Current Biomass News and Events | Page 3

Current Biomass News and Events, Biomass News Articles.
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Cattle vs. hippopotamus: Dung in rivers of the Savannah
In many regions of the world, populations of large mammalian herbivores have been displaced by cattle breeding, for example in Kenya the hippos by large herds of cattle. This can change aquatic ecosystems due to significant differences in the amount and type of dung input. Researchers from the University of Eldoret in Kenya, the University of Innsbruck and the Leibniz-IGB have therefore taken a closer look at the dung of hippopotamus and cattle. (2020-06-16)

Tillage and cover cropping effects on grain production
Soybean yields decreased when planted after cereal rye. (2020-06-04)

Study demonstrates association between exposure to air pollution and vascular damage
Researchers who analysed data from more than 3,000 people in India found gender-specific differences in sources of exposure and health outcomes. (2020-06-03)

Oil platforms' fishy future
Marine biologists forecast the effects of oil platform decommissioning on fish communities. (2020-06-02)

Summer forage capabilities of tepary bean and guar in the southern great plains
Research identifies tepary bean and guar as potential summer forages. (2020-05-28)

Balancing the economy while saving the planet
A new research-based framework lets companies make informed decisions balancing economic and sustainability factors when producing bio-chemicals. (2020-05-28)

Sugar turns brown algae into good carbon stores
Brown algae are important players in the global carbon cycle by fixing large amounts of carbon dioxide and thus extracting this greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. Moreover, because microbial decomposition of dead brown algae is slower than that of other marine plants, carbon dioxide fixed by brown algae remains much longer in the sea. Scientists from Bremen therefore explored why brown algae degrade so slowly. They found that only highly specialized bacteria can carry out the degradation with the help of more than hundred enzymes. (2020-05-26)

Breaking down stubborn cellulose in time lapse
Researchers at Graz Unversity of Technology in Austria have for the first time ever succeeded in visualizing at the single-molecule level the processes involved in a biological nanomachine, known as the cellulosome, as it degrades crystalline cellulose. The fundamental insights thus obtained could support sustainable concepts of cellulose utilization to make a breakthrough in industrial biotechnology. (2020-05-25)

Long-term resilience of Earth's tropical forests in warmer world
A long-term assessment of the sensitivity of hundreds of tropical forest plots to increasing temperatures brings encouraging news: in the long run, Earth's tropical forests may be more resilient to a moderately warming world than short-term predictions have suggested. (2020-05-21)

Emissions from road construction could be halved using today's technology
The construction sector accounts for a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions, in Sweden and globally. Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg studied the construction of an eight km stretch of road and calculated how emissions could be reduced now and by 2045, looking at everything from materials choice, production technology, supply chains and transport. (2020-05-18)

Even biodiverse coral reefs still vulnerable to climate change and invasive species
A new study reveals clear evidence highlighting the importance of fish biodiversity to the health of spectacular tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, the study's results show that even though strong relationships between diversity and a healthy ecosystem persist, human-driven pressures of warming oceans and invasive species still diminish ecosystems in various ways. (2020-05-18)

How to boost plant biomass: Biologists uncover molecular link between nutrient availability, growth
In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), plant genomic scientists at New York University's Center for Genomics & Systems Biology discovered the missing piece in the molecular link between a plant's perception of the nitrogen dose in its environment and the dose-responsive changes in its biomass. (2020-05-11)

Researchers turn algae leftovers into renewable products with flare
Researchers take waste products from algae-based omega-3 oil production and convert them into valuable and renewable polyurethane foams with a range of of commercial applications -- from flip-flops and running shoe soles to mattresses and yoga mats. (2020-05-11)

Benthos in the Antarctic Weddell Sea in decline
Over the past quarter-century, changes in Antarctic sea-ice cover have had profound impacts on life on the ocean floor. (2020-05-07)

Severe coral loss leaves reefs with larger fish but low energy turnover
Research on the Great Barrier Reef has found severe coral loss to be associated with substantial increases in the size of large, long-living herbivorous fish. However, decreased recycling of this fish biomass could leave the ecosystem vulnerable to crashing. The research is published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology. (2020-05-06)

Researchers make key advance toward production of important biofuel
An international research collaboration has taken an important step toward the commercially viable manufacture of biobutanol, an alcohol whose strong potential as a fuel for gasoline-powered engines could pave the path away from fossil fuels. (2020-04-27)

Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
A new study highlights that tropical coral reef marine reserves can offer little defence in the face of climate change impacts. And the changes that are being observed will force scientists, conservationists and reserve managers to rethink the role these protected areas can bring. (2020-04-24)

New research explores the impact of cover crop residues on weed control
Cover crops have a well-documented role to play in suppressing troublesome weeds. But what happens as those cover crops degrade? (2020-04-23)

Global changes in insect populations reflect both decline and growth
The widely reported 'insect apocalypse' is far more nuanced than previous studies have suggested, according to a new study, which reports the findings of a meta-analysis featuring data from 166 long-term surveys across 1,676 sites worldwide. (2020-04-23)

