Current Biomass News and Events

Current Biomass News and Events, Biomass News Articles.
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CABBI researchers challenge the CRP status quo to mitigate fossil fuels
Amid population expansion and severe climate conditions threatening agricultural productivity, sustainable food production is a national priority. Simultaneously, advances in bioenergy agriculture are necessary to move our energy sector away from fossil fuels. A CABBI team led by Madhu Khanna and Ph.D. student Luoye Chen suggest allocating Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land for energy biomass, eliminating the need for competition between food and energy crops and proving advantageous for landowners, the government, and the environment. (2021-02-22)

Biotechnologists developed an effective technology for nutrient biocapture from wastewater
Biotechnologists from RUDN University in collaboration with Lomonosov MSU and Kurchatov institute made an important contribution to the technology of phosphate and nitrate biocapture from wastewater using Lobosphaera algae fixed on the filters.The biomass obtained in the course of this process can be used as a fertilizer. (2021-02-19)

Scientists of Kemerovo State University have developed a technology for creating in vitro root
Scientists of Kemerovo State University have developed a technology for creating in vitro root cultures with a high content of biologically active substances. (2021-02-16)

Drone-based photogrammetry: A reliable and low-cost method for estimating plant biomass
Remote sensing technology has become an increasingly common tool used to measure plant productivity without the need for costly and time-consuming field-based measurements. However, the equipment typically used to remotely measure vegetation has remained prohibitively expensive. Here, researchers used a low-cost drone and camera to create a photomosaic of a tallgrass ecosystem. By comparing their results with measurements collected in the field, they demonstrate that photogrammetry is an accurate and reliable method of estimating biomass. (2021-02-12)

Rebuilding soil microbiomes in high-tunnel agricultural systems focus of study
The presence of high salt and nitrogen concentrations in high- tunnel soils may make it more challenging to rebuild a healthy soil microbiome following a soil-clearing event, according to microbial ecologists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. (2021-02-11)

Black carbon aerosols in Beijing become "slim"
Scientists observed evident decreases of black carbon aerosol (BC) loading in the atmosphere of urban Beijing since the implementation of China's Action Plan of Prevention and Control of Air Pollution in 2013. And the BC aerosols became ''slim'', appearing with smaller core sizes and less coatings. (2021-02-10)

What's the catch? Algal blooms influence fishing booms
The timing of phytoplankton blooms in the Red Sea could help determine next year's fish catch. (2021-02-10)

RUDN University ecologist suggested a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in animal farming
An ecologist from RUDN University suggested a method to evaluate and reduce the effect of animal farms on climate change and developed a set of measures for small farms that provides for the complete elimination of greenhouse gas emissions. (2021-02-09)

New synthetic route for biofuel production
A German-Chinese research team has found a new synthetic route to produce biofuel from biomass. The chemists converted the substance 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) produced from biomass into 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), which could be suitable as a biofuel. Compared to previous methods, they achieved a higher yield and selectivity under milder reaction conditions. (2021-02-08)

Scientists extract pigments from algae for food supplements
In the framework of the Chlorella microalgae cultivation process, the researchers obtained microalgae biomass with a high content of carotenoid pigments, which is suitable for the food industry through targeted cultivation. (2021-02-04)

Wonder fungi
Michelle O'Malley(link is external) has long been inspired by gut microbes. Since she began studying the herbivore digestive tract, the UC Santa Barbara chemical engineering professor has guided several students to their doctoral degrees, won early and mid-career awards (including a recognition from President Obama), attained tenure and advanced to the position of full professor. She even had three children along the way. A constant through it all: goat poop. (2021-02-01)

Invasive mussels now control a key nutrient in the American Great Lakes
The spread of quagga mussels across the American Great Lakes has transformed the supply of phosphorus - a key biological nutrient - to the ecosystem, according to research published this week in PNAS. (2021-01-26)

Wetter weather affects composition, numbers of tiny estuarial phytoplankton
Extreme weather events, such as hurricanes and increased precipitation, affect both the amount and the composition of picophytoplankton in the Neuse River Estuary. The work is a first step in determining how a wetter climate may affect the estuarine ecosystem. (2021-01-25)

Are partially protected areas the 'red herrings' of marine conservation?
Partially protected marine areas create confusion and don't meet their broad conservation objectives, UNSW researchers have found. (2021-01-15)

