Current Bioluminescence News and Events

Current Bioluminescence News and Events, Bioluminescence News Articles.
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Understanding cellular clock synchronization
In humans, the disruption of circadian clocks is the cause of many metabolic diseases. Thanks to an observation tool based on bioluminescence, a research (UNIGE) were able to demonstrate that cells that compose a particular organ can be in-phase, even in the absence of the central brain clock. Indeed, the scientists managed to restore circadian function in the liver in completely arrhythmic mice, demonstrating that neurons are not unique in their ability to coordinate. (2021-02-17)

Bacteria can tell the time
New research reveals that bacteria have internal clocks that align with the 24-hour cycle of life on Earth. (2021-01-08)

NYUAD researchers shed new light on mysteries behind the light emission of fireflies
A team of researchers from the NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) Smart Materials Lab (SML) led by Professor of Chemistry Panče Naumov has conducted a thorough review of the scientific literature surrounding the natural production of light, called bioluminescence, and developed conclusions that will help others in the field direct their research to uncover the mysteries behind this fascinating natural phenomenon. (2020-12-10)

Newly discovered gene may give 'sea pickles' their glow
A new study describes a bioluminescent gene that could be the reason that so-called 'sea pickles,' or pyrosomes, an underwater free-floating colony of thousands of tiny animals, reverberate in blue-green light. If confirmed, the finding would be the first bioluminescent gene identified from a chordate--the group that includes all vertebrates as well as a couple types of invertebrates: sea squirts (including pyrosomes) and lancelets. (2020-10-20)

Mass General researchers create bioluminescent tag to detect DNA break repair
A new bioluminescent reporter that tracks DNA double stranded break (DSB) repair in cells has been developed by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Academia Sinica in Taiwan. (2020-08-21)

Fireflies shed light on the function of mitochondria
By making mice bioluminescent, EPFL scientists have found a way to monitor the activity of mitochondria in living organisms. (2020-08-10)

Pinpointing the cells that keep the body's master circadian clock ticking
UT Southwestern scientists have developed a genetically engineered mouse and imaging system that lets them visualize fluctuations in the circadian clocks of cell types in mice. The method, described online in the journal Neuron, gives new insight into which brain cells are important in maintaining the body's master circadian clock. But they say the approach will also be broadly useful for answering questions about the daily rhythms of cells throughout the body. (2020-08-07)

Flashes bright when squeezed tight: How single-celled organisms light up the oceans
Research explains how a unicellular marine organism generates light as a response to mechanical stimulation, lighting up breaking waves at night. (2020-07-06)

Circadian oscillation of a cyanobacterium doesn't need all three Kai proteins to keep going
Despite conventional understanding that three Kai proteins are required for the circadian oscillation of cyanobacteria, scientists discovered that even when one of them is destroyed, the oscillation is not completely abolished but instead damped. Further, they found that the damped rhythms resonate with external cycles of approximately 24 hours, which indicates that the natural frequency of the damped oscillation is similar to a circadian clock. (2020-05-26)

Tube worm slime displays long-lasting, self-powered glow
When threatened, the marine parchment tube worm secretes a sticky slime that emits a unique long-lasting blue light. New research into how the worm creates and sustains this light suggests that the process is self-powered (2020-04-27)

Sustainable light achieved in living plants
This week in Nature Biotechnology, scientists have announced the feasibility of creating plants that produce their own visible luminescence. (2020-04-27)

Gene regulatory factors enable bacteria to kill rivals and establish symbiosis in a squid
Two factors that control the expression of a key gene required by luminescent bacteria to kill competing bacterial cells have been identified. (2020-03-06)

Portable device lights the way to better foodborne illness detection
Researchers at Purdue University have been working to develop new technologies to help stop the spread of foodborne illnesses, which kill 3,000 people a year, by detecting them more efficiently. They have developed a bioluminescence-based assay coupled with a portable device that works with smartphones and laptops to do on-site testing for harmful E. coli in food samples. (2020-02-04)

Researchers identify possible new combination treatment for advanced melanoma
Immunotherapy drug in combination with an infusion of anti-tumor immune cells may produce a stronger immune response that could help fight advanced melanoma. (2020-01-31)

