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Current Biological Invasion News and Events, Biological Invasion News Articles.
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Woodpeckers' drumming: Conserved meaning despite different structure over the years
How do animals produce and perceive biological information in sounds? To what extent does the acoustic structure and its associated meaning change during evolution? An international team led by the University of Zurich and the University of Saint-Etienne reconstructed the evo-lutionary history of an animal communication system, focusing on drumming signals of woodpeckers. (2020-10-02)

Invasion by non-native insects expected to increase 36 percent worldwide by 2050
An international team of scientists established that biological invasions will increase by 36 percent between 2005 and 2050. Modeling suggests that Europe is likely to experience the strongest biological invasions, followed by Asia, North America and South America. (2020-10-01)

Aquatic hitchhikers: Using mobile technology to predict invasive species transmission
A new University of Washington study uses passive data from a fishing technology company to model the movement of anglers and predict where aquatic invasive species may be spreading. (2020-09-29)

Coconut rhinoceros beetle makes unexpected 'host shift' to Guam's cycad trees
Researchers at the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam have documented what biologists call a ''host shift'' of the coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam. The beetle, first documented as an invasive species in Guam in 2007, has been devastating the island's ubiquitous coconut trees and is now also burrowing into Guam's endangered native cycad tree, Cycas micronesica. (2020-09-16)

Common cold combats influenza
As the flu season approaches, a strained public health system may have a surprising ally -- the common cold virus. Rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of common colds, can prevent the flu virus from infecting airways by jumpstarting the body's antiviral defenses, Yale researchers report Sept. 4 in the journal The Lancet Microbe. (2020-09-04)

Natural pest control saving billions
Biological control of insect pests - where 'natural enemies' keep pests at bay - is saving farmers in Asia and the Pacific billions of dollars, according to University of Queensland-led research. Dr Kris Wyckhuys from UQ's School of Biological Sciences said biological control involved the careful release of an exotic natural enemy from a pest's native habitat. (2020-09-03)

New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. In an article recently featured in the journal Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, Nishant Malik, assistant professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences, outlined the new technique he developed and showed how shifting monsoon patterns led to the demise of the Indus Valley Civilization, a Bronze Age civilization contemporary to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt. (2020-09-03)

Biological control agents can protect soybeans from Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS)
Recently, Mirian Pimentel, a PhD student, and a group of plant pathologists at Southern Illinois University, discovered a promising new tool to fight sudden death syndrome (SDS). They observed that several biological control agents (BCA), or beneficial fungi, were able to substantially reduce the growth of the causal pathogen agent of SDS. In some cases, these agents even overgrew the pathogen, parasitized it, and displayed evidence of ''feeding'' on it. (2020-09-02)

Engineers uncover biomechanical effects of skin rubbing
Understanding the skin damage caused by rubbing could lead to better topical skin treatments and help prevent the formation of new routes for viral and bacterial infection. (2020-08-28)

Daylight study reveals how animals adapt between seasons
Scientists have discovered how a biological switch helps animals make the seasonal changes crucial for survival, such as growing a warm winter coat and adjusting body temperatures. (2020-08-27)

Less "sticky" cells become more cancerous
In cooperation with colleagues from Germany, Italy and the Netherlands, researchers at Leipzig University have investigated the structure of tumour tissue and the behaviour of tumour cells in detail, gaining important insights that could improve cancer diagnosis and therapy in the future. (2020-08-25)

Australia's wish list of exotic pets
Unsustainable trade of species is the major pathway for the introduction of invasive alien species at distant localities at higher frequencies. It is also a major driver of over-exploitation of wild populations. In a new study, published in the open-access journal Neobiota, scientists estimate the desire of Australians to own non-native and/or illegal pets and the major trends in this practice. In addition, the team suggests ways to improve biosecurity awareness in the country. (2020-08-20)

Sortilin may hold the key to combat pancreatic cancer more effectively
Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis; it is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. In a novel study published in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, scientists report the discovery of an increased level of the neuroprotein sortilin in pancreatic cancer cells that may open up the way to developing more effective treatment. (2020-08-20)