Stuck in a rut: Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a simplified state
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that ocean acidification limits algal communities to a state of low diversity and complexity. Communities grown in waters rich in carbon dioxide (CO2) were dominated by turf algae, and had low biodiversity, ecological complexity and biomass. Communities grown under acidic conditions and then transferred to waters that weren't CO2-enriched increased their biodiversity and complexity, showing that they can recover if CO2 emissions are significantly reduced. (2021-01-15)

Extreme fire weather
When the Thomas Fire raged through Ventura and Santa Barbara counties in December 2017, Danielle Touma, at the time an earth science researcher at Stanford, was stunned by its severity. Burning for more than a month and scorching 440 square miles, the fire was then considered the worst in California's history. (2021-01-14)

Expanding the biosynthetic pathway via retrobiosynthesis
KAIST metabolic engineers presented the bio-based production of multiple short-chain primary amines that have a wide range of applications in chemical industries for the first time. The research team designed the novel biosynthetic pathways for short-chain primary amines by combining retrobiosynthesis and a precursor selection step. (2021-01-13)

Smithsonian scientists reduce uncertainty in forest carbon storage calculations
Helene Muller-Landau, staff scientist was invited to write an authoritative review about carbon storage in forests. Her team combed through existing studies and came up with some novel conclusions of their own. (2021-01-13)

Researchers find wildfire smoke is more cooling on climate than computer models assume
Many of the most advanced climate models simulate smoke that is darker, or more light absorbing, than what researchers see in observations. (2021-01-12)

Researchers synthesize bio-based Methylcyclopentadiene with 3-Methylcyclopent-2-enone
Scientists from DICP synthesized bio-based MCPD via direct hydrodeoxygenation of 3-methylcyclopent-2-enone (MCP) derived from cellulose. (2021-01-07)

Energy sorghum may combine best of annual, perennial bioenergy crops
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation (CABBI) found that energy sorghum, an annual crop, behaves more like the perennial grass miscanthus in the way it efficiently captures light and uses water to produce abundant biomass. The findings highlight energy sorghum's potential as a sustainable bioenergy crop and provide critical data for biogeochemical and ecological models used to forecast crop growth, productivity, and sustainability. (2021-01-07)

Cornell University to extract energy from manure to meet peak heating demands
Cornell University is developing a system to extract energy from cattle manure to meet the campus's peak demands for heat in the winter months. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, scientists involved with the project give a detailed analysis of the issues required to make this work, including scientific, economic, and energy policy considerations. (2020-12-22)

Waste to treasure: Crayfish shells to store energy
Other than a spicy night snack, the crayfish has been endowed with greater significance. Prof. ZHU Xifeng's team from University of Science and Technology of China made it possible to use crayfish shell as the biological template for high-performance supercapacitors. (2020-12-21)

New discovery opens novel pathway for high-titer production of drop-in biofuels
Using an unusual, light-dependent enzyme and a newly discovered enzymatic mechanism, researchers from Aarhus University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have enabled the biological synthesis of high-yield industry relevant production of climate neutral drop-in fuels from biowaste. The study along with the new discovery has been published in Nature Communications. (2020-12-17)

Fertilizer runoff in streams and rivers can have cascading effects, analysis shows
Fertilizer pollution can have significant ripple effects in the food webs of streams and rivers, according to a new analysis of global data. (2020-12-17)

How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
When it gets warmer, organisms rise higher from the lowlands. Swiss Researchers investigated what could happen to plant communities on alpine grasslands if grasshoppers from lower elevations settled there. (2020-12-17)

Shedding light on the dark side of biomass burning pollution
Especially toxic, oxidized aerosol from biomass burning contains a large amount of carcinogens and mutagens. It also cause oxidative stress when inhaled as well as a wide range of diseases such as heart attacks, strokes, and asthma. A study, led by the FORTH foundation in Greece and EPFL in Switzerland, identifies new processes in the forming of these aerosols and suggests their levels are largely underestimated. (2020-12-14)

Scientists took a rare chance to prove we can quantify biodiversity by 'testing the water'
While extraction of DNA from water samples provides a convenient and non-invasive way to study aquatic biodiversity, reliable evidence that this approach is accurate enough to estimate the number of fish per species and their biomass in natural habitats, is still lacking. A new study, published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal Metabarcoding and Metagenomics, demonstrates the high precision of the method, after comparing environmental DNA data with manually collected information from a fishery farm. (2020-12-04)

