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Current Biological Sciences News and Events, Biological Sciences News Articles.
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How coastal mud holds the key to climate cooling gas
Bacteria found in muddy marshes, estuaries and coastal sediment synthesise one of the Earth's most abundant climate cooling gases -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is an important nutrient in marine environments with billions of tonnes produced annually by marine phytoplankton (microscopic plant-like cells), seaweed, corals and bacteria. (2019-08-19)

Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol. The study, in collaboration with Syngenta, found that plant circadian rhythms regulate the sensitivity of plants to a widely used herbicide according to the time of day. The findings could benefit agriculture by reducing crop loss and improving harvests. (2019-08-16)

ASU researchers use new tools of data science to capture single molecules in action
Capturing the motion of single molecules is achieved by a method known as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The catch? It takes many detections of light particles -- photons -- emitted by single molecules to get a clear picture of molecular motion. (2019-08-14)

Pinpointing the molecular mechanisms of aging
Although each and every one of us goes through it, aging is a poorly understood process. Researchers have used a biomarker called the epigenetic clock to identify a gene that is closely linked to aging in humans. This study shows that the epigenetic clock could be a good tool for improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind aging. (2019-08-13)

Methane not released by wind on Mars, experts find
New study rules out wind erosion as the source of methane gas on Mars and moves a step closer to answering the question of whether life exists on other planets. (2019-08-12)

Why so fly: MU scientists discover some fruit flies learn better than others
Fruit flies could one day provide new avenues to discover additional genes that contribute to a person's ability to learn and remember. Scientists at the University of Missouri are studying genes of fruit flies to explore why an individual fly can be a better learner than another. Many of those genes in fruit flies are similar to those found in people. (2019-08-07)

Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists
The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified by University of Bristol researchers. The findings, published in Current Biology [August 1, 2019], explain how a 450-million years ago a switch enabled plants to delay reproduction and grow shoots, leaves and buds. (2019-08-02)

Researchers build artificial cells that sense and respond to their environment
Imperial College London scientists have created artificial cells that mimic biological cells by responding to a chemical change in their surroundings. (2019-07-29)

Diets rich in blueberries yield diverse benefits
A collection of new studies in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences further quantifies how blueberry consumption can contribute to healthy aging. (2019-07-29)

Killing the seeds of cancer: A new finding shows potential in destroying cancer stem cells
When doctors remove a tumor surgically or use targeted therapies, the cancer may appear to be gone. However, evidence suggests a tiny subpopulation of adaptable cancer cells can remain and circulate through the body to seed new metastasis in far-off locations. A collaborative research project The University of Toledo has identified an entirely new class of molecules that shows promise in rooting out and killing those cancer stem cells. (2019-07-08)

Tracing the roots: Mapping a vegetable family tree for better food
In the new study, a team of multi-institution scientists led by the University of Missouri challenged prior theories of the origins of three vegetables -- canola, rutabaga and Siberian kale -- by mapping the genetic family tree of these leafy greens. (2019-07-08)

Deep Aging Clocks: The emergence of AI-based biomarkers of aging and longevity
The advent of deep biomarkers of aging, longevity and mortality presents a range of non-obvious applications. (2019-07-03)

New research shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. (2019-06-25)

Research brief: Stabilizing nations' food production through crop diversity
With increasing demand for food from the planet's growing population and climate change threatening the stability of food systems across the world, University of Minnesota research examined how the diversity of crops at the national level could increase the harvest stability of all crops in a nation. (2019-06-19)

Fishing a line coupled with clockwork for daily rhythm
Cells harbor molecular clocks that generate a circadian oscillation of about 24 h. The cyanobacterial circadian rhythm is regulated by three clock proteins. The research groups at Nagoya City University and National Institutes of Natural Sciences have revealed a sophisticated mechanism of the circadian clock proteins. Their findings have been published in Life Science Alliance. (2019-06-06)

New model predicts impact of invasive lionfish predators on coral reefs
A new model is providing insight into the impact of invasive lionfish on coral reefs in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. The venomous predatory fish has invaded more than 7.3 million square kilometers in the Atlantic and Caribbean, wreaking havoc among native fish populations. (2019-06-06)

New research shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. (2019-05-24)

Engineered bacteria could be missing link in energy storage
One of the big issues with sustainable energy systems is how to store electricity that's generated from wind, solar and waves. At present, no existing technology provides large-scale storage and energy retrieval for sustainable energy at a low financial and environmental cost. Engineered electroactive microbes could be part of the solution. (2019-05-23)

Tiny fish a big lure for life on coral reefs
Researchers from Simon Fraser University have discovered how coral reefs support such an abundance and diversity of life. Banting Postdoctoral Fellow Simon Brandl and a team of international researchers revealed that tiny fish species around the world fuel life on coral reefs. The research, published in Science, examines how commonly overlooked 'cryptobenthic' fishes -- tiny, bottom-dwelling creatures -- are a bountiful food source for larger fishes. (2019-05-23)

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size
A multidisciplinary team has provided new insight into underlying mechanisms controlling the precise size of cells. The researchers found that 'the adder,' a function that guides cells to grow by a fixed size from birth to division, is controlled by specific proteins that accumulate to a threshold. (2019-05-16)