New assay assesses multiple cellular pathways at once
A novel technological approach developed by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine expands from 2 to 6 the number of molecular pathways that can be studied simultaneously in a cell sample with the dual luciferase assay, a type of testing method commonly used across biomedical fields. (2019-12-13)

New algorithm detects even the smallest cancer metastases across the entire mous
Teams at Helmholtz Zentrum München, LMU Munich and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new algorithm that enables automated detection of metastases at the level of single disseminated cancer cells in whole mice. (2019-12-12)

First South American insect that emits blue light is discovered
Larvae of a fungus gnat found in Iporanga, São Paulo State, Brazil, have bioluminescent properties previously observed only in species native to North America, New Zealand and Asia. This study paves the way for new biotech applications. (2019-10-30)

Attacking metastatic breast cancer with sound
Drugs can be safely delivered to cancerous lymph nodes via the lymphatic system and then released inside the nodes using sound waves. Tohoku University researchers tested the treatment on mice with metastatic breast cancer and published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports. (2019-10-28)

Brain tissue kept alive for weeks on an artificial membrane
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research in Japan have developed a new system for keeping tissue viable for long-term study once transferred from an animal to a culture medium. The new system uses a microfluidic device that can keep tissue from both drying out and from drowning in fluid. A proof-of-concept experiment showed that tissue explanted from the mouse brain remained viable after almost one month in culture. (2019-10-09)

Researchers show how railroad worms produce red light
Differences in the molecular structures explain the different colors of this bioluminescence in different species. This discovery has the potential for new biotechnological applications, such as the imaging of muscles, blood and hemoglobin-rich tissue. (2019-09-19)

The role of GABA neurons in the central circadian clock has been discovered
Temporal order of physiology and behavior is regulated by the central circadian clock located in the SCN. The authors found that GABA in the SCN suppress the burst firing of neuronal activity and intracellular Ca2+ spikes but not for the generation and stability of the molecular circadian oscillation in the SCN. The GABA network may refine the circadian firing rhythm to ensure noiseless communications with neurons outside the SCN. (2019-09-07)

Research Brief: New type of visual filter discovered in an unlikely place
A University of Minnesota-led research team recently discovered a new way animals can modify their vision. Crystal-like structures in the photoreceptors of larval mantis shrimp simultaneously reflect and transmit light onto light sensitive cells. This newly described structure resembles how a human-made optical device, known as Fiber Bragg Grating, works. (2019-08-29)

The secret of fireworm is out: molecular basis of its light emission
A collaborative effort by an international team of scientists led to to the discovery of new luciferin from fireworm. The characterization of three key low-molecular-weight components of its bioluminescence system, presented in an article published in the PNAS journal, further enabled the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of bioluminescence of this organism. (2019-08-26)

Scientists make first observation of fish schooling using bioluminescent flashes
A new study is the first to demonstrate that schooling in fishes can be facilitated by bioluminescent flashes in the absence of ambient light. Led by researchers at the American Museum of Natural History, the research raises the possibility that fish schooling may occur in the deep sea, where it was previously assumed to be too dark for fish to coordinate their movements with each other. The study is published today in the journal PLOS ONE. (2019-08-14)

The first bioluminescent click beetle discovered in Asia represents a new subfamily
The first record of a luminescent click beetle in Asia, representing a new to science subfamily, is reported from southwest China by researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, (Kunming), Tianjin New Wei San Industrial Company, Ltd. (Tianjing, China) and the Palacký University (Olomouc, Czech Republic). Molecular analysis provided new evidence for the multiple origin of bioluminescence in the family of click beetles. The study is published in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (2019-07-23)

Dinoflagellate plankton glow so that their predators won't eat them
Some dinoflagellate plankton species are bioluminescent, with a remarkable ability to produce light to make themselves and the water they swim in glow. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 17 have found that for one dinoflagellate species (Lingulodinium polyedra), this bioluminescence is also a defense mechanism that helps them ward off the copepod grazers that would like to eat them. (2019-06-17)

Researchers discover what makes deep-sea dragonfish teeth transparent
A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego have discovered what's responsible for making the teeth of the deep-sea dragonfish transparent. This unique adaptation, which helps camouflage the dragonfish from their prey, results from their teeth having an unusually crystalline nanostructure mixed with amorphous regions. The findings could provide 'bioinspiration' for researchers looking to develop transparent ceramics. (2019-06-05)

