a disease outbreak? A new Rutgers study, published in the journal Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, examined the microbe-laden ''biofilms'' that cling to sewer walls, and even built a simulated sewer to study the germs that survive within. (2020-07-06)

Washing away stubborn biofilms using fungal cleaning products
Growing inside pipes and on the surfaces of medical devices, bacterial biofilms cause major headaches for the food processing industry and healthcare professionals alike. Within biofilms, bacteria are protected from chemicals and antibiotics and can be almost impossible to eliminate. But researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that enzymes produced by yeasts, called biosurfactants, can dissolve stubborn biofilms and boost the efficacy of current chemical treatments, lessening their toxicity and environmental impacts. (2020-06-22)

New family of enzymes reveals the Achilles' heel of fungal pathogens
Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal species that can cause serious illnesses in immunocompromised individuals. Infections caused by A. fumigatus are difficult to eliminate because the fungus often aggregates into small communities called ''biofilms,'' which protect the pathogens from antifungal agents and help the fungus evade the immune system. GlycoNet scientists Drs. Lynne Howell and Don Sheppard recently identified a key enzyme in A. fumigatus that could lead to therapeutics to treat these fungal infections. (2020-06-17)

Water bacteria have a green thumb
Research team from University of Jena discover new natural products that bacteria in water use to regulate the growth of competing organisms. (2020-06-12)

Potential high-risk clones identified among S. maltophilia strains in European hospitals
UAB researchers, based on a collection of clinical isolates from several countries, have established a link between the cell-to-cell communication system (the quorum sensing) and the virulence and resistance phenotypes in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. In addition they have identified potential high-risk clones circulating worldwide. (2020-06-10)

New functions of a protein may improve biocontrol methods in sustainable agriculture
The laboratory of the UMA 'BacBio' has proved that Bacillus subtilis cells, when deprived of an amyloid protein (TasA), exhibit a range of cytological anomalies and dysfunctions leading to their premature death. A discovery that enables progress to be made in understanding the role of these proteins, widely distributed in the microbial world, and helps improve biological control methods in sustainable agriculture. This research has been recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. (2020-05-14)

New imaging method gives insights into how bacteria move and exchange genetic information
Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in advancing our understanding of how bacteria move and perform genetic exchange -- that could potentially lead to the development of new antimicrobial drugs. (2020-05-06)

Scientists observe bacteria tumble their way out of surface traps
While tracing the movement of Escherichia coli, a team of French researchers noticed that near solid surfaces, the bacteria run in circles. Loop after loop, the tracing almost looks like an Olympic figure skating rink before the Zamboni irons the sheet of ice smooth. Breaking down E. coli's routine step by step, the scientists identified a signature move -- surface tumbling. The work appears May 5 in the Biophysical Journal. (2020-05-05)

New drug formulation could treat Candida infections
With antimicrobial resistance (AMR) increasing around the world, new research led by the University of Bristol has shown a new drug formulation could possibly be used in antifungal treatments against Candida infections. (2020-04-28)

They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory
Biologists studying communities of bacteria have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory. Using light, researchers were able to encode complex memory patterns and visualize cells with memory. The discovery reveals surprising parallels between low-level single-celled organisms and sophisticated neurons that process memory in the human brain. The finding also provides a starting path for scientists to one day design basic computing systems with living organisms such as bacteria. (2020-04-27)

Cholera studies reveal mechanisms of biofilm formation and hyperinfectivity
Free-swimming cholera bacteria are much less infectious than bacteria in biofilms, aggregates of bacterial cells that form on surfaces. This accounts for the surprising effectiveness of filtering water through cloth, such as a folded sari, which can reduce infections dramatically in places where the disease is endemic, despite the fact that individual cholera bacteria easily pass through such a filter. A new study goes a long way toward explaining the hyperinfectivity of cholera biofilms. (2020-04-20)

Page 1 of 15 | 599 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.