Study details bacteria's role in recurrent urinary tract infections
A new finding by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that several species of bacteria reside in bladder tissue of postmenopausal women who experience recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs). The results, published online April 17 in the Journal of Molecular Biology, represent the first systematic analysis of biopsies from patients in this population. (2019-05-13)

New view of how ocean 'pumps' impact climate change
A new Rochester study has found that factors such as wind, currents, and even small fish play a larger role in transferring and storing carbon from the surface of the ocean to the deep oceans than was previously thought. (2019-04-25)

New wasps named after biscuits and Doctor Who aliens
University of Adelaide researchers were inspired by everything from chocolate biscuits and Doctor Who aliens when choosing names for 10 new species of wasps. (2019-04-09)

Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth
Ancient organic matter of biological origin has been tracked in multiple samples of rock spanning over 2,000 million years of Earth's history, according to UCL researchers. (2019-04-08)

Scientists call for national science agenda for biodiversity collections
The Biodiversity Collections Network (BCoN) has developed a national agenda that leverages digital data in biodiversity collections for new uses. Informed by a series of workshops and stakeholder discussions, Extending US Biodiversity Collections to Promote Research and Education will stimulate new research endeavors, particularly in areas where biology intersects with other fields and engages students and the public. (2019-04-04)

U of T Mississauga study identifies 'master pacemaker' for biological clocks
What makes a biological clock tick? According to a new study from U of T Mississauga, the surprising answer lies with a gene typically associated with stem and cancer cells. (2019-03-27)

Electron accelerators reveal the radical secrets of antioxidants
An Osaka University professor has demonstrated for the first time the value of linear particle accelerators for the generation of free radicals inside biological samples. This work will have important applications throughout biochemistry, especially for researchers studying antioxidants and photosynthesis. (2019-03-19)

Rising global shipping traffic could lead to surge in invasive species
Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study by McGill University researchers. The findings, published in the journal Nature Sustainability, suggest that shipping growth will far outweigh climate change in the spread of non-indigenous pests to new environments in coming decades. (2019-03-18)

Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox
A research group led by Professor GUO Yalong from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with SONG Ge, and Sureshkumar Balasubramanian from the School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Australia, has revealed that transposable element insertions could potentially help species with limited genetic variation adapt to novel environments. (2019-03-17)

FSU researchers discover a novel protein degradation pathway
A Florida State University research team how a type of protein that is embedded in the inner nuclear membrane clears out of the system once it has served its purpose. (2019-03-12)

'Seeing' tails help sea snakes avoid predators
New research has revealed the fascinating adaptation of some Australian sea snakes that helps protect their vulnerable paddle-shaped tails from predators. (2019-02-15)

Half-Earth preservation with Natura 2000
In recent years, calls to preserve greater swaths of the Earth's land- and seascapes have grown. In particular, numerous conservationists have called for the protection of half of the planet's surface, a bold initiative that would preserve much of the world's existing biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the path to such a 'half-Earth' preservation model lies largely in uncharted territory, with many potential pitfalls along the way. (2019-02-13)

Insight into protein formation could aid understanding of diseases
Research explains details of a biological process that supports the production of healthy cells, by removing faulty proteins as they form. (2019-02-04)

How ion adsorption affects biological membranes' functions
In a new study published in EPJ E, Izabela Dobrzy?ska from the University of Bia?ystok, Poland, develops a mathematical model describing the electrical properties of biological membranes when ions such as calcium, barium and strontium adsorb onto them at different pH levels. These factors need to be taken into account when studying the diverse phenomena that occur at the lipid membrane in living cells, such as ion transport mechanisms. (2019-01-28)

Scientists successfully obtain synthetic growth factor compatible to the native protein
In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at Kanazawa University show that an artificially synthesized molecule can exhibit compatible activities to natural molecules in its biological effectiveness. (2019-01-25)

Biosecurity strategy needed for China's Belt and Road Initiative, researchers say
China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), launched five years ago, includes more than 120 countries, linked by six proposed land-based Economic Corridors between core cities and key ports along traditional international transport routes. But, as new evidence reported in the journal Current Biology on Jan. 24 shows, the risk of introducing invasive species into new areas is substantial as it would threaten native species and biodiversity. (2019-01-24)

Nanoparticle breakthrough in the fight against cancer
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. (2019-01-17)

New integrative stratigraphy and timescale for China released
A special issue, edited by professor SHEN Shuzhong and professor RONG Jiayu of the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, summarizes the latest advances in stratigraphy and timescale as well as discusses the correlation among different blocks in China and with international timescales. (2019-01-15)

The development of a hybrid micro mixer for biological and chemical experiments
An international team of scientists including an employee of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) developed a device for mixing chemical and biological reaction feeds. The team managed to increase the mixing efficiency up to 90 percent. The new device will be used in biological and chemical experiments. The article of the scientists was published in the RSC Advances journal. (2018-12-22)

Insight into cause of rare disorder may aid quest for treatments
New findings about the causes of a rare genetic disorder that affects mainly boys, known as MeCP2 duplication syndrome, may inform the development of treatments for the condition. (2018-12-12)

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