New cable-free brain imaging method may take social neuroscience to the next level
Osaka University researchers developed a cable-free recording method that can measure brain activity associated with social behavior in mice. The method was based on a bioluminescent indicator of membrane voltage called 'LOTUS-V', which was delivered to cells via a gene expression system; it is therefore minimally invasive. LOTUS-V enabled cable-free detection of brain activity in freely moving mice. Activation in the primary visual cortex was found during social interaction. (2019-05-28)

Shedding light on cancer metabolism in real-time with bioluminescence
Cancerous tumors can be made to bioluminesce, like fireflies, according to the level of their glucose uptake, giving rise to a technique for quantifying metabolite absorption. The firefly imaging technique for sugar can be translated from cancer to many other metabolic diseases. (2019-05-20)

Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef
Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe. By using genomic data to look for genes that enhance resilience in the algae, researchers hope to help coral adapt to the environmental shifts created by climate change. (2019-05-13)

Small animals with big impact
Copepods, the world's most common animal, release unique substances into the oceans. Concentrations of these substances are high enough to affect the marine food web, according to new research from the University of Gothenburg. The studies also show that phytoplankton in the oceans detect the special scent of copepods and do their utmost to avoid being eaten. (2019-03-08)

Germ-fighting catheter coating may help prevent infections
In an innovation that may ultimately help to prevent deadly bloodstream infections, a team of biomedical engineers and infectious disease specialists at Brown University developed a coating to keep intravascular catheters from becoming a haven for harmful bacteria. (2019-03-07)

Luminescent bacteria in squid light organ drive systemic changes in host
A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, revealed that luminescent bacteria, which live harmoniously inside the Hawaiian bobtail squid's light organ, change the gene expression in other organs of their squid host. (2019-03-04)

Bioluminescence sensors make new approaches to drug discovery possible
Canadian and Brazilian researchers describe the use of 13 molecular tools for measuring different intracellular signaling pathways and evaluating the action mechanisms of new drugs. (2019-03-01)

Plants can skip the middlemen to directly recognize disease-causing fungi
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have revealed that direct physical associations between plant immune proteins and fungal molecules are widespread during attempted infection. The authors' findings run counter to current thinking and may have important implications for engineering disease resistance in crop species. (2019-02-19)

Sea fireflies
Evolution is a rich and dynamic process. Species respond to pressures in a variety of ways, most of which reduce to finding food, avoiding becoming someone else's food and attracting a mate. To solve that last one the animal kingdom is replete with fantastic, bizarre and mesmerizing adaptions. The bioluminescent courtship displays of ostracods may encapsulate all three. (2019-01-30)

Scientists discovered a set of enzymes to create glowing organisms
There are over 100 species of mushrooms that emit light. Now, scientists have for the first time identified the biochemical pathway that allows bioluminescent fungi to light up. But they went even further: by putting the three genes necessary to generate luminescence into a non-glowing yeast, they created an artificially luminescent eukaryote. Fyodor Kondrashov, professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) was co-author of the study published today in PNAS. (2018-11-28)

Scientists uncovered the mechanism of fungal luminescence and created luminescent yeasts
Russian scientists together with colleagues from UK, Spain, Brazil, Japan and Austria have fully described the mechanism of fungal luminescence. They found that fungi utilize only four key enzymes to produce light and that transfer of these enzymes into other organisms makes them bioluminescent. (2018-11-26)

A bionic mushroom that generates electricity
In the quest to replace fossil fuels, scientists are always on the lookout for alternative, environmentally friendly sources of energy. But who could have imagined a bionic mushroom that produces electricity? It sounds like something straight out of Alice in Wonderland, but researchers have now generated mushrooms patterned with energy-producing bacteria and an electrode network. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters. (2018-11-07)

Bioluminescent substance discovered in Brazilian cave worm larva
Identification of the first luciferin-producing insect belonging to the order Diptera in the Neotropics paves the way for researchers to investigate other biochemical functions of the molecule in these organisms. (2018-11-01)

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