The structural basis of Focal Adhesion Kinase activation on lipid membranes unravelled
* Patients with glioma - a very common type of tumour originating in the brain - see improvement in survival rates with combined treatment of radiotherapy plus temozolomide * Researchers found a novel mechanism on how tumours evade chemotherapy through genomic rearrangements of the MGMT DNA repair gene * This finding is potentially relevant for updating the methods used to monitor temozolomide efficacy. Genomic rearrangement could be a marker to be detected in blood samples and help make therapeutic decisions (2020-08-11)

Plant size and habitat traits influence cycad susceptibility to invasive species
A long-term study on cycads in Guam has revealed how rapidly invasive species devastated the native Cycas micronesica species and the key factors that have influenced the plant's mortality. The research -- conducted by the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam and the College of Micronesia-FSM -- is published in the May 2020 issue of Diversity, a peer-reviewed journal published by MDPI. (2020-08-03)

SARS-CoV-2 infection of non-neuronal cells, not neurons, may drive loss of smell in patients with COVID-19
A new study of human olfactory cells has revealed that viral invasion of supportive cells in the nasal cavity might be driving the loss of smell seen in some patients with COVID-19. The findings show that non- (2020-07-24)

How immune cells activate the killer mode
Freiburg researchers find missing link in immune response. (2020-07-20)

Pine beetles successful no matter how far they roam -- with devastating effects
Whether they travel only a few metres or tens of kilometres to a new host tree, female pine beetles use different strategies to find success--with major negative consequences for pine trees, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2020-07-16)

Oncotarget: The Golgi protein TMEM165 controls migration/invasion for carcinoma
The cover for issue 28 of Oncotarget features Figure 5, 'TMEM165 expression levels alters N-linked glycosylation,' by Murali, et al., and reported that the TMEM165 protein was not detected in non-malignant matched breast tissues and was detected in invasive ductal breast carcinoma tissues by mass spectrometry. (2020-07-14)

Breast cancer cells turn killer immune cells into allies
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. The study, which will be published July 9 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that preventing this reprogramming might stop breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues, a major cause of death in breast cancer patients. (2020-07-09)

Loss of intestinal goblet cells causes fatal disease after stem cell transplantation
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can cause a loss of protective goblet cells from the colon's inner lining, which can be fatal. But boosting those cells beforehand could improve the outcome. (2020-07-01)

International team of scientists warns of increasing threats posed by invasive species
URI Professor Laura Meyerson part of a team of researchers published in the journal Biological Reviews for a study on proliferation of alien invasive species and the dangers they pose. (2020-06-26)

Biomedical researchers get closer to why eczema happens
A new study from researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York may help to peel back the layers of unhealthy skin -- at least metaphorically speaking -- and get closer to a cure. (2020-06-24)

Adirondack boreal peatlands near southern range limit likely threatened by warmer climate
A study published in the journal Wetlands documents an invasion happening in the Adirondacks: the black spruce, tamarack, and other boreal species are being overcome by trees normally found in warmer, more temperate forests. Ultimately, researchers from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) predict that these invaders could overtake a variety of northern species, eliminating trees that have long been characteristic of wetlands like Shingle Shanty Preserve in the Adirondacks. (2020-06-24)

Changing environment at home genetically primes invasive species to take over abroad
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have found that a constantly fluctuating environment can enable some species to invade new areas by helping them maintain the genetic diversity they need to settle into their new homes. (2020-06-22)

How fish got onto land, and stayed there
Research on blennies, a family of fish that have repeatedly left the sea for land, suggests that being a 'jack of all trades' allows species to make the dramatic transition onto land but adapting into a 'master of one' allows them to stay there. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology. (2020-06-17)

Pitt researchers' new material allows for unprecedented imaging deeper in tissues
A team from the Department of Chemistry has established an approach for the creation of a metal-organic framework material that provides new perspectives for biological imaging. (2020-06-09)