Coasts drown as coral reefs collapse under warming and acidification
The coastal protection coral reefs currently provide will start eroding by the end of the century, as the world continues to warm and the oceans acidify. The rate of erosion of calcium carbonate on coral reefs will overtake the rate of accretion on the majority of present-day reefs by the end of the century. (2020-12-03)

New theory of root competition reveals rules governing growth
In the presence of competitors, plants overproduce roots to snatch up nearby resources but avoid foraging for nutrients near their neighbors, according to a new study, which provides a new theoretical foundation for understanding the rules that govern competitive root behavior. (2020-12-03)

How plants compete for underground real estate affects climate change and food production
How do plant roots store carbon? Princeton researchers found that the energy a plant devotes to its roots depends on proximity to other plants: when close together, plants heavily invest in their root systems to compete for finite underground resources; if far apart, they invest less. As about a third of the world's vegetation biomass (and carbon) is belowground, this model provides a valuable tool to predict root proliferation in global earth-system models. (2020-12-03)

Biodiesel made from discarded cardboard boxes
Dr. Sun-Mi Lee and her team at the Clean Energy Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) have announced that they have developed a novel microorganism capable of producing biodiesel precursors from lignocellulosic biomass such as discarded agricultural by-products, waste paper, and cardboard boxes. This microorganism has achieved the product yield twice of what was obtainable from its predecessors. (2020-11-30)

Cooking with wood may cause lung damage
Advanced imaging with CT shows that people who cook with biomass fuels like wood are at risk of suffering considerable damage to their lungs from breathing in dangerous concentrations of pollutants and bacterial toxins, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-25)

Warwick scientists design model to predict cellular drug targets against COVID-19
A computational model of a human lung cell has been used to understand how SARS-CoV-2 draws on human host cell metabolism to reproduce by researchers at the University of Warwick. This study helps understand how the virus uses the host to survive, and enable drug predictions for treating the virus to be made. (2020-11-25)

Extraction method affects the properties of a sustainable stabiliser, spruce gum
Spruce gum is a hemicellulose extracted from wood. It can be used to provide yoghurts, salad dressings, cosmetics and other products with a suitable texture. (2020-11-24)

Report: In retrospect, the burning of wood in district heating plants has resulted in climate saving
A new report from the University of Copenhagen shows that the burning of wood is significantly more climate friendly than coal and slightly more climate friendly than natural gas over the long run. For the first time, researchers quantified what the conversion of 10 Danish cogeneration plants from coal or natural gas to biomass has meant for their greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-11-17)

Catalyzing a zero-carbon world by harvesting energy from living cells
Scientists from Nagoya University have achieved a breakthrough in converting energy-deficient metabolites to a biorenewable resource thanks to a versatile catalyst. (2020-11-12)

More plant diversity, less pesticides
Increasing plant diversity enhances the natural control of insect herbivory in grasslands. Species-rich plant communities support natural predators and simultaneously provide less valuable food for herbivores. This was found by a team of researchers, who conducted two analogous experiments in Germany and the USA. Their results were published in Science Advances and show that increasing plant biodiversity could help reduce pesticide inputs in agricultural systems by enhancing natural biological control. (2020-11-06)

The biggest trees capture the most carbon: Large trees dominate carbon storage in forests
A recent study examining carbon storage in Pacific Northwest forests demonstrated that although large-diameter trees (21 inches) only comprised 3% of total stems, they accounted for 42% of the total aboveground carbon storage. The researchers highlight the importance of protecting large trees and strengthening existing forest management policies so that large trees can continue to sequester carbon and provide valuable ecosystem services as a cost-effective natural climate solution in worldwide forest ecosystems. (2020-11-05)

Future lake food webs in subarctic have more biomass and contain more omega-3 fatty acids
Subarctic regions are facing rapid changes in climate and land-use intensity. An international research team recently completed an investigation to see how these changes are affecting the food webs and fish communities of lakes in northern Finland. Biomasses and omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, were determined from the algal producers at the base of food web to large carnivorous fish from 20 lakes along a pronounced climatic and productivity gradient. (2020-10-30)

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