Common soil fungus could be ally in organic corn growers' fight against pests
A common soil fungus might be enlisted as a powerful partner by corn producers to suppress pests and promote plant growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest promoting the fungus could be an especially valuable strategy for organic growers who struggle with insect control. (2020-04-23)

New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. They also succeeded in cultivating this microbe in the laboratory. What is particularly remarkable is that the mechanism by which it breaks down ethane is reversible. In the future, this could allow to use these microbes to produce ethane as an energy source. The study has now been published in the journal mBio. (2020-04-21)

Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Bern. (2020-04-21)

Ants restore Mediterranean dry grasslands
A team of ecologists and agronomists led by Thierry Dutoit, a CNRS researcher, studied the impact of the Messor barbarus harvester ant on Mediterranean dry grasslands. Their study shows that these invertebrates accelerated the resilience of plant communities in these degraded grasslands by facilitating their recovery. (2020-04-20)

Valorizing wastewater can improve commercial viability of biomass oil production
Oil produced from biomass can provide a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. But technological challenges make it difficult to scale up production. A new study from the University of Illinois discusses methods to manage wastewater from biocrude oil production, providing a possible path to commercially viable production. (2020-04-17)

Meeting multiple management goals to maximize coral reef health
While management strategies can be effective at achieving reef fisheries' conservation goals, a new study reveals how increased human pressure makes conservation of coral reef biodiversity truly difficult to achieve. (2020-04-16)

Turned-down temperatures boost crops' penchant for production
Drought and heat put stress on plants and reduce grain yield. For some farmers, irrigation is the answer. Many of us assume the practice boosts crop yields by delivering soil water, but it turns out irrigation's cooling effect on crops is important in its own right. (2020-04-14)

Soot may only be half the problem when it comes to cookstoves
Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering spent two weeks in India cooking with local residents. They found that soot wasn't the only worrisome byproduct of traditional cookstoves; organic carbons are causing problems, too. (2020-04-14)

Long-living tropical trees play outsized role in carbon storage
A group of trees that grow fast, live long lives and reproduce slowly account for the bulk of the biomass -- and carbon storage -- in some tropical rainforests, a team of scientists says in a paper published this week in the journal Science. The finding that these trees, called long-lived pioneers, play a much larger role in carbon storage than previously thought may have implications in efforts to preserve forests as a strategy to fight climate change. (2020-04-09)

Mutation reduces energy waste in plants
In a way, plants are energy wasters: in order to protect themselves from excessive electron transport, they continuously quench light energy and don't use it for photosynthesis and biomass production. A mutation can make them work more efficiently, as was discovered by a team from Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). (2020-04-08)

Tracking Southern Hemisphere black carbon to Antarctic snow
Biomass burning represents around 80% of all BC emitted to the atmosphere in the Southern Hemisphere, which means that the fires happening in Australia, New Zealand and South America ultimately leave a mark in Antarctic snow. (2020-04-07)

Making biofuels cheaper by putting plants to work
One strategy to make biofuels more competitive is to make plants do some of the work themselves. Scientists can engineer plants to produce valuable chemical compounds, or bioproducts, as they grow. Then the bioproducts can be extracted from the plant and the remaining plant material can be converted into fuel. But one important part of this strategy has remained unclear -- exactly how much of a particular bioproduct would plants need to make in order to make the process economically feasible? (2020-04-06)

How the chemical industry can meet the climate goals
ETH researchers analysed various possibilities for reducing the net CO2 emissions of the chemical industry to zero. Their conclusion? The chemical industry can in fact have a carbon-neutral future. (2020-04-06)

Impacts of cover crop planting dates on soil properties after 4 years
Low biomass production limits cover crop effects on soils. (2020-04-02)

Scientists find a fluctuating rising trend of open agricultural straw burning in Northeast China
Open biomass burning (OBB) has a significant impact on regional air quality, especially on the heavy haze pollution in Northeast China (NEC) in recent years. Recent research published in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters provides scholars and decision-makers with a more comprehensive and long-term analysis of the spatiotemporal patterns of OBB in NEC. (2020-04-02)

Overcoming carbon loss from farming in peatlands
Miscanthus, willow found as good biomass crops to add carbon to vulnerable soils. (2020-04-01)

Upgrading biomass with selective surface-modified catalysts
Loading single platinum atoms on titanium dioxide promotes the conversion of a plant derivative into a potential biofuel. (2020-03-26)

Sugar brings a lot of carbon dioxide into the deeper sea
The oceans are a very important reservoir for carbon in the system of the earth. However, many aspects of the marine carbon cycle are still unknown. Scientists from Bremen and Bremerhaven now found that sugar plays an important role in this process. At the same time, the sweet energy source is important for the ecosystem of the oceans. (2020-03-18)

A new use for museum fish specimens
This paper suggests using museum specimens to estimate the length-weight relationships of fish that are hard to find alive in their natural environment. (2020-03-12)

Newly proposed method offers fermentable sugars from sustainable lignocellulosic biomass
Researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology proposed a new method that offers fermentable sugars from sustainable lignocellulosic biomass. (2020-03-11)

A novel biofuel system for hydrogen production from biomass
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has presented a new biofuel system that uses lignin found in biomass for the production of hydrogen. (2020-03-10)

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