Ancient genomic insights into the early peopling of the Caribbean
According to a new an international team of researchers from the Caribbean, Europe and North America, the Caribbean was settled by several successive population dispersals that originated on the American mainland. (2020-06-04)

University of Cincinnati study uncovers clues to COVID-19 in the brain
A study by University of Cincinnati researchers and three Italian institutions reviewing neuroimaging and neurological symptoms in patients with COVID-19 may shed light on the virus's impact on the central nervous system. (2020-05-27)

Privacy flaws in security and doorbell cameras discovered by Florida Tech Student
Ring, Nest, SimpliSafe and eight other manufacturers of internet-connected doorbell and security cameras have been alerted to ''systemic design flaws'' discovered by Florida Tech computer science student Blake Janes that allow a shared account that appears to have been removed to actually remain in place with continued access to the video feed. (2020-05-26)

How the mouse conquered the house
A study, published in Scientific Reports on May 19, 2020, reconstructs the history of the biological invasion of the house mouse and reveals that the diffusion dates into Europe coincide with the first appearance of domestic cats on the continent. (2020-05-19)

Aboriginal rock art, frontier conflict and a swastika
A hidden Murray River rockshelter speaks volumes about local Aboriginal and European settlement in the Riverland, with symbols of conflict -- including a swastika symbol -- discovered in Aboriginal rock art. The engravings studied in 188 engravings in a remote South Australian rockshelter are a stark reminder of colonial invasion and the strife brewing in Europe ahead of World War Two, Flinders University archaeologists have revealed. (2020-05-18)

Russia creates its own humanized mice to test COVID-19 vaccines and drugs
Mice sensitive to the COVID-19 infection are in development, reports the Office of the Chief State Sanitary Inspector. Russian researchers will use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to edit two genes involved in the coronavirus invasion in humans and reproduce the pathogenesis and symptoms of COVID-19 in novel, biologically safe murine models. The first results are expected in June 2020. The concept behind the study is reported in the open-access, peer-reviewed scholarly journal Research Results and Pharmacology. (2020-05-04)

Researchers develop 'piggyback' method to improve drug delivery of RNA therapeutics
A group of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and SickKids Hospital have developed a new way to deliver molecules that target specific genes within cells. Their platform has been shown to down-regulate critical genes in cancer cells, and could be used for other genetic diseases as well. (2020-05-01)

Balancing impacts of range-shifting species: Invasives vs biodiversity
For many years, the conservation community has embraced the idea that improving connectivity, that is, creating corridors so species can follow their preferred climate, will benefit biodiversity, says Toni Lyn Morelli at UMass Amherst's Climate Adaptation Science Center. But, ''I also work with invasive species experts and conservationists who know that new species can be problematic.'' One community says species arrivals are good, the other one says species arrivals are bad, and they aren't talking to each other. (2020-04-30)

Invasive lionfish likely to become permanent residents in the Mediterranean
A team of international scientists has shown the species, first seen off the coast of Cyprus in 2012, is now thriving and well-established right across southern Europe (2020-04-28)

New algorithm to help process biological images
Skoltech researchers have presented a new biological image processing method that accurately picks out specific biological objects in complex images. Their results will be presented as an oral talk at the high-profile computer vision conference, CVPR 2020. (2020-04-21)

Improving the treatment of periodontitis
For the first time, researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that a unicellular parasite commonly found in the mouth plays a role in both severe tissue inflammation and tissue destruction. (2020-04-15)

Reframing biosecurity governance as an experimental space, including as relates to handling COVID-19
Biological science and its applications are rapidly evolving, and to keep up with emerging security concerns, governance of biosecurity applications should evolve as well. (2020-04-09)

What is the Asian hornet invasion going to cost Europe?
Since its accidental introduction in 2003 in France, the yellow-legged Asian hornet Vespa velutina nigrithorax is rapidly spreading through Europe. In a new paper, published in the open-access journal Neobiota, French scientists try to estimate the costs of the invasion regarding the potential damage to apiculture and pollination services. (2020-04